Unknown Ancestors – Pictures from the Musgrove collection #4 of 52 Ancestors

Copyright 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
Copyright 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Last summer, a Musgrove aunt gave me several pictures collected by my paternal grandparents,  William Musgrove Jr and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove. Most of these photographs had been removed from photo albums and had no other identification. Perhaps, someday a Musgrove, Buckmaster, Pennington, Medcalf or Hopkins cousin will find this blog and identify these ancestors or family friends. Family members with all these surnames lived in or near Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma.

Copyright 2014 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho
Copyright 2014 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

The three photographs in today’s post were all taken by Klepfer Studio in McLoud, Oklahoma. From what I’ve learned today about early photography, these were probably all taken sometime shortly after 1900. A call to the McLoud library indicated no city directories are available to decide when Klepfer Studio was in business. I did find a Klepfer photographer in the Oklahoma City area and sent a message through Facebook, just in case the McLoud Studio owner was related. Using Google images search, no matches for these images showed up. Articles and books recommend looking at clothing/hairstyles to decide a range of years the pictures could be taken. I’m thinking that might work better in a metropolitan area. Any suggestions on how to identify these old photographs would be appreciated.

Copyright 2014 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho
Copyright 2014 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

We originally thought the picture of the baby in the wicker baby carriage might be my grandfather, William Musgrove Jr., but after seeing a labeled picture of my grandfather in a different gown, this is probably a different baby.

The pictures are out of their ziplock bag and into an acid free archival quality Hollinger Metal Edge album, safely stored for future generations, if we just knew who these people were. I’ll be posting more of these photos as I get a chance, next up with be six cabinet cards from Kansas, Nebraska and Missouri – perhaps Francis or Webster kin.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Native American Connections

Family stories indicate some branches of our family tree included ancestors from the Five Civilized Tribes. There is much interest in proving Indian or Native American ancestry.  However, there are very specific criteria for proving Indian ancestry.

The Dawes Commission Roll Book, the Final Rolls of the Five Civilized Tribes, used for Certification of Degree of Indian Blood was compiled mainly during the years 1899-1906. Anyone who died before 1899 does not have a roll number. To be enrolled there were certain requirements to be met. Application had to be made during the enrollment period, showing membership in the tribe and actual residence within the area occupied by the tribe.

If the ancestor lived outside Indian Territory, they did not qualify to apply on the Dawes commission. Our Charles Wilson Buckmaster and his family were living in Indian Territory then, but I have not found any of his family names on the Dawes Roll, nor any evidence they were considered Indian. I have found no other records of other ancestors who were living in Indian Territory during the enrollment period.

Some people may never be able to prove Indian heritage. Indian law usually dictated that “when any citizen shall remove with his effects out of the limits of the Nation and become a citizen of any other government, all his rights and privileges as a citizen of the Nation shall cease,” provided nevertheless that the National Council shall have power to re-admit any such person who may at any time want to return to the Nation, but no one is entitled as an inherent right to re-admission to citizenship. If an applicant proves that at one time he was a recognized citizen of the Nation and has forfeited that citizenship, there is no law by which he can demand admission. As a matter of course, the same laws and usages governed the Dawes Commission in their consideration of claims to citizenship.

Possible Cherokee Connection

Through the Holder line, family tradition states Peter Adams Tyler met his wife-to-be, Eveline Minerva Price, at a trading post on the Mississippi River. Minerva was reportedly 1/2 or more Cherokee. Practicality would suggest that he met Minerva at a store or post in Northwest Arkansas. Eveline, born in North Carolina, followed the Cherokee routes to Arkansas, and Price is a prominent name among the Cherokee Nation. As yet, proof of her Cherokee heritage has not been found. Peter and Eveline married on July 4, 1845. They had nine children, including James Buchanan Tyler, Carl Lee Holder’s grandfather.

Possible Choctaw Connection

Through another branch of Eva Buckmaster Musgrove’s line, through a Google search, I found over twenty  pages of records where, starting on February 1, 1898, Tryphena Elizabeth McGinnis Pearcy filed a lawsuit against the Choctaw and Chickasaw Nations, declaring herself and her children as Choctaw Indians. Appeals went back and forth in the Choctaw and Chickasaw Citizenship Court in Ardmore, Indian Territory and in Tishomingo, the seat of the Southern District of the Indian Territory, until 1904, when the court ruled that the plaintiffs, Tryphena Elizabeth Pearcy and her children “were not entitled to be deemed or declared citizens of the Choctaw Nation, or to enrollment as such, or to any rights whatever flowing  therefrom.”

Copyright 2013 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

“He’s Mine” – A Valentine Story

NaDean Holder
NaDean Holder

NaDean was in the 5th grade. School had just started. NaDean and her friends, Velma and Mary, welcomed some new students – Mary Mae, Clorene and Inez. The three sisters spoke fondly of their older brother, Sonny Boy.

Sonny Boy or William, as he was later called, was 12 years old and would not be going to school that year. His daddy had broken his foot and would not be able to farm. Young William would be staying out of school to put in the crops. He used a mule and a plow to put in, as he later described, the crookedest corn rows ever, since he wasn’t big enough to keep the mule in a straight line.

Mary Mae’s stories of William intrigued the 10-year-old NaDean, who had never laid eyes on him. She turned to her friends and declared, “He’s mine.”

William Andrew Musgrove
William Andrew Musgrove

After she actually met William, NaDean stayed sweet on him all through school. When she was 15, William would ride his horse, Dixie, the five miles down to her house. They would sit on the front porch and talk, with her little brother making faces at them through the screened window. Sometimes, on Sunday afternoons they, with other friends, would ride double on horses two miles further south to swim in the Red River.

After finishing high school, William graduating the year after NaDean, they married in 1952, ten years after NaDean told her friends, “He’s mine.”

In 2012, they celebrated 60 years of marriage, along with their 5 children, 5 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren.

Family Reunion
Family Reunion

William and NaDean are my parents, but I never heard this charming story growing up. After I became interested in genealogy, all the books recommended conducting family interviews. While I couldn’t imagine learning any new family stories, I’m the kind of person that follows the rules. So I gathered some sample questions from a popular genealogy book, bought a tape recorder and scheduled an interview.

This story is just one reason I’m still conducting family interviews.

Like most things, preparing for your family interviews creates better results. Decide your focus; realizing most interviews should last no longer than an hour. Interviews can be tiring for both the interviewee and for you! Think about who else you want to interview and consider starting with the least involved person. That person could give you some insights for questions for your more significant interviews, especially if you get only one chance for that significant interview.

Write out your questions ahead of time or use a script of questions from a genealogy book. The library can be a good source for genealogy books. Your topics could start with the basics asking for birth day, date of marriage and where they lived. You could then ask the same information about their children, parents and grandparents, including any death dates and locations.

Other interview topics could be questions about cultural customs like how birthdays and holidays were celebrated; what churches were attended and how often; types of clothing worn as teenagers; what did they do for fun when they were kids; describe their first job, their first memory, their first house or how they met their spouse.

As you can, see the list is endless. Limit the use of questions requiring just a “yes” or “no” answer.  You’re looking for family stories, so don’t be in a rush to finish your list of questions. If you keep the interview pleasant and under one hour, hopefully, you can schedule a second interview.

At the start of the interview, ask permission to use a digital recorder. Start the recording with the name of the person being interviewed, your name, the date and place. Just keep the recorder running, even if the person is stopping to think.  You want to focus on the interviewee, not the technology.

Remember, if you transcribe the interview, to plan on three to four hours of transcription time for every hour of interview. If anyone has any ideas on how to transcribe faster, let me know. I’ve tried some voice recognition software, but with our Southern accents, the software was not very useful.

As a result of your efforts, future generations will be introduced to the stories and the voices knowing “He (and She are) Mine.”

You can send your feedback, comments and questions via email to  aftertoilcomesrest@andreamusgroveperisho.com or on this blog site at www.andreamusgroveperisho.com as we seek our roots together.

Andrea Musgrove Perisho is a retired health care managing director and a member of the Lee County Genealogical Society Writer’s Group. Copyright 2013 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Samuel Musgrave and Elizabeth Brand – Revolutionary War Service

Musgrave
Samuel Musgrave – Revolutionary War Patriot

Samuel was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1747. He was one of eight children born to Moses Musgrove Jr. and Elizabeth, who’s last name is unknown. He moved to Fayette County, PA., then to Muhlenburgh County, Kentucky, and finally, to Warwick County, Indiana. Samuel is the third generation of his family to live in what became the United States of America. His parents and grandparents were Quakers, who did not believe in war and fighting. So Samuel, as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, could not have participated in Quaker services, until reinstated to the Monthly Meeting, after confessing his sins. There is no evidence this ever happened.

“Samuel married Elizabeth Brand on September 10, 1767 in Pennsylvania.” Most of the information we have on him is from his Revolutionary War pension applications. The information within the quotation marks has been summarized by Richard Graham Musgrove and Samuel’s 5th great grand-daughter, Jennifer Berryman at the behest of her grandmother, Beulah Arlene Musgrove Berryman and great-aunt, Norma Ennis Musgrove Craig.

“Samuel began his military service as a Private in the Cumberland County militia. He was assigned to the 4th Battalion and served in the 8th Company. He refers to his immediate superior officer as “Captain Jack.”His first day’s march carried them toward Shippenstown, now named Shippensburg. A sixty mile march to the Susquehanna River carried them through Carlisle. He related that they “went on the river” to Lancaster County where they enjoyed a short few days of rest. Captain Jack took his men down the main road to Chester County and to Philadelphia. (When traveling through Lancaster and Chester Counties, he was traveling near the area where he was born and raised.) Crossing the Schuylkill River on a floating bridge, they arrived in Philadelphia and were given ten days rest after being assigned to barracks.

“They next traveled by sloop on the Delaware River to Trenton, New Jersey.

Revolutionary War Flag

With Long Island, New York, as their destination, they marched through Princeton and arrived in time for the battle on August 27, 1776. Approximately 3,500 colonists were under the command of Generals Washington, Sullivan, Putnam and Sterling. They suffered casualties of about 300 killed and 1,100 wounded or captured while facing a superior force of British troops. Using fog to cover their departure, the colonists crossed the East River in small boats. His unit returned to Philadelphia and, after a few days was verbally discharged and told to return to his home.

“He was welcomed with open arms by Elizabeth and four children, Huldah, Moses, Mary and Samuel Davies. During this break in his militia service, David was born. In July 1777, Samuel began another three months of service in the militia. He relates that his officers were William Duffle, George Crawford and John Cunningham who were under the command of Colonel Jonas McCoy. His company marched into Delaware and remained there a short time until General Washington moved his army back to New Port, Pennsylvania. Recrossing the Brandywine River, his company joined forces with a battalion of riflemen under a Colonel Erwin. As a part of a scouting party, Samuel was sent to Tron Hill to determine the size of the British force and their positions. (Battle of Brandywine.)

“He and others of his militia were sent to march with a group of Regulars to Chadd’s Ford where they were positioned to the right of the army for the battle which occurred on September 11, 1777. This time the colonists were more evenly matched. About 11,000 men fought under General Washington. British Generals Howe, Cornwallis and Knyphausen led about 12,500 troops and suffered 90 killed and 480 wounded or captured.

“Following the battle, Samuel’s unit returned to Philadelphia. He was ill and furloughed for two weeks. He stayed with his sister at Chadd’s Ford. Upon return to his unit, he was still too ill to travel and, since his three months were up, was discharged.

“In 1782, he was drafted again to serve his country as an Indian scout (spy-from DAR records.)Leaving behind two more children, James and Elizabeth, he served two months. Scouting in groups of five, six or seven men, they were based in a stockade fort at Hannahtown, Pennsylvania (the town had been burned by Indians) and served under Lt. Robert Ritche.

Their remaining children were born following this last term of service to his country. Sarah, Jane and William were born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania and the youngest, Ann in Monongalia County, Virginia, now West Virginia.

Samuel and Elizabeth moved to Warrick County, Indiana.”*

Samuel Musgrove was awarded a pension for his Revolutionary War Service receiving $26.66 per annum from March 4, 1821, issued December 9, 1833.

Samuel Musgrave, Revolutionary War Patriot Gravestone

Elizabeth Musgrove also applied for a pension on January 30, 1843, age 93, from Warwick County, Ind., as the widow of Samuel Musgrove, who had died on September 2, 1834. Bible records proving the birth dates of their children were filed: Huldah, b 10 June 1768; Moses, b 8 May 1770; Mary, b 22 June 1772; Samuel Davies, b 22 mar 1775; David, b 22 Nov 1776; Elizabeth, b 25 July 1781; Sarah, b 21 Nov 1783; William, b 19 May 1788; Margaret, b 17 June 1780 and Ann, b 19 Dec 1790. Their son, Moses, is our ancestor.

NOTE: In DAR records and in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly article, Samuel’s last name is listed as MUSGROVE, though other records, including gravestone, say MUSGRAVE.

Sources

*Extensive quotes for Samuel, Moses and Enos Musgrave from “The American Family Musgrove,” by Richard Graham Musgrove.

“National Genealogical Society Quarterly: Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Applications.”

Samuel Musgrove – Pension Claim W9211, PA service, Indiana Agency.; Certificate 25203. Act 7 June 1832.

“Roster of Soldiers and Patriots of the American Revolution Buried in Indiana,” Mrs. Roscoe O’Byrne, page 263 for Samuel Musgrave information.

Research of Jennifer Berryman, Beulah Arlene Musgrove Berryman and Norma Ennis Musgrove Craig.

 

DNA Testing Results – Southern European Ethnicity

As you’ve seen in a earlier post, my AncestoryDNA testing results showed 59% of my genetic ethnicity from Scandinavian, surprisingly. However, Vikings did control much of Northern Europe, so the results do make sense, as we go back in history. My next two major ethnic groups at 14% each were British Isles and Eastern European; see those earlier posts for more details. Today’s post features Southern European Ethnicity with my genetic ethnicity results in this group at 9%.  The information below is from my AncestoryDNA test results.

About Southern European Ethnicity

Modern Day Location

Italy, Spain, Portugal

Did You Know?

One of the most common Italian surnames is Russo.

About Your Region

If you had to choose one region of Europe that has wielded the most influence over the course of western history, a strong candidate would be the land of your ancestors—an area that includes modern day Italy, Spain, and Portugal.

In ancient Italy, the Romans and their empire set the stage for modern European culture. After adopting Christianity in the 4th century, the Romans spread (along with their Latin language) to all corners of their realm. Centuries later, Italy again stepped to the forefront, leading the way out of the Middle Ages as brilliant artists and philosophers like Machiavelli, Leonardo Da Vinci, and Michelangelo ushered in the Renaissance.

Spain and Portugal experienced periods of great strength and influence during the Age of Discovery. Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand II of Spain funded the voyage of Christopher Columbus to the New World in 1492, initiating an era of global colonization and great wealth and influence. Today, as a result, Spanish is the second most spoken language on Earth. Portugal kept pace with its neighbor, establishing its own colonies around the world, most notably Brazil.

In the modern era, all three counties saw tumultuous transitions from monarchies to authoritarian dictatorships to modern republics. While their modern day borders may be much smaller than in the days of their powerful empires, their legacy still reaches around the globe.

Migrations into this region

Southern Europe shares a substantial amount of genetic affinity with North Africa. This is mostly because the Iberian Peninsula was conquered by Moorish (Berber) invaders, from present-day Morocco, in about 711 C.E. Their legacy can still be seen in Spain and Portugal, ranging up to 15% in some individuals.

Migrations from this region

During the Last Glacial Period, beginning about 21,000 years ago, glaciers and windswept tundra made much of northern and central Europe uninhabitable. Populations retreated into the southern glacial refugia of Spain and Italy. Then as the climate warmed, these Mesolithic people expanded out of southern Europe to occupy the entire continent, as far north as present-day Finland. The south-to-north pattern of genetic differences in Europe is attributed to this post-glacial expansion. Additionally, Iberia was the historic source of migration into the Americas. Populations throughout the Caribbean, Latin America, southern USA and South America can trace their lineages back to Spain and Portugal, usually through their paternal side.

Copyrighted, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

DNA Results Eastern European Ethnicity

While our family stories don’t include any Eastern European origins, my DNA shows 14% Eastern European ethnicity – the same percentage as my British Isles ethnicity. Below is the Eastern European information from AncestryDNA.  

Modern Day Location

Poland, Greece, Macedonia, Slovakia, Hungary, Croatia, Romania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Ukraine, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Belarus, Moldova, Montenegro, Bulgaria, Belgarus, Kosovo

Did You Know?

The national anthem of Greece contains 158 verses, and is probably the longest.

About Your Region

Your ethnic profile points to Eastern Europe, which is a region stretching from the Baltic Sea in the north to the Mediterranean in the south. It consists primarily of former “Eastern Bloc” nations that were either aligned with or occupied by the Soviet Union during the Cold War. The Baltic states—Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania—as well as Belarus and Ukraine were annexed directly into the USSR. While Poland, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, and Bulgaria were satellite states as members of the Warsaw Pact. Also part of the region are the nations of the former Yugoslavia—Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Kosovo, and Macedonia. Albania and Greece sit at the southern end of the region, bordering the Mediterranean.

The area is considered by many ethnologists to be the homeland of the Slavic people. Most of the nations in the region speak a Slavic language, which spread north and east into Russia and south toward the Balkans in the 5th and 6th centuries.

Perhaps the most famous resident of the area is Greece. From the ancient Mycenaeans and the Homeric epics of the Trojan War to the famous cities of Athens and Thebes, the fearsome Spartans to Alexander the Great—Greek culture and history laid the foundation for Roman, European, and, ultimately, western culture as a whole.

In the 1400s, the Ottoman Turks conquered the remnants of the Byzantine Empire and throughout the 1500s expanded deep into Eastern Europe, occupying the entire southern region up to Hungary, Romania, and parts of Ukraine. As a result, there are scattered communities of Muslims in the southern countries, although Christianity is prevalent throughout the region.

Migrations into this region

After the Last Glacial Period 15,000 years ago, populations expanded onto the eastern European plain from the Balkans and Blacks Sea as ice and tundra retreated. These Eastern Europeans were the first of the Neolithic farming culture that entered the Balkans about 9,000 years ago from the Middle East. In fact, individuals from southeastern Europe have inherited a higher proportion of Middle Eastern ancestry than other European individuals. About 2,000-3,000 years ago, the ancestors of Magyars migrated from the Ural Mountains in Russia toward present-day Hungary. Although they contribute their unique language to the region, their genetic impact may have been small.

Migrations from this region

About 2,300 years ago, the height of the Eastern European influence may have been the rise of the Greeks and their Hellenistic empire following the death of Alexander the Great. Their empire encompassed Italy, Turkey and even stretched all the way to northern India. Among the southeastern populations, Greeks in particular share elevated ancestry with the Middle East, potentially due to relatively recent migrations.

Copyrighted, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

DNA Result – British Isles Ethnicity

Almost all of our ancestors arrived in American from the British Isles. Our ancestors were mostly Puritans, Quakers,  plantation owners and their indentured servants who came to Virginia and Maryland and Scots and English, who lived on either side of the border between those two countries.

A visit our ancestral lands in the British Isles would take a complete tour of all of England, the southern part of Scotland and the northern part of Ireland, where many of the Scots Irish stopped for a generation or two before traveling on American.

Below is the AncestryDNA discussion about the British Isles Ethnicity. My test results showed 14% of my ancestors had this ethnicity. See previous and future posts to learn more about our ancestors ethnicity.   

Modern Day Location

England, Ireland, Scotland, Wales

Did You Know?

The English language, predominantly spoken in this region, is descended from German settlers.

About Your Region

You’re from North-Western Europe, an area including the modern-day United Kingdom and Ireland. It is a group of islands separated from France and the rest of continental Europe by the narrow English Channel. It is the rolling, emerald-green hills of Ireland, the craggy, weathered peaks of Wales, the rich history of the city on the Thames, and the deep, mysterious lochs of Scotland.

This is where Shakespeare wrote his plays and poems. It’s home to the legends of King Arthur and Robin Hood. It’s produced some of the world’s most adventurous explorers and greatest political and military figures—George Mallory, Winston Churchill, Admiral Horatio Nelson. Brilliant scientific minds such as Sir Isaac Newton and James Clerk Maxwell laid the foundations of modern physics. And it’s the place where a rainbow can lead to a pot of gold. Maybe.

The history of the region is one of periodic invasions and settlements by various groups including the Angles and Saxons from Germany, the Jutes from Denmark, the Vikings, the Normans from northern France and, of course, the Romans. English, a Germanic language brought by the Angles, is obviously the primary language spoken. But a few of the older languages spoken by the ancient Celts still exist—a rarity in post-Roman Europe.

The people of the region have been witness to sweeping political changes and amazing technological progress through the centuries, from the Glorious Revolution to the Industrial Revolution. But despite their penchant for reform and progress, they have always found a way to preserve the past. From royal families to prime ministers, ancient languages to international diversity, from thousand-year-old cathedrals to glass skyscrapers, their culture is a fascinating blend of old and new.

Migrations into this region

Despite being a cluster of islands separated from continental Europe, Great Britain and Ireland haven’t been insulated from outsiders. Although they weren’t the first, the Celts from central Europe spread throughout the Northwest Isles about 2500 years ago. Then, as with everywhere else, the Romans came. After the Romans withdrew from the area, tribes from northern Germany and Denmark (the Angles, Saxons and Jutes) came to conquer much of what is now England. About this same time, the mighty Vikings also left their imprint, particularly in southern Scotland, Ireland and western England.

Migrations from this region

Religious and political upheaval in 17th and 18th century England played a critical role in establishing and defining early American history. Called the Great Migration, religious dissidents including the Pilgrims, Quakers, and Puritans left England seeking religious freedom and a new way of life. Although the migration was not large in overall numbers, it laid the foundation for American culture, including the concepts of church-state separation and religious tolerance.

The Great Irish Famine, also called the Potato Famine, was triggered by an outbreak of potato blight, which destroyed potato crops across Europe in the mid 1800s. Already enduring widespread poverty and massive unemployment, Ireland was hit harder than any other nation by the disaster since potatoes were a dietary staple. Ireland lost nearly a quarter of its population. Those who could leave, fled mostly to England, Australia, Canada, and the United States, creating a world-wide Irish diaspora.

Copyrighted, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Charles Wilson Buckmaster – Iowa Infantry, Union Army, private.

Charles Wilson Buckmaster was born on September 12 1843 in Coshocton, Coshocton County, Ohio. Wilson was a family name passed down from his great, great, great grandmother Mary Wilson Buckmaster, who was born in Kent County, Delaware in 1680. 

He enlisted as a private in Company E and A, 14th Regiment of the Iowa Infantry on August 30, 1862, serving in the 42nd and the 43rd Infantry.  From the regimental records, it looks like he saw a lot of action and may have been a POW. I’ve requested his military and pension records.

Service Details: The 14th Regiment, Iowa Infantry was organized at Davenport in November and mustered in November 6, 1861. Ordered to St. Louis, Mo., December, 1861. Attached  to District of Corinth, Dept. of Tennessee, to December, 1862. Davenport, Iowa, and St. Louis, Mo., to April, 1863. Cairo, Ill., District of Columbus, 6th Division, 16th Army Corps, Dept. of Tennessee, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 16th Army Corps, to December, 1864. Springfield, Ill., to August, 1865.

From Regiment records, Charles may have fought in the following battles: Fort Donelson February 12-16, 1862, where Walker Everett Todd, another ancestor fighting for the south, was captured; Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7; held center at “Hornet’s Nest” and Regiment mostly captured, paroled October 12, 1862, exchanged November 19, 1862;  Those not captured assigned to Union Brigade and participated in the advance on and seize of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 13. Duty at Corinth till August, and at Danville, Miss., till October. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-12. At Corinth until December 18. Ordered to rejoin Regiment at Davenport, Iowa, December 18. While en route participated in the defense of Jackson, Tenn., December 20, 1862, to January 4, 1863. Arrived at Davenport January 7. Reorganizing Regiment at Davenport, Iowa, and at St. Louis, Mo., till April. Moved to Cairo, Ill., April 10, and duty there till January, 1864. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss. Meridian Campaign February 3 to March 5. Meridian February 14-15. Marion February 15-17. Canton February 28. Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson’s Hill March 21. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. Cloutiersville and Cane River Crossing April 22-24. At Alexandria April 27-May 13. Moore’s Plantation May 5-7. Bayou Boeuf May 7. Bayou LaMourie May 12. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Yellow Bayou May 18-19. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., thence to Memphis, Tenn., May 20-June 10. Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6-7. Smith’s Expedition to Tupelo July 5-21. Pontotoc July 11. Camargo’s Cross Roads, near Harrisburg, July 13. Tupelo July 14-15. Old Town Creek July 15. Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Tallahatchie River August 7-9. Abbeville and Oxford August 12. Abbeville August 23. Mower’s Expedition up White River to Duvall’s Bluff September 1-7. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-October 25. (4 Cos. sent to Pilot Knob, Mo., and participated in actions at Ironton, Shut in Gap and Arcadia September 26. Fort Davidson, Pilot Knob, September 26-27. Leesburg or Harrison September 28-29.) Regiment assembled at St. Louis, Mo., November 2 and mustered out November 16, 1864. Veterans and recruits consolidated to two Companies and assigned to duty at Springfield, Ill., till August 8, 1865, when Charles was mustered out.

 His regiment lost five officers and fifty-nine enlisted men killed and mortally wounded during service and one officer and one hundred thirty eight enlisted men by disease. Total 203.

 Charles mustered out as a private of Company E on June 6, 1865 at Davenport, Iowa. Shortly after mustering out, on September 10, 1865, Charles Wilson married Mahala Hopkins.

 By 1880, the family had moved to Stafford, Kansas. It appears the family moved to Indian Territory sometime before April 7, 1885, when Andrew Jackson Buckmaster, Eva’s father, was born in Indian Territory, Oklahoma. 

 Charles died on March 18, 1919, (age 75 years) in Holdenville, Hughes County, Oklahoma, United States. He had been in Holdenville and was planning to go home to Hilltop on a local freight train. He climbed aboard the caboose which was detached from the train and fell off. He was dead when found. The doctor ruled the cause of death as a heart attack. Charles Wilson was Eva Buckmaster Musgrove’s grandfather.

 Sources

  • U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, on-line Provo, Utah.
  • Index to Compiled Military Service Records, film M541, roll 4.
  • Roster and Record of Iowa Soldiers in the War of Rebellion.
  • Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934.

Copyrighted, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Introduction

 When I first saw our family genealogy books, I was fascinated by all the names and dates, but wanted to know the stories behind the people. I didn’t take the time to start the research until last fall. This blog is a way to share the results of my work and, perhaps, work with other genealogists to build our family trees.

Included in my research is information on the social/political/economic background of the times. Researching this has been helpful to me in understanding why, such as, our ancestors moved from the British Isles on to American and then kept moving west.

I did not hear any of these stories when I was growing up and have gathered them so further generations can be aware of all our ancestors did to create this country and our families. Some of the stories are very exciting; some are heart breaking and some are shocking to us today. Our ancestors were people of their times, reflecting the customs of their current society.  We have ancestors on both sides of the Revolutionary War and on both sides of the Civil War. We have ancestors who were slave owners and, while not documented, we may well have Native American ancestors. 

The name “After Toil Comes Rest” comes from the headstone of James Monroe Elliott, Jr., the son of the Civil War soldier whose will be posted soon. James Monroe Elliott, Jr., has his own interesting stories, which I hope to research someday. 

 I do not give my permission for commercial use of this information, but feel free to use this information in your own research. 

I am fully responsible for all errors in this material. One genealogist said she now spends 40% of her time correcting her earlier research. I fully expect to have the same experience. Please let me know of any corrections or new information available, especially about our family stories.