Revolutionary War Battle at Musgrove Mill

Musgrove Mill was not owned by our branch of Musgrove’s, who lived in New Jersey and Pennsylvania then. I have no evidence any of our other ancestors were with the Whigs/Colonists or the Loyalists/Tories at the Battle of Musgrove Mill, but some South Carolina men were there. I’m including this information because of our shared family name.

On August 18, 1780, 200 mounted Patriots under joint command of Colonels Isaac Shelby, James Williams and Elijah Clarke raided a Loyalist camp at Musgrove’s Mill, which controlled the local grain supply and guarded a ford of the Enoree River. 

The Battle of Musgrove Mill, August 19, 1780, occurred near the present day border between Spartanburg, Laurens and Union Counties in South Carolina. During the course of the battle, 200 Patriot militiamen defeated a force of about 300 Loyalist militiamen and 200 provincial regulars.

 Using frontier tactics, a band of about twenty men under Captain Shadrach Inman crossed the Enoree and engaged the enemy. Faking confusion, they retreated until the Loyalists were nearly on the Patriot line. The surprised Loyalists fired too early. The Patriots held their fire until the Loyalists got within killing range of their muskets.

 The whole battle took about an hour with the Patriots shrieking Indian war cries. Sixty three Tories were killed and seventy were taken prisoner. The Patriots lost only four dead, including Captain Inman. With General Horatio Gate’s recent defeat at Camden, the victory at Musgrove Mill heartened the Patriots and served as further evidence the South Carolina backcountry could not be held by the Tories.

Shelby and men crossed back over the Appalachian Mountains and into the area of present day Elizabethton, Tennessee. By the next month, Colonels Shelby, John Sevier, and Charles McDowell and their 600 men had joined forces with Col. William Campbell and his 400 Virginia men in advance of the October 7, 1780, Battle of Kings Mountain near present day Blacksburg, South Carolina.  

The Musgrove Mill battlefield has been preserved as the Musgrove Mill State Historic Site, the newest unit of the South Carolina park system. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.  

Sources

  • “Knox, James Knox, Sr. and Elizabeth Craig Knox and their Descendants,” compiled by Lorene K. Petersen and Jennie Bell Lyle, 1984 for much of the material in this Knox section.
  • Wikipedia for the Battle of Musgrove Mill material.

Copyright 2013 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Samuel Musgrave and Elizabeth Brand – Revolutionary War Service

Musgrave
Samuel Musgrave – Revolutionary War Patriot

Samuel was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1747. He was one of eight children born to Moses Musgrove Jr. and Elizabeth, who’s last name is unknown. He moved to Fayette County, PA., then to Muhlenburgh County, Kentucky, and finally, to Warwick County, Indiana. Samuel is the third generation of his family to live in what became the United States of America. His parents and grandparents were Quakers, who did not believe in war and fighting. So Samuel, as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, could not have participated in Quaker services, until reinstated to the Monthly Meeting, after confessing his sins. There is no evidence this ever happened.

“Samuel married Elizabeth Brand on September 10, 1767 in Pennsylvania.” Most of the information we have on him is from his Revolutionary War pension applications. The information within the quotation marks has been summarized by Richard Graham Musgrove and Samuel’s 5th great grand-daughter, Jennifer Berryman at the behest of her grandmother, Beulah Arlene Musgrove Berryman and great-aunt, Norma Ennis Musgrove Craig.

“Samuel began his military service as a Private in the Cumberland County militia. He was assigned to the 4th Battalion and served in the 8th Company. He refers to his immediate superior officer as “Captain Jack.”His first day’s march carried them toward Shippenstown, now named Shippensburg. A sixty mile march to the Susquehanna River carried them through Carlisle. He related that they “went on the river” to Lancaster County where they enjoyed a short few days of rest. Captain Jack took his men down the main road to Chester County and to Philadelphia. (When traveling through Lancaster and Chester Counties, he was traveling near the area where he was born and raised.) Crossing the Schuylkill River on a floating bridge, they arrived in Philadelphia and were given ten days rest after being assigned to barracks.

“They next traveled by sloop on the Delaware River to Trenton, New Jersey.

Revolutionary War Flag

With Long Island, New York, as their destination, they marched through Princeton and arrived in time for the battle on August 27, 1776. Approximately 3,500 colonists were under the command of Generals Washington, Sullivan, Putnam and Sterling. They suffered casualties of about 300 killed and 1,100 wounded or captured while facing a superior force of British troops. Using fog to cover their departure, the colonists crossed the East River in small boats. His unit returned to Philadelphia and, after a few days was verbally discharged and told to return to his home.

“He was welcomed with open arms by Elizabeth and four children, Huldah, Moses, Mary and Samuel Davies. During this break in his militia service, David was born. In July 1777, Samuel began another three months of service in the militia. He relates that his officers were William Duffle, George Crawford and John Cunningham who were under the command of Colonel Jonas McCoy. His company marched into Delaware and remained there a short time until General Washington moved his army back to New Port, Pennsylvania. Recrossing the Brandywine River, his company joined forces with a battalion of riflemen under a Colonel Erwin. As a part of a scouting party, Samuel was sent to Tron Hill to determine the size of the British force and their positions. (Battle of Brandywine.)

“He and others of his militia were sent to march with a group of Regulars to Chadd’s Ford where they were positioned to the right of the army for the battle which occurred on September 11, 1777. This time the colonists were more evenly matched. About 11,000 men fought under General Washington. British Generals Howe, Cornwallis and Knyphausen led about 12,500 troops and suffered 90 killed and 480 wounded or captured.

“Following the battle, Samuel’s unit returned to Philadelphia. He was ill and furloughed for two weeks. He stayed with his sister at Chadd’s Ford. Upon return to his unit, he was still too ill to travel and, since his three months were up, was discharged.

“In 1782, he was drafted again to serve his country as an Indian scout (spy-from DAR records.)Leaving behind two more children, James and Elizabeth, he served two months. Scouting in groups of five, six or seven men, they were based in a stockade fort at Hannahtown, Pennsylvania (the town had been burned by Indians) and served under Lt. Robert Ritche.

Their remaining children were born following this last term of service to his country. Sarah, Jane and William were born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania and the youngest, Ann in Monongalia County, Virginia, now West Virginia.

Samuel and Elizabeth moved to Warrick County, Indiana.”*

Samuel Musgrove was awarded a pension for his Revolutionary War Service receiving $26.66 per annum from March 4, 1821, issued December 9, 1833.

Samuel Musgrave, Revolutionary War Patriot Gravestone

Elizabeth Musgrove also applied for a pension on January 30, 1843, age 93, from Warwick County, Ind., as the widow of Samuel Musgrove, who had died on September 2, 1834. Bible records proving the birth dates of their children were filed: Huldah, b 10 June 1768; Moses, b 8 May 1770; Mary, b 22 June 1772; Samuel Davies, b 22 mar 1775; David, b 22 Nov 1776; Elizabeth, b 25 July 1781; Sarah, b 21 Nov 1783; William, b 19 May 1788; Margaret, b 17 June 1780 and Ann, b 19 Dec 1790. Their son, Moses, is our ancestor.

NOTE: In DAR records and in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly article, Samuel’s last name is listed as MUSGROVE, though other records, including gravestone, say MUSGRAVE.

Sources

*Extensive quotes for Samuel, Moses and Enos Musgrave from “The American Family Musgrove,” by Richard Graham Musgrove.

“National Genealogical Society Quarterly: Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Applications.”

Samuel Musgrove – Pension Claim W9211, PA service, Indiana Agency.; Certificate 25203. Act 7 June 1832.

“Roster of Soldiers and Patriots of the American Revolution Buried in Indiana,” Mrs. Roscoe O’Byrne, page 263 for Samuel Musgrave information.

Research of Jennifer Berryman, Beulah Arlene Musgrove Berryman and Norma Ennis Musgrove Craig.

 

Eoff – Jacob, Peter and Isaac: Three Generations of Patriots

Revolutionary War Flag

In an earlier post, we discussed the Palatine German migration and our first ancestor, Han Jacob Eoff who died in 1710 while still in quarantine on Governor’s Island, New York. His widow, Magdalena was listed with two children, John Jacob Offin age 8, and Anna Barbara Offin age 6. Magdalena  and the children somehow avoided the work camps. She married Joan Peter Kassener (John Peter Castner) in New York  April 2, 1711. (The Eoffs were ancestors of Edith McIntire Holder.)

In 1734, Johan Jacob Öff purchased 432 acres in Somerset County, New Jersey. There Jacob Öff/Eoff built a large tavern/inn which was well known for its soft beds and warm hospitality. It remained in the family for several generations. Jacob also donated the land and money to build Zion Lutheran Church, the cornerstone of which still stands today. The small town that built up around the Eoff tavern was called Pluckemin, supposedly so named because of Jacob’s talent at ‘Plucking them in’…

The most famous patron of the inn was George Washington, who leading a bedraggled but victorious army stopped at the Inn on January 5, 1777 to write to Congress and tell them of his victory at Princeton, New Jersey.

One of the first Masonic Lodges, Solomon’s Lodge No 1 F&A&M, Somverville, New Jersey, was organized in the barn of Christian Eoff, one of Jacob’s sons.   

Jacob Eoff died in Pluckemin, Somerset County, New Jersey on September 9, 1780. His wife was Marie Magdalen Spohnheimer.

Revolutionary War Records for New Jersey show that Jacob Öff took the loyalty oath and served as a private soldier. DAR records show he provided supplies to the Revolutionary Army. His DAR patriot number is A037036. He is listed in the Somerset County, New Jersey censuses of 1775 and 1779.

Johann Jacob Öff’s will is on file in the courthouse at Trenton, New Jersey. His estate was estimated at 13,000 pounds and included nine bound books and six unbound books! Who could imagine a small boy coming to America, with his father dead on Governor’s Island, leaving an estate valued over $1,120,000 in 2012 US dollars, as well as having a library of books!

Peter Eoff: DAR Patriot Number – A204951

Peter was born in Bridgewater, Somerset County, New Jersey in about 1734. He married Elizabeth, last name unknown, in 1760 in Somerset County, New Jersey. They had nine children. He managed the Inn for a while after his brother, Christian.

 We don’t know why the family left the relative comfort of New Jersey, but by 1780, they were on the frontier in Camden District, South Carolina. When Peter was drafted, his son Isaac served as his substitute. This was a common practice, with more experienced men staying home to work the fields and manage the livestock. Peter did serve in the militia in 1780 under Captain Jones. Peter died on December 5, 1788, in Madison County, Kentucky at the age of 54. Elizabeth lived in the same area until she died in 1805 at the age of 71.

Isaac Eoff gravestone

Isaac Eoff: DAR Patriot Number – A033811

Isaac was born on January 12, 1761 in Somerset County, New Jersey. He first served in the Revolutionary War, when he was sixteen years of age, in the place of his father who was drafted in Chester County, South Carolina. He served for four months at Charleston under Captain John Mills in Sumpter’s regiment. He then enlisted for ten months in a company commanded by Captain Mills who joined Sumpter. He served four months under Alexander Fagin , was in battle when Sumpter was defeated was in the battles of Fish Dam Ford, Blackstock and Eutaw Springs where he was taken prisoner. He served a total of 201 days. In almost all his tours of duty, he served with one of James Knox’ sons or sons-in-law. We’re not sure when or where he met Margaret Knox, but we’re glad they met. They married on March 12, 1783. They went on to have eight children, all born in South Carolina. In 1810, the family moved to Pulaski County, Kentucky. By 1840, they were in Cannon County, Tennessee.

Isaac died on October 2, 1841. His white marble headstone is located in the Civil War Cemetery in Coffee County, Tennessee just off I-24 at Beech Grove exit at Highway 64. Exit off toward Beech Grove, the cemetery is on the left on a small knoll. The Civil War Cemetery is older than the Civil War. The name was changed after the War because of the many Civil War solders buried there, most with no names on their headstones. This is a federal cemetery and well kept, very pretty and peaceful.

After his death, Margaret moved with most of her children to Carroll County, Arkansas, where she died in 1848, far away from Ireland where she was born.

 This family represents one of the few families I’ve seen, who have three generations of patriots in support of the Revolutionary War.

DAR Logo

My DAR application through Isaac Eoff is pending. If my application is approved, if you are a woman in this family line within three generations of me, you can apply to DAR using a short form. Let me know if you have question. amp

 

Sources

  • “A Study of the German Immigrants Who Arrived in Colonial New York in 1710″ Published 1985. This set includes two pages of data on the Off family–see p. 713 of Volume II
  • “The Palatine Families of New York” by Henry Z. Jones, Jr.
  • Peter Eoff – provided a substitute, his son, Isaac. Captain Jones, militia; “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in American Revolution,” AA. 2232A L325. SC Arch Acct. Aud #1004, Roll #4842, SR3362V-pension of Isaac Eoff.
  • Isaac Eoff -National Archives file #3362; served in the army from Chester Co SC #326, Book L. “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in American Revolution,” AA. 2232A L325.

Copyright, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.