TRIPHENA PIEARCY CHOCTAW CITIZENSHIP PETITION

The Dawes Commission Roll Book, the Final Rolls of the Five Civilized Tribes, was used for Certification of Degree of Indian Blood.  These rolls were compiled from 1899-1906. To be enrolled, certain requirements must be met, which varied by tribe. Application had to be made during the enrollment period, showing membership in the tribe and actual residence within the area occupied by the tribe. So, anyone who died before 1899 would not have a roll number.

If anyone lived outside Indian Territory, they would not qualify to apply on the Dawes Commission. According to her application for the Dawes Rolls, Triphena (also spelled Tryphena) Elizabeth McGinnis Piearcy, her children and grandchildren moved from Texas to Indian Territory in 1894.

Many of these records are online. Through a Google search, I found over twenty  pages of records where, starting on February 1, 1898, Triphena Elizabeth McGinnis Piearcy filed a petition against the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, declaring herself and her children as Choctaw Indians. Appeals went back and forth in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Citizenship Court in Ardmore, Indian Territory and in Tishomingo, the seat of the Southern District of the Indian Territory, until 1904, when the court ruled that the plaintiffs, Triphena Elizabeth Pearcy and her children “were not entitled to be deemed or declared citizens of the Choctaw Nation, or to enrollment as such, or to any rights whatever flowing  therefrom.” No reason was given for this decision. Follow this link to see the records.  digital.libraries.ou.edu/whc/nam/manuscripts/cornish_melven_002_010.pdf

In the lawsuit, Dovey Alpine Piearcy (Eva Buckmaster Musgrove’s mother) is not listed as applicant for Choctaw citizenship, even though both her parents are listed as well as her younger siblings. Wonder why? I certainly did and have started looking more into Dovey’s records. But that’s for a later post after more research.

The Piearcy name was spelled many different ways from (Perce to Person), but this family line seemed to settle on this spelling (mostly) after the Civil War.

 copyright © 2013 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho