Finding Todd, Haynes and Francis Cousins with DNA


dnaBefore DNA testing on four more known relatives is done, this week I worked on my parents Family Tree DNA autosomal testing results, looking for cousins.

For my mother, we already have DNA matches with two known distant Todd cousins and one known McIntire cousin. After assigning those known relationships in FTDNA, I was able to use the filter matches by the “in common with…” feature. First, I selected my mother and a Todd cousin. Thirty nine people came up as having the same shared DNA. Of those, six matches were estimated at 3rd or 4th cousins.

FTDNA has a feature to keep track of your notes. On all thirty-nine people, I made a note of the date and the match. Again, through FTDNA, I was able to send messages to the six matches. Many people, myself included, administer DNA accounts for others, so in the body of the message, I’ve learned to always include the name of both matches and to include my family names and geography. You get a better response than just saying “Hey, we match.”   If I do a little more work upfront, not expecting the other person to figure out the match,  I get better responses.

But before sending out messages, I went through the same “in common with…” matching process with the other Todd cousin and with the McIntire cousin, documenting all the matches in notes. Some people matched both Todd cousins and some people only matched one. A couple of people matched the Todd cousins and the McIntire cousin!

Out of a total of 115 possible matches between my mother’s DNA and her three known 3rd or 4th cousins, FTDNA identified eighteen new people as possible 3rd or 4th cousins.

From the messages to these possible cousins, within two days, I had responses from ten people – one who was able to immediately identify himself as a descendant of Walker Todd, my 4th great-grandfather. I’ve talked with my mother’s new 2nd cousin 2X removed. He’s sent me video of the Todd Cemetery in Cannon County, Tennessee, where I hope to visit someday.

As I was responding to the followup messages, I realized I needed to have my place names better organized to sort by city/county/state. When I have Oklahoma City listed in my Family Tree Maker place name as OKC, OK City, Okla. City, and Oklahoma City, those don’t sort, nor does AR, Ark., ARK, and Arkansas. It took two solid days of data entry using the “check unrecognized place names to resolve misspelling and other errors” function, which pulled up over 4500 place names to be checked. After the cleanup, I was down to 2214 place names for the 5674 people in my tree and the place sort function was now useful. (Now I need to do the people clean-up, but that’s another week.)

Another response yielded a match in our documents to a descendant of a brother of Elvira/Elmira Haynes, so we now have potential DNA identified on the Haynes line from this 3rd cousin.

So basically, in the searches, we’re looking for DNA matches where people have a documented paper trail that matches our ancestors. Then we assume the DNA comes from the documented ancestor, realizing assuming can get us in trouble. The goal is to have two or three matches showing the same gene sequence, then you can confirm the relationship.

While I was working away on my mother’s matches, I received an email from a woman about a possible match with my father’s DNA. She did a really great job of sending me her family names and dates. After trading several emails and chasing a couple of red herrings, we identified a match in our paper trails to John Riley Francis and Margaret “Peggy” Davidson – my father’s 3rd great grandparents. Mary Pennington Musgrove, my dad’s grandmother, was the daughter of Elnora Melvina Francis, who was the daughter of John Riley and Peggy. So dad has a new confirmed 4th cousin.

Now I can run the “in common with…” feature in FTDNA for each of my parents and their new cousins to find more new cousins and hope for responses. That will keep me busy until other four kits are completed, but now, I need to get back to work for my study group covering Mastering Genealogical Proof and then download and label documents off the flippal and camera from my summer research trips – a different kind of fun than working with DNA testing.1

1. Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013).

 
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

 

Photo Tour of Stone County, Arkansas

In the 1800s,  Stone County, Arkansas was home to our Eoffs, Eliotts, McIntires and Todds. Last week, two fourth cousins gave me a grand tour of Stone County. My gracious hosts were Alfred Via  and Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via, recently married and 3rd cousins themselves. Alfred was raised in Bickle’s Cove and while Pauline is a proud Texan, she has done enough genealogy research in the area to feel like a native.

For those of you that recognize Pauline’s name, she is the author of The McIntires and the Elliotts of Bickle’s Cove, Stone County, Arkansas and descendents of John McIntire of Maury County, Tennessee. She still has a few copies left, a great hardback book with over 500 pages of research and source documents. Let me know if you want to purchase the book and I’ll put you in touch with Pauline. The book is $65. I was able to use the documentation in the book for my successful DAR application with Jacob Eoff as the patriot ancestor.

Here is the photo tour, which included the McIntire cabin on private property. We had permission to visit the site. In the winter, with no leaves on the trees, I’m told the cabin is visible from the road. Even with bug spray, we got chiggers and ticks. Didn’t see any snakes, though!

John and Mary Jane McIntire lived in this cabin, where my great-grandfather Hendrix McIntire was raised. Stories indicate John McIntire was a stone mason. The old stone fireplace is still straight and strong, as is the foundation to the cabin, though the cabin may not last much longer. 

McIntire Cabin, Stone County, AR with Pauline and Alfred Via. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire Cabin, Stone County, AR with Pauline and Alfred Via. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Front of McIntire Cabin. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho
Front of McIntire Cabin. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Well at McIntire Cabin. Well has filled in. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Well at McIntire Cabin. Well has filled in. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Straight fireplace, McIntire Cabin, June 2013, photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Straight fireplace, McIntire Cabin, June 2013, photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire cabin - thistle's growing around cabin. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire cabin – thistle’s growing around cabin. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Bickles Cove Cemetery

Alfred Via holding Bickle's Cove Cemetery sign, which was torn off by a backhoe. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via holding Bickle’s Cove Cemetery sign, which was torn off by a backhoe. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via with Samuel and Elizabeth Eoff crypts. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via with Samuel and Elizabeth Eoff crypts. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire headstone. Bickle's Cove Cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire headstone. Bickle’s Cove Cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via pointing to his mother's name, where children are listed on back of McIntire headstone. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via pointing out a name, where children are listed on back of McIntire headstone. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Old McIntire Lane. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Old McIntire Lane. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Creek near cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Creek near cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Mountain View, Stone County, Arkansas is in the scenic Ozarks, well worth the trip for the scenery alone, but when you add the family connections, the area is even more special. In a later blog, we’ll visit the court house.

 
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Land Records

Yesterday, I listened to a recorded webinar on Using the Bureau of Land Management Tract Books by Michael John Neill. [Read this only if you need instructions on how to get to the sites. To go to website, right click on underlined link and select open link in a new tab. Look at the top of your computer screen to see the new tab. Click on it. When you are on his site, on the right, see all the webinars he has available. If you are interested in buying some of his webinars, join his blog site and wait for the frequent sales.]

I’ve spent all my spare time since then on the Bureau of Land Management site. I’ve found what may have been my great great grandfather’s, Charles Wilson Buckmaster, original homestead in Oklahoma in 1903. (Or maybe not since it’s in Washita County, in western Oklahoma. However, that could have been the only available land and he rented it out. More research is needed to figure out if he’s our Charles Wilson Buckmaster.)

I found lots of Arkansas records on the Eoffs, Holders, Tylers, McIntires and Mays, with several Holder men who may be contemporaries of Spencer and Joseph. Maybe further research of these lines will help break down that Holder brick wall. 

The Bureau of Land Management has over 5 million Federal land title records issued since 1820, but not every state has been micofilmed. Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kansas and Missouri look pretty complete. In Texas, only two counties are on the website. That was disappointing. Kentucky and Tennessee don’t have many records on the site, either. From the header on the site home page, it looks like Nebraska records will be available soon.

If you, like me, have Scots Irish and other ancestors who were farmers moving west with the frontier, this free site is worth checking out. If you get bogged down on the site, it’s worth spending the $6 or so for Mr. Neill’s webinar.

Genealogy Bank is a new site with millions of available newspaper clippings. I joined after hearing great reviews. I found no newspaper clippings from my Oklahoma, Texas or Arkansas relatives on that site. So if your ancestors are from the rural areas of those states, wait a little while and check on their coverage before spending your dollars on this site. 

Good luck seeking your own roots.

Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

SCOTS-IRISH

Since before Roman times in 200 A.D., the border between England and Scotland was in almost constant warfare.  The people, whether English (like the Musgrave’s) or Scottish (like the Knox’s, McIntire’s), were living in a war zone. The men were warrior-like and often away at battle. With the men away, the women raised the many children and took care of the household and farm, as soldiers trampled crops and rustlers stole livestock. The extended family or clan was the only unit worth any loyalty.

Each family had a few acres where they raised their own food and grazed livestock. Families moved often. Their home was a simple building, built in a day, with few household possessions. As rents increased in the borderlands, Scots-Irish were encouraged to migrate to northern Ireland. Soon rents increased in Ireland and their farming/ grazing lifestyle was no longer economically feasible in Ireland.

When the first Scots-Irish first arrived in Pennsylvania about 1717, their behavior, provocative dress, and speech were very different from the Quakers, so they were rejected, ridiculed, and called “Scots-Irish”. In spite of their poverty, they were a proud people, which further irritated the Quakers. The Scots-Irish settled on the frontier of Pennsylvania and; when the roads south opened, they went down into the Shenandoah Valley to the Carolinas. Later migrations to America in 1760-1775 were directly to the Carolinas. The Scot-Irish families continued the old patterns of life first on the frontier, then to Tennessee,  and further west to Arkansas, Texas, and Oklahoma.  Since the Scots-Irish way of life was successful on the frontier, other frontier immigrants took on those characteristics, still seen today.

Weddings were wild affairs, full of ritual, and expensive. Sometimes brides were abducted, usually (but not always) willingly. First cousins often married to “keep it in the clan”. There was a shortage of clergy  and sometimes couples got tired of waiting. Premarital pregnancies were common and not scandalous. Most of the original Scots-Irish were Presbyterian, but became Baptists and Methodists as their population and migration outgrew the Presbyterian seminaries capacity to provide ministers.

Families were male dominant; women and children were to obey. Children, especially boys, were taught to exercise their wills. The Scots-Irish doted on their male children, reared to have pride, independence, and courage. Girls were taught the virtues of patience, industry, sacrifice, and devotion to others. Men shared in the care of their children from infancy. Corporal punishment was often used.

Formal education wasn’t important to the Scots-Irish, the most illiterate group. The main occupation was farming combined with herd grazing. There was no class system with everyone seen as equal. As in Scotland, this group moved often, creating scattered, isolated settlements, along creeks and streams.

Source

  • “Albion’s Seed, Four British Folkways in America,” David Hackett Fischer, 1989.
  • “Born Fighting – How the Scots-Irish Shaped America,” James Webb, 2004.

Copyrighted, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Introduction

 When I first saw our family genealogy books, I was fascinated by all the names and dates, but wanted to know the stories behind the people. I didn’t take the time to start the research until last fall. This blog is a way to share the results of my work and, perhaps, work with other genealogists to build our family trees.

Included in my research is information on the social/political/economic background of the times. Researching this has been helpful to me in understanding why, such as, our ancestors moved from the British Isles on to American and then kept moving west.

I did not hear any of these stories when I was growing up and have gathered them so further generations can be aware of all our ancestors did to create this country and our families. Some of the stories are very exciting; some are heart breaking and some are shocking to us today. Our ancestors were people of their times, reflecting the customs of their current society.  We have ancestors on both sides of the Revolutionary War and on both sides of the Civil War. We have ancestors who were slave owners and, while not documented, we may well have Native American ancestors. 

The name “After Toil Comes Rest” comes from the headstone of James Monroe Elliott, Jr., the son of the Civil War soldier whose will be posted soon. James Monroe Elliott, Jr., has his own interesting stories, which I hope to research someday. 

 I do not give my permission for commercial use of this information, but feel free to use this information in your own research. 

I am fully responsible for all errors in this material. One genealogist said she now spends 40% of her time correcting her earlier research. I fully expect to have the same experience. Please let me know of any corrections or new information available, especially about our family stories.