Photo Tour of Stone County, Arkansas

In the 1800s,  Stone County, Arkansas was home to our Eoffs, Eliotts, McIntires and Todds. Last week, two fourth cousins gave me a grand tour of Stone County. My gracious hosts were Alfred Via  and Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via, recently married and 3rd cousins themselves. Alfred was raised in Bickle’s Cove and while Pauline is a proud Texan, she has done enough genealogy research in the area to feel like a native.

For those of you that recognize Pauline’s name, she is the author of The McIntires and the Elliotts of Bickle’s Cove, Stone County, Arkansas and descendents of John McIntire of Maury County, Tennessee. She still has a few copies left, a great hardback book with over 500 pages of research and source documents. Let me know if you want to purchase the book and I’ll put you in touch with Pauline. The book is $65. I was able to use the documentation in the book for my successful DAR application with Jacob Eoff as the patriot ancestor.

Here is the photo tour, which included the McIntire cabin on private property. We had permission to visit the site. In the winter, with no leaves on the trees, I’m told the cabin is visible from the road. Even with bug spray, we got chiggers and ticks. Didn’t see any snakes, though!

John and Mary Jane McIntire lived in this cabin, where my great-grandfather Hendrix McIntire was raised. Stories indicate John McIntire was a stone mason. The old stone fireplace is still straight and strong, as is the foundation to the cabin, though the cabin may not last much longer. 

McIntire Cabin, Stone County, AR with Pauline and Alfred Via. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire Cabin, Stone County, AR with Pauline and Alfred Via. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Front of McIntire Cabin. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho
Front of McIntire Cabin. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Well at McIntire Cabin. Well has filled in. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Well at McIntire Cabin. Well has filled in. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Straight fireplace, McIntire Cabin, June 2013, photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Straight fireplace, McIntire Cabin, June 2013, photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire cabin - thistle's growing around cabin. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire cabin – thistle’s growing around cabin. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Bickles Cove Cemetery

Alfred Via holding Bickle's Cove Cemetery sign, which was torn off by a backhoe. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via holding Bickle’s Cove Cemetery sign, which was torn off by a backhoe. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via with Samuel and Elizabeth Eoff crypts. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via with Samuel and Elizabeth Eoff crypts. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire headstone. Bickle's Cove Cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
McIntire headstone. Bickle’s Cove Cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via pointing to his mother's name, where children are listed on back of McIntire headstone. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Alfred Via pointing out a name, where children are listed on back of McIntire headstone. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Old McIntire Lane. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Old McIntire Lane. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Creek near cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.
Creek near cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Mountain View, Stone County, Arkansas is in the scenic Ozarks, well worth the trip for the scenery alone, but when you add the family connections, the area is even more special. In a later blog, we’ll visit the court house.

 
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Land Records

Yesterday, I listened to a recorded webinar on Using the Bureau of Land Management Tract Books by Michael John Neill. [Read this only if you need instructions on how to get to the sites. To go to website, right click on underlined link and select open link in a new tab. Look at the top of your computer screen to see the new tab. Click on it. When you are on his site, on the right, see all the webinars he has available. If you are interested in buying some of his webinars, join his blog site and wait for the frequent sales.]

I’ve spent all my spare time since then on the Bureau of Land Management site. I’ve found what may have been my great great grandfather’s, Charles Wilson Buckmaster, original homestead in Oklahoma in 1903. (Or maybe not since it’s in Washita County, in western Oklahoma. However, that could have been the only available land and he rented it out. More research is needed to figure out if he’s our Charles Wilson Buckmaster.)

I found lots of Arkansas records on the Eoffs, Holders, Tylers, McIntires and Mays, with several Holder men who may be contemporaries of Spencer and Joseph. Maybe further research of these lines will help break down that Holder brick wall. 

The Bureau of Land Management has over 5 million Federal land title records issued since 1820, but not every state has been micofilmed. Oklahoma, Arkansas, Kansas and Missouri look pretty complete. In Texas, only two counties are on the website. That was disappointing. Kentucky and Tennessee don’t have many records on the site, either. From the header on the site home page, it looks like Nebraska records will be available soon.

If you, like me, have Scots Irish and other ancestors who were farmers moving west with the frontier, this free site is worth checking out. If you get bogged down on the site, it’s worth spending the $6 or so for Mr. Neill’s webinar.

Genealogy Bank is a new site with millions of available newspaper clippings. I joined after hearing great reviews. I found no newspaper clippings from my Oklahoma, Texas or Arkansas relatives on that site. So if your ancestors are from the rural areas of those states, wait a little while and check on their coverage before spending your dollars on this site. 

Good luck seeking your own roots.

Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Knox Craig Eoff Families after the Revolutionary War

By 1783, James Knox Sr., at the age of seventy, was made Justice of the Peace in Chester County, South Carolina, four years before he died. A copy of his signature, with JP for Justice of the Peace after his signature, is in the Petersen/Lyle book, so he was literate.

 With the disruptions of the moves from Scotland to Ireland, then to the frontier, James and Elizabeth’s  children were probably not literate; their pension applications were signed with their mark. Illiteracy was almost the norm in Scots-Irish, as people moved west ahead of schools and churches. This lack of education led to a distrust of bankers, lawyers, politicians, even preachers who could read, since, in their experience, most of the educated people just tried to take advantage of them, still leading to a distrust of education in some parts of the county. By the Civil War, more people could read and write.

In October 1786, James and Elizabeth sold their Royal Grant and divided the proceeds among their heirs. The 450 acres sold for the 2012 equivalent of $90 US dollars. Sometime 1787, James Sr. died.

In 1788, Elizabeth Craig Knox moved to Crab Orchard, Madison County, Kentucky with some of her childrens’ families (Samuel Morrow, Robert Knox, Samuel Knox, Isaac Eoff and Jacob Sutton) in a train of six wagons. The families of John Gaston Jr., Jannet Miller Knox and William Knox stayed in South Carolina.  The Robert Knox and Jacob Sutton families stayed at Crab Orchard. John Knox with his mother Elizabeth, along with the Samuel Knox and Samuel Morrow families, moved to the southern part of Lincoln County which is now Pulaski County. The Isaac Eoff family moved northward into Madison County.

Sometime in 1809, Robert Knox when back to South Carolina to settle his wife’s estate. Upon his return, he invited Nellie, his niece, to return home with him on the extra horse. With the arrangement made, Nellie rode side-saddle all the way to Frankfort. While in Kentucky, she also visited her uncle Samuel Knox. There she met her cousin William. In October, they were married with another uncle Samuel Morrow as bondsman. At the time of their marriage, William was almost 21 and Eleanor (Nellie) was 24.

In 1812, at the age of 93, Elizabeth Craig Knox, traveled with her daughter Ann’s family again, moving to Puncheon Camp Creek, Garrison Fork, Duck River, Bedford County, Tennessee in another wagon train. Included in the caravan were her daughters’ families – Elizabeth Morrow, Margaret and Ann Sutton and most of the others who had left South Carolina. John, at sixty seven, and Robert stayed in Crab Orchard.

In 1822, at the age of 103, Elizabeth Craig Knox died in Puncheon Camp Creek, Tennessee. She was probably living in a log cabin, with Ann and Jacob Sutton, at the time of her death. She is thought to be buried in Stevenson Cemetery, in an unmarked grave, as was the custom in that day. She was a very long way from her comfortable place of birth, probably as an educated Lady in sophisticated Edinburgh, Scotland to the frontier of a county which didn’t even exist at the time of her birth.

In December 1826, Isaac Eoff had surveyed 25 acres in Warren County, Tennessee warrant #2031 and 50 acres surveyed on warrant #1233, adding to land already owned. The new land may have been land grants for his Revolutionary War service.

On Aug 7, 1832 while living in Rutherford County, Tennessee, Isaac applied for a Revolutionary War pension in the courts of Bedford County, Tennessee. The pension was approved and he drew $60.00 per year. He and Margaret had eight children. One of their sons, John W. (Go Back) Eoff, is our direct ancestor.

John W. (Go Back) Eoff was born on March 15, 1795, in Madison County, Kentucky and  died about 1867 in Carroll County, Arkansas. First, John may have been married to Mary Jane last name unknown but perhaps Knox, who died after the birth of her first or second child. Shortly afterwards, he married Lucy Shaw, born March 10, 1804; she died between 1867 and 1870 in Boone County, Arkansas.   John became known as “Go Back” Eoff because he couldn’t seem to decide just where he wanted to live. It is said that he returned to Tennessee after the move to Arkansas, then returned to Izard County, Arkansas and was there when his mother Margaret died in 1849, then back to Carroll or Boone County. He is said to even moved to Texas for awhile!

Lucy Shaw’s parents haven’t been proven. It is thought by some genealogists that Lucy was the daughter of Christopher Shaw of South Carolina and Bedford County, Tennessee, where there are no courthouse records before 1850 due to a fire. Christopher Shaw deeded land to his three surviving sons. On the deed of land in Bedford County, Tennessee from Christopher Shaw to John Eoff no mention is made of any relationship. Lucy is believed to have been borne in Kentucky, but there is no proof. Christopher Shaw is a proven DAR patriot through his three sons. The three sons’ names are spelled out in full detail in the deeds from their father and mother. No daughters are listed in the deeds for him, although on the 1800 Edgefield District, South Carolina census there was a young female in his household at the time. More research needs to be done in Edgefield District, South Carolina to see just when Christopher Shaw sold his holding there. If he sold out between 1800-1804 then it is quite possible he did go to Kentucky before making the final move to Bedford County, Tennessee. (Details in this paragraph by Pauline Mitchell Pierce.)

In 1841, a wagon train comprising the families of John, Samuel, William and Alexander Eoff made their way through Tennessee, across the Mississippi, into Northwest Arkansas. John dropped from the train in Izard County, with the rest of the family settling in Carroll County, where Margaret Knox Eoff passed away on Sept 26, 1848 at the age of 85. Her remains are buried in the Eoff Cemetery near Harrison, (now) Boone County, Arkansas. Her husband, Isaac, the 3rd generation of Revolutionary War patriots died 1841. (See his headstone and details in the previous Revolutionary War section.)

Sources

  • “Knox, James Knox, Sr. and Elizabeth Craig Knox and their Descendants,” compiled by Lorene K. Petersen and Jennie Bell Lyle, 1984 for much of the material in this Knox section.
  • “The McIntires and the Elliotts of Bickle’s Cove, Stone County, Arkansas and the descendents of John McIntire of Maury County, Tennessee,” by Pauline Mitchell Pierce, January 1997.

Eoff – Jacob, Peter and Isaac: Three Generations of Patriots

Revolutionary War Flag

In an earlier post, we discussed the Palatine German migration and our first ancestor, Han Jacob Eoff who died in 1710 while still in quarantine on Governor’s Island, New York. His widow, Magdalena was listed with two children, John Jacob Offin age 8, and Anna Barbara Offin age 6. Magdalena  and the children somehow avoided the work camps. She married Joan Peter Kassener (John Peter Castner) in New York  April 2, 1711. (The Eoffs were ancestors of Edith McIntire Holder.)

In 1734, Johan Jacob Öff purchased 432 acres in Somerset County, New Jersey. There Jacob Öff/Eoff built a large tavern/inn which was well known for its soft beds and warm hospitality. It remained in the family for several generations. Jacob also donated the land and money to build Zion Lutheran Church, the cornerstone of which still stands today. The small town that built up around the Eoff tavern was called Pluckemin, supposedly so named because of Jacob’s talent at ‘Plucking them in’…

The most famous patron of the inn was George Washington, who leading a bedraggled but victorious army stopped at the Inn on January 5, 1777 to write to Congress and tell them of his victory at Princeton, New Jersey.

One of the first Masonic Lodges, Solomon’s Lodge No 1 F&A&M, Somverville, New Jersey, was organized in the barn of Christian Eoff, one of Jacob’s sons.   

Jacob Eoff died in Pluckemin, Somerset County, New Jersey on September 9, 1780. His wife was Marie Magdalen Spohnheimer.

Revolutionary War Records for New Jersey show that Jacob Öff took the loyalty oath and served as a private soldier. DAR records show he provided supplies to the Revolutionary Army. His DAR patriot number is A037036. He is listed in the Somerset County, New Jersey censuses of 1775 and 1779.

Johann Jacob Öff’s will is on file in the courthouse at Trenton, New Jersey. His estate was estimated at 13,000 pounds and included nine bound books and six unbound books! Who could imagine a small boy coming to America, with his father dead on Governor’s Island, leaving an estate valued over $1,120,000 in 2012 US dollars, as well as having a library of books!

Peter Eoff: DAR Patriot Number – A204951

Peter was born in Bridgewater, Somerset County, New Jersey in about 1734. He married Elizabeth, last name unknown, in 1760 in Somerset County, New Jersey. They had nine children. He managed the Inn for a while after his brother, Christian.

 We don’t know why the family left the relative comfort of New Jersey, but by 1780, they were on the frontier in Camden District, South Carolina. When Peter was drafted, his son Isaac served as his substitute. This was a common practice, with more experienced men staying home to work the fields and manage the livestock. Peter did serve in the militia in 1780 under Captain Jones. Peter died on December 5, 1788, in Madison County, Kentucky at the age of 54. Elizabeth lived in the same area until she died in 1805 at the age of 71.

Isaac Eoff gravestone

Isaac Eoff: DAR Patriot Number – A033811

Isaac was born on January 12, 1761 in Somerset County, New Jersey. He first served in the Revolutionary War, when he was sixteen years of age, in the place of his father who was drafted in Chester County, South Carolina. He served for four months at Charleston under Captain John Mills in Sumpter’s regiment. He then enlisted for ten months in a company commanded by Captain Mills who joined Sumpter. He served four months under Alexander Fagin , was in battle when Sumpter was defeated was in the battles of Fish Dam Ford, Blackstock and Eutaw Springs where he was taken prisoner. He served a total of 201 days. In almost all his tours of duty, he served with one of James Knox’ sons or sons-in-law. We’re not sure when or where he met Margaret Knox, but we’re glad they met. They married on March 12, 1783. They went on to have eight children, all born in South Carolina. In 1810, the family moved to Pulaski County, Kentucky. By 1840, they were in Cannon County, Tennessee.

