Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove – 3rd of 52 ancestors

William (Bill) Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove
William (Bill) Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove

Eva Evelyna Buckmaster was born less than a year after statehood, the first child of Andrew Jackson Buckmaster and Dovey Alpine Piearcy Buckmaster, probably near Wynnewood, Garvin County, Oklahoma.[1] The new state was not yet collecting birth records and only later family records have been found recording her birth on May 14, 1908.[2] Her middle name has been spelled Evelina, Evelyna and even the rather endearing Everleaner, but most records use Evelyna.

By 1910, the Andrew J. Buckmaster family was renting just outside of Sasakwa, in Seminole County, next door to Andrew’s mother, Mahala Hopkins Buckmaster.[3] Living with Mahala was her youngest son, Richard Lafayette, called Babe.[4]Both families were farming on their rented land.[5] The late Charles Wilson Buckmaster, the father of Andrew Jackson and Richard Lafayette, was a Civil War veteran who served with the Union Army, not a fact discussed since most Oklahoma residents supported the Southern effort.[6]

We don’t know much about those early years for Eva, but by 1917, Andrew Jackson Buckmaster family was living in Calvin, Hughes County, where he registered for the World War I draft.[7] The family hasn’t been found in the 1920 census records, but by this time Eva had two brothers and one sister: Goldie born in 1910, Seth Andrew born in 1911 and Vernon Alton born in 1916.[8] Two more little girls were added to the family with Violet Alpine born in 1921 and Sylvia in 1924.[9] There are some gaps in the births of the children, but no record of any other births or pregnancies.

Sometime in 1928, Dovey died, perhaps from scarlet fever or perhaps from double pneumonia, near Holdenville in Hughes County.[10] No records of her death have been found, neither at the state or county level.[11] From family stories, a wooden marker was near her gravesite.[12] Eva and some of her daughters went back to Hughes County many years later but were not able to locate the cemetery.[13]

Andrew Jackson Buckmaster did not remarry after Dovey’s death, but moved his family in with his eighty-five year old mother who owned her land by now.[14] Andrew Jackson farmed the land, with Seth helping and also doing odd jobs.[15] Eva’s younger sister, Goldie married Malone Wilson in July 1929.[16] Then, on November 2, 1929, Eva married William Musgrove in Oklahoma City with Malone Willson and Golda Willson as their witnesses.[17] When they married, Eva was twenty-one years old and Bill was twenty.[18] As far as an education, both had completed the seventh grade.[19]

William Musgrove’s parents were William Walker Musgrove and Mary Elizabeth Pennington Musgrove.[20] While no birth records have been found for William Musgrove, he was probably born in Labette County, Kansas.[21]  In the days before data bases and with limited education, name spellings and variations of names were not so critical. In the first records of William Musgrove, he was listed as William Jr., then later Bill Jr.[22], [23]  In family pictures, he was listed as Bill June or June. However, as an adult he was always called Bill. Most likely, his given name was William Walker Musgrove, Jr (after his father) and he called June (a variation of Junior) until he had children of his own, when his nickname changed to Bill. Some nicknames stuck for life; for example, Richard Lafayette Buckmaster had his nickname of Babe on his gravestone.[24] That nickname is the only name my family ever knew for their Uncle Babe.[25]

After Eva and Bill married, they lived for at least a while with Bill’s family in Council Grove, Oklahoma.[26] For the 1930 census, Bill is listed as W. M. Musgrove, a farmer, renting land as the head of household.[27] In the same family is listed Eva, wife, along with W. W., father, with his trade listed as restaurant, Mary, mother, and younger siblings – Nora M., James H. and Gracie.[28] (See an earlier posting for more information on  Gracie.) The family supported themselves with a booth at a market – selling produce they had raised, along with squabs, young domesticated pigeons, meat they had butchered and ice they had cut from the river.[29] Times were tough in Oklahoma during the depression. In about 1934, the family sold out and bought land in Marshall County, near the Red River in southern Oklahoma.[30] Two homes were built – one for the William Walker Sr. family and one for Bill and Eva’s growing family, with a water well dug near William Walker’s house.[31]

Model T Pickup Truck - Just like the one the family had in the 1930s. Picture taken at Edison Ford Museum in Fort Myers, Florida with William Musgrove, oldest son of the couple.
Model T Pickup Truck – Just like the one the family had in the 1930s. Picture taken at Edison Ford Museum in Fort Myers, Florida with William Musgrove, oldest son of the couple.

The family made the one hundred thirty mile move with a couple of trips in a Model T Ford pickup truck.[32] After the move, the pickup truck was parked and rusted away.[33] Gasoline was just too expensive during those hard times.[34] Their milk cow could not make the trip and was sold to the government for $10.[35] The federal agents shot her in the head and just left her there; no one was allowed to keep the meat.[36] Part of some government program that made no sense to anyone.

By 1935, Eva had borne four children – twins at the first pregnancy, with the baby girl born dead and  buried in a gallon fruit jar in the back yard.[37] So three children, the first born son and two younger daughters girls made the move on the Model T Ford, along with the rest of the family.[38]

Part of an old foundation near the Musgrove homes built in the 1930s - Powell, Marshall County, OK. The area is so overgrown it was hard to pinpoint the location of the houses.
Part of an old foundation near the Musgrove homes built in the 1930s – Powell, Marshall County, OK. The area is so overgrown it was hard to pinpoint the location of the houses.

Eva was probably happy to have her own home. Living with her mother-in-law may not have been that pleasant with Mary Pennington Musgrove feeling that her son had married down.[39] We don’t know why Mary Pennington Musgrove felt that way, perhaps because of Eva’s rumored Indian blood. Eva never said much about her Indian heritage, just saying the family was Black Dutch.[40] Eva’s children remember their daddy being invited up to dinner with their grandparents, but Eva and the children were never invited.[41] We do know both women shared the same religious convictions – both very devoted to the Holiness Church with Eva contributing money to Oral Roberts and Oral Roberts University much of her life.[42]

Christmas Greetings from the Holy Land from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove's collection, probably a memento from a donation to Oral  Roberts University, Musgrove files, in the collection of Andrea Musgrove Perisho, (private address), 2014.
Christmas Greetings from the Holy Land from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove’s collection, probably a memento from a donation to Oral Roberts University, Musgrove files, in the collection of Andrea Musgrove Perisho, (private address), 2014.
Jersey Cow purchased with insurance money.
Jersey Cow purchased with insurance money.

With the construction of Lake Texoma, the family had to sell their land to the Corp of Engineers.[43] After a big search in Texas and Oklahoma, which involved a car wreck and insurance money used to buy a Jersey milk cow, land was found in nearby Bryan County.[44] The rich milk from that Jersey cow may have saved the life of one of Eva and Bill’s young daughter’s during an extended illness.[45]

The two Musgrove families moved to farms several miles apart, but before the move, Bill was injured while working on construction of the Lake Texoma dam.[46] He was on crutches quite a while and had on-going health problems including possible tuberculosis.[47]

Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove on an Easter Sunday hunting eggs with her great-grandchildren.
Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove on an Easter Sunday hunting eggs with her great-grandchildