Daisy McIntire Vickers Revisited – Recipes and More #2 of 52 Ancestors Update

After my blog on Daisy McIntire Vickers, several of her descendants responded.  As you may remember, Daisy was raised in Arkansas and a sister to my great-grandfather, Thomas Hendrix McIntire. Daisy had nine sons with eight living to adulthood. She was a young widow, raising the youngest sons on her own.

In her book, Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via mentioned Daisy’s jam cake and fruit salad recipes. Of course, I asked if anyone had the recipes.  My newly found Vickers cousins certainly came through.

Here’s the Jam Cake recipe in Daisy’s own handwriting, dated 1955 on the back.

 

Daisy McIntire Vickers' Christmas Jam Cake Recipe
Daisy McIntire Vickers’ Christmas Jam Cake Recipe

 

Daisy McIntire Vickers' Christmas Jam Cake Recipe back
Daisy McIntire Vickers’ Christmas Jam Cake Recipe back

For those of you who need modern instructions for the cake, here is the recipe updated by one of Daisy’s descendants.

 

Modern version of Daisy's Jam Cake Recipe
Modern version of Daisy’s Jam Cake Recipe

And here is a picture of the cake, made with boisenberry jam.  While the recipe says to put batter into 3 cake pans, the recipe made two layers for the cake below, so you might want to adjust the ingredients if you want a tall three layer cake. Looks pretty yummy doesn’t it.

 

Daisy's Jam Cake made with Boisenberry Jam
Daisy’s Jam Cake made with Boisenberry Jam

 

Grandma Daisy Vickers’ Christmas Fruit Salad

 In equal amounts:

 

  • Apples, peeled, cored and cubed.
  • Oranges, peeled, separated, seeded. Cut each segment in thirds if a large orange – or half if smaller.
  • Grapes (Grandma always used the large seeded ones – we had to cut in half and remove the seeds.) 

 

 16 oz can of cherries (I seem to remember they were red – but I don’t remember if sweetened or unsweetened – I think either would be OK – it would affect amount of sugar needed is all).

 16 oz can of pineapple. Drain juice and reserve.

 Add sugar and reserved pineapple juice.  (Don’t add a big amount of sugar.  Taste in a few hours, add more if needed.) The sugar draws the juice from the other fruit to mingle with the cherry and pineapple juice.

 Cover tightly (a jar or jug with a lid is ideal).  Refrigerate, at least overnight.  When grandma had her assembly line going at our house,  we didn’t have a refrigerator so we made it Christmas Eve and ate it on Christmas Day.  It is good for 2 or 3 days if refrigerated.

When ready to serve, add sliced banana (only in what is to be served at that meal). 

While these were recipes for intended for Christmas, with Easter coming up, how about including one or both of these recipes in your Easter Sunday meal? If you do, put pictures of Facebook and tell us what kind of jelly you used in the cake.

Remember this picture from the earlier blog – Daisy McIntire Vickers. Here is a better copy provided by a Vickers family member.

 

Daisy and William A. Vickers with all their sons-picture used by permission from a Vickers cousin Information on the picture states this is the William & Daisy Vickers family with all of their children, with the other couple Thomas Elihue Vickers and Clare Mae Wade Vickers.  My best guess based on size compared to ages from the 1930 census is starting from the three standing in the back – Wymond, Bordon, Richard. Then Elihue with his wife Clara, Forest, Jennings – standing just behind Ford, Ford, Ralph, Daisy and William. This picture probably taken around 1930.
Daisy and William A. Vickers with all their sons-picture used by permission from a Vickers cousin
Information on the picture states this is the William & Daisy Vickers family with all of their children, with the other couple Thomas Elihue Vickers and Clare Mae Wade Vickers. My best guess based on size compared to ages from the 1930 census is starting from the three standing in the back – Wymond, Bordon, Richard. Then Elihue with his wife Clara, Forest, Jennings – standing just behind Ford, Ford, Ralph, Daisy and William. This picture probably taken around 1930.

The next picture was taken 60 years later, on the occasion of Clara Wade Vickers  Brady’s 80th birthday. Clara is sitting front and center with the corsage surrounded by all her descendants. These are the descendants from just Elihue and Clara. No wonder Daisy’s post has been my most viewed blog post!