Isaac died on October 2, 1841. His white marble headstone is located in the Civil War Cemetery in Coffee County, Tennessee just off I-24 at Beech Grove exit at Highway 64. Exit off toward Beech Grove, the cemetery is on the left on a small knoll. The Civil War Cemetery is older than the Civil War. The name was changed after the War because of the many Civil War solders buried there, most with no names on their headstones. This is a federal cemetery and well kept, very pretty and peaceful.

After his death, Margaret moved with most of her children to Carroll County, Arkansas, where she died in 1848, far away from Ireland where she was born.

 This family represents one of the few families I’ve seen, who have three generations of patriots in support of the Revolutionary War.

DAR Logo

My DAR application through Isaac Eoff is pending. If my application is approved, if you are a woman in this family line within three generations of me, you can apply to DAR using a short form. Let me know if you have question. amp

 

Sources

  • “A Study of the German Immigrants Who Arrived in Colonial New York in 1710″ Published 1985. This set includes two pages of data on the Off family–see p. 713 of Volume II
  • “The Palatine Families of New York” by Henry Z. Jones, Jr.
  • Peter Eoff – provided a substitute, his son, Isaac. Captain Jones, militia; “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in American Revolution,” AA. 2232A L325. SC Arch Acct. Aud #1004, Roll #4842, SR3362V-pension of Isaac Eoff.
  • Isaac Eoff -National Archives file #3362; served in the army from Chester Co SC #326, Book L. “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in American Revolution,” AA. 2232A L325.

Copyright, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

PALATINE GERMANS AND OUR FIRST EOFF’S IN AMERICA

 

Flag of Germany

Generations of wars and heavy taxation in southern Germany plus a severe winter in 1709 caused devastation in the land and impoverished the people, making many families seek relief by migrating.

They were called “Palatines” as most were from the Palatinate region of Germany. One group left in 1708, but a larger group left in 1709. They traveled down the Rhine River to Holland and camped near Rotterdam waiting for ships to England. Of 13,000 Germans who reached London in 1709, only an estimated quarter came on to New York.  The rest found refuge in other places. The huge migration overwhelmed the British government and caused a big political uproar.

Queen Anne encouraged this Protestant migration to her American colonies. Most boarded ships for New York in December 1709, but did not leave England until April 1710. They sailed on eleven crowded boats with unsanitary conditions. Typhus was a problem for these already malnourished refugees. Four hundred seventy people , most children, died before reaching America. With about twenty-one hundred survivors, the Palatine immigration was the largest single immigration to America in the colonial period.  

On reaching New York in June 1710, the ships were quarantined on Nutten Island (now Governor’s Island). Governor Hunter of New York needed the immigrants for the making of naval supplies of pitch, turpentine and tar. Most families first settled along the Hudson River in work camps, to pay off their passage. (This was not a well-thought out process, since Governor Hunter’s pine trees were the incorrect species for producing the needed naval supplies, causing more hardship for the refugees.) Some widows and children, deemed as unfit for the work camps, were left in New York.

Our first Eoff ancestor to come to colonial America was Hans Jacob Eoff (variously spelled Öff, Hoof, Oave and Offin) born October 17, 1679 in Grossheppach, Germany. He was serving an apprenticeship as a weaver, when his illegitimate son Johann Jacob Öff, born to Magdalena Nussbaum, was baptized on April 10, 1702.  Han Jacob and Magdalena married on June 14, 1702. Since an apprentice could not be married, the financial burden of not having a trade and the lure of cheap land could be the reason for the family’s migration. A subsistence list on July 1, 1710 in New York shows the Hans Jacob Off family with five members. By October 4, 1710, the family had decreased to three members. Hans Jacob Eoff died on September 24, 1710 on Governor’s Island, probably from typhus. A child must have also died before October 4, 1710. Magdalena Offin was listed with John Jacob Offin age 8 (or Johann Jacob Off/Eoff our direct ancestor and founder of the Eoff family in America), and Anna Barbara Offin age 6. Magdalena and her children were probably left in New York and did not go the ill-fated Hudson River work camps. She married Joan Peter Kassener (John Peter Castner) in New York 2 April, 1711.

Source for Eoff material – excerpts from “The Eoff Family from the Old World to the New”, from a manuscript by Roberta Grahame in “The McIntires and the Elliotts of Bickle’s Cove, Stone County, Arkansas and the descendents of John McIntire of Maury County, Tennessee” by Pauline Mitchell Pierce, January 1997.

The Eoff ancestors were in my maternal family line, through Edith McIntire Holder.

Copyrighted, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.