Samuel Musgrave – Revolutionary War Soldier and “Indian Spy” #5 in 52 Ancestors

Musgrave
Picture given to Norma Ennis Craig Musgrove by a relative stating the subject was Samuel Musgrave. Does anyone have proof of this?Samue

Samuel Musgrave (Musgrove) was a Revolutionary War soldier who fought under General Washington in the Battle of Brandywine. The battle between the Americans and the British army under General Howe took place on September 11, 1777 near Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. The British won the battle, eventually capturing Philadelphia on September 26 and occupying that city until June 1778.[1]

Based on the research of Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via and others, along with my research, I was accepted into the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) with Jacob Eoff as my ancestor. Follow these links to see earlier posts on the Eoffs and Palatine Germans.

Samuel Musgrove was just approved by the DAR as a supplemental patriot for me. Norma Ennis Craig Musgrove did the research linking her grandfather William Tate Musgrave (Musgrove) to Samuel. Norma was a DAR member herself.

You’ve probably noticed the two different spellings of Samuel’s and William Tate’s last name. William Tate used the spelling Musgrave in his early days, then Musgrove later in life. One family genealogist speculated the spelling was changed to differentiate the child from his first wife from the children by his second wife. Pure speculation, but the timing is about right. Samuel Musgrave’s Quaker parents and grandparents generally used Musgrave as did Samuel’s children. The DAR database is about the only place I’ve seen Samuel’s name spelling Musgrove.

Samuel was the fourth generation of his line in the United States.[2] He was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1747 and died on 2 Sept 1833 in Warrick County, Indiana at 87 years of age.[3] He married Elizabeth Brand in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania on 10 Sept 1767.[4] She was born in Pennsylvania about 1750 and died about 1843 in Warrick County, Indiana.[5]

Samuel enlisted in July 1776 in Cannonkackick Settlement, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and served three months.[6] In 1782, he served twelve more months as an “Indian Spy” under Lt. Robert Ritchie in Pennsylvania Troops.[7] Much of this information is in Samuel’s Proof Pension Claim W.9211.[8] On 30 Dec 1834, Elizabeth filed for a widow’s pension.[9]

Many of the Native Americans had treaties with the British, whom they supported during the war.[10]An Indian Spy patrolled the trails along the frontier warning the settlers of impending attacks.[11] Generally the spys or scouts were divided into pairs, with each pair assigned a section of the frontier were war paths were watched.[12] The spys were not an attack force, but warned the settlers so they could prepare for defense. [13] The men carried their supplies on their backs, slept on the ground and foraged for food living off deer and bear meat.[14] This was a very different life from Samuel’s Quaker relatives who stayed in settled areas, especially considering the pacifist Quaker beliefs. Follow these links to see previous blogs on Samuel Musgrave and Moses Musgrave.

DAR Logo
DAR Logo

If you are a woman over the age of 18 years and descended from either my McIntire/Eoff line or  Musgrave line, you are eligible for DAR membership. If you are interested, contact me for my DAR number and contact your local DAR chapter for more details.[15] Since the research has been done on those lines, you’ll need to collect fewer documents to prove your lineage. For the men, the same information can be used to apply for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution.



[1] Wikipedia, Battle of Brandywine, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Brandywine : accessed 27 Feb 2014.)

[2] Musgrove, Duane and Marie Wilson, A History of the Moses Musgrave Family, Quakers, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Kansas and Further West (Indiana, Evansville Bindery, Inc, 1998), p 11.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Ibid.

[10] Zeigler, Fred, Cook’s Old Mill, ( http://www.cooksoldmill.com/text/article-jcook.html : accessed 27 Feb 2014). Clinch Scouts, (http://vagenweb.org/lee/ClinchScoutsMA.html : accessed 27 Feb 2014).

[11] Ibid.

[12] Ibid.

[13] Ibid

[14] Ibid.

[15] National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, (http://www.dar.org/default.cfm : accessed 27 Feb 2014).

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Photo Tour of Stone County, Arkansas

In the 1800s,  Stone County, Arkansas was home to our Eoffs, Eliotts, McIntires and Todds. Last week, two fourth cousins gave me a grand tour of Stone County. My gracious hosts were Alfred Via  and Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via, recently married and 3rd cousins themselves. Alfred was raised in Bickle’s Cove and while Pauline is a proud Texan, she has done enough genealogy research in the area to feel like a native.

For those of you that recognize Pauline’s name, she is the author of The McIntires and the Elliotts of Bickle’s Cove, Stone County, Arkansas and descendents of John McIntire of Maury County, Tennessee. She still has a few copies left, a great hardback book with over 500 pages of research and source documents. Let me know if you want to purchase the book and I’ll put you in touch with Pauline. The book is $65. I was able to use the documentation in the book for my successful DAR application with Jacob Eoff as the patriot ancestor.

Here is the photo tour, which included the McIntire cabin on private property. We had permission to visit the site. In the winter, with no leaves on the trees, I’m told the cabin is visible from the road. Even with bug spray, we got chiggers and ticks. Didn’t see any snakes, though!

John and Mary Jane McIntire lived in this cabin, where my great-grandfather Hendrix McIntire was raised. Stories indicate John McIntire was a stone mason. The old stone fireplace is still straight and strong, as is the foundation to the cabin, though the cabin may not last much longer. 

McIntire Cabin, Stone County, AR with Pauline and Alfred Via. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire Cabin, Stone County, AR with Pauline and Alfred Via. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Front of McIntire Cabin. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho
Front of McIntire Cabin. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Well at McIntire Cabin. Well has filled in. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Well at McIntire Cabin. Well has filled in. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Straight fireplace, McIntire Cabin, June 2013, photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Straight fireplace, McIntire Cabin, June 2013, photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire cabin - thistle's growing around cabin. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire cabin – thistle’s growing around cabin. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Bickles Cove Cemetery

Alfred Via holding Bickle's Cove Cemetery sign, which was torn off by a backhoe. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via holding Bickle’s Cove Cemetery sign, which was torn off by a backhoe. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via with Samuel and Elizabeth Eoff crypts. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via with Samuel and Elizabeth Eoff crypts. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire headstone. Bickle's Cove Cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire headstone. Bickle’s Cove Cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via pointing to his mother's name, where children are listed on back of McIntire headstone. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via pointing out a name, where children are listed on back of McIntire headstone. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Old McIntire Lane. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Old McIntire Lane. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Creek near cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Creek near cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Mountain View, Stone County, Arkansas is in the scenic Ozarks, well worth the trip for the scenery alone, but when you add the family connections, the area is even more special. In a later blog, we’ll visit the court house.

 
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Eoff – Jacob, Peter and Isaac: Three Generations of Patriots

Revolutionary War Flag

In an earlier post, we discussed the Palatine German migration and our first ancestor, Han Jacob Eoff who died in 1710 while still in quarantine on Governor’s Island, New York. His widow, Magdalena was listed with two children, John Jacob Offin age 8, and Anna Barbara Offin age 6. Magdalena  and the children somehow avoided the work camps. She married Joan Peter Kassener (John Peter Castner) in New York  April 2, 1711. (The Eoffs were ancestors of Edith McIntire Holder.)

In 1734, Johan Jacob Öff purchased 432 acres in Somerset County, New Jersey. There Jacob Öff/Eoff built a large tavern/inn which was well known for its soft beds and warm hospitality. It remained in the family for several generations. Jacob also donated the land and money to build Zion Lutheran Church, the cornerstone of which still stands today. The small town that built up around the Eoff tavern was called Pluckemin, supposedly so named because of Jacob’s talent at ‘Plucking them in’…

The most famous patron of the inn was George Washington, who leading a bedraggled but victorious army stopped at the Inn on January 5, 1777 to write to Congress and tell them of his victory at Princeton, New Jersey.

One of the first Masonic Lodges, Solomon’s Lodge No 1 F&A&M, Somverville, New Jersey, was organized in the barn of Christian Eoff, one of Jacob’s sons.   

Jacob Eoff died in Pluckemin, Somerset County, New Jersey on September 9, 1780. His wife was Marie Magdalen Spohnheimer.

Revolutionary War Records for New Jersey show that Jacob Öff took the loyalty oath and served as a private soldier. DAR records show he provided supplies to the Revolutionary Army. His DAR patriot number is A037036. He is listed in the Somerset County, New Jersey censuses of 1775 and 1779.

Johann Jacob Öff’s will is on file in the courthouse at Trenton, New Jersey. His estate was estimated at 13,000 pounds and included nine bound books and six unbound books! Who could imagine a small boy coming to America, with his father dead on Governor’s Island, leaving an estate valued over $1,120,000 in 2012 US dollars, as well as having a library of books!

Peter Eoff: DAR Patriot Number – A204951

Peter was born in Bridgewater, Somerset County, New Jersey in about 1734. He married Elizabeth, last name unknown, in 1760 in Somerset County, New Jersey. They had nine children. He managed the Inn for a while after his brother, Christian.

 We don’t know why the family left the relative comfort of New Jersey, but by 1780, they were on the frontier in Camden District, South Carolina. When Peter was drafted, his son Isaac served as his substitute. This was a common practice, with more experienced men staying home to work the fields and manage the livestock. Peter did serve in the militia in 1780 under Captain Jones. Peter died on December 5, 1788, in Madison County, Kentucky at the age of 54. Elizabeth lived in the same area until she died in 1805 at the age of 71.

Isaac Eoff gravestone

Isaac Eoff: DAR Patriot Number – A033811

Isaac was born on January 12, 1761 in Somerset County, New Jersey. He first served in the Revolutionary War, when he was sixteen years of age, in the place of his father who was drafted in Chester County, South Carolina. He served for four months at Charleston under Captain John Mills in Sumpter’s regiment. He then enlisted for ten months in a company commanded by Captain Mills who joined Sumpter. He served four months under Alexander Fagin , was in battle when Sumpter was defeated was in the battles of Fish Dam Ford, Blackstock and Eutaw Springs where he was taken prisoner. He served a total of 201 days. In almost all his tours of duty, he served with one of James Knox’ sons or sons-in-law. We’re not sure when or where he met Margaret Knox, but we’re glad they met. They married on March 12, 1783. They went on to have eight children, all born in South Carolina. In 1810, the family moved to Pulaski County, Kentucky. By 1840, they were in Cannon County, Tennessee.

Isaac died on October 2, 1841. His white marble headstone is located in the Civil War Cemetery in Coffee County, Tennessee just off I-24 at Beech Grove exit at Highway 64. Exit off toward Beech Grove, the cemetery is on the left on a small knoll. The Civil War Cemetery is older than the Civil War. The name was changed after the War because of the many Civil War solders buried there, most with no names on their headstones. This is a federal cemetery and well kept, very pretty and peaceful.

After his death, Margaret moved with most of her children to Carroll County, Arkansas, where she died in 1848, far away from Ireland where she was born.

 This family represents one of the few families I’ve seen, who have three generations of patriots in support of the Revolutionary War.

DAR Logo

My DAR application through Isaac Eoff is pending. If my application is approved, if you are a woman in this family line within three generations of me, you can apply to DAR using a short form. Let me know if you have question. amp

 

Sources

  • “A Study of the German Immigrants Who Arrived in Colonial New York in 1710″ Published 1985. This set includes two pages of data on the Off family–see p. 713 of Volume II
  • “The Palatine Families of New York” by Henry Z. Jones, Jr.
  • Peter Eoff – provided a substitute, his son, Isaac. Captain Jones, militia; “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in American Revolution,” AA. 2232A L325. SC Arch Acct. Aud #1004, Roll #4842, SR3362V-pension of Isaac Eoff.
  • Isaac Eoff -National Archives file #3362; served in the army from Chester Co SC #326, Book L. “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in American Revolution,” AA. 2232A L325.

Copyright, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.