 

Clara Wade Vickers Davis 80th Birthday Party
Clara Wade Vickers Brady’s 80th Birthday Party

Below, one final picture of Daisy McIntire Vicker’s in her later years, still with a beautiful smile, high cheek bones and the white, white hair still seen in many of the McIntire family lines.

 

Daisy McIntire Vickers in a rocking chair
Daisy McIntire Vickers in a rocking chair

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Samuel Musgrave – Revolutionary War Soldier and “Indian Spy” #5 in 52 Ancestors

Musgrave
Picture given to Norma Ennis Craig Musgrove by a relative stating the subject was Samuel Musgrave. Does anyone have proof of this?Samue

Samuel Musgrave (Musgrove) was a Revolutionary War soldier who fought under General Washington in the Battle of Brandywine. The battle between the Americans and the British army under General Howe took place on September 11, 1777 near Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. The British won the battle, eventually capturing Philadelphia on September 26 and occupying that city until June 1778.[1]

Based on the research of Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via and others, along with my research, I was accepted into the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) with Jacob Eoff as my ancestor. Follow these links to see earlier posts on the Eoffs and Palatine Germans.

Samuel Musgrove was just approved by the DAR as a supplemental patriot for me. Norma Ennis Craig Musgrove did the research linking her grandfather William Tate Musgrave (Musgrove) to Samuel. Norma was a DAR member herself.

You’ve probably noticed the two different spellings of Samuel’s and William Tate’s last name. William Tate used the spelling Musgrave in his early days, then Musgrove later in life. One family genealogist speculated the spelling was changed to differentiate the child from his first wife from the children by his second wife. Pure speculation, but the timing is about right. Samuel Musgrave’s Quaker parents and grandparents generally used Musgrave as did Samuel’s children. The DAR database is about the only place I’ve seen Samuel’s name spelling Musgrove.

Samuel was the fourth generation of his line in the United States.[2] He was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1747 and died on 2 Sept 1833 in Warrick County, Indiana at 87 years of age.[3] He married Elizabeth Brand in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania on 10 Sept 1767.[4] She was born in Pennsylvania about 1750 and died about 1843 in Warrick County, Indiana.[5]

Samuel enlisted in July 1776 in Cannonkackick Settlement, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and served three months.[6] In 1782, he served twelve more months as an “Indian Spy” under Lt. Robert Ritchie in Pennsylvania Troops.[7] Much of this information is in Samuel’s Proof Pension Claim W.9211.[8] On 30 Dec 1834, Elizabeth filed for a widow’s pension.[9]

Many of the Native Americans had treaties with the British, whom they supported during the war.[10]An Indian Spy patrolled the trails along the frontier warning the settlers of impending attacks.[11] Generally the spys or scouts were divided into pairs, with each pair assigned a section of the frontier were war paths were watched.[12] The spys were not an attack force, but warned the settlers so they could prepare for defense. [13] The men carried their supplies on their backs, slept on the ground and foraged for food living off deer and bear meat.[14] This was a very different life from Samuel’s Quaker relatives who stayed in settled areas, especially considering the pacifist Quaker beliefs. Follow these links to see previous blogs on Samuel Musgrave and Moses Musgrave.

DAR Logo
DAR Logo

If you are a woman over the age of 18 years and descended from either my McIntire/Eoff line or  Musgrave line, you are eligible for DAR membership. If you are interested, contact me for my DAR number and contact your local DAR chapter for more details.[15] Since the research has been done on those lines, you’ll need to collect fewer documents to prove your lineage. For the men, the same information can be used to apply for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution.



[1] Wikipedia, Battle of Brandywine, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Brandywine : accessed 27 Feb 2014.)

[2] Musgrove, Duane and Marie Wilson, A History of the Moses Musgrave Family, Quakers, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Kansas and Further West (Indiana, Evansville Bindery, Inc, 1998), p 11.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Ibid.

[10] Zeigler, Fred, Cook’s Old Mill, ( http://www.cooksoldmill.com/text/article-jcook.html : accessed 27 Feb 2014). Clinch Scouts, (http://vagenweb.org/lee/ClinchScoutsMA.html : accessed 27 Feb 2014).

[11] Ibid.

[12] Ibid.

[13] Ibid

[14] Ibid.

[15] National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, (http://www.dar.org/default.cfm : accessed 27 Feb 2014).

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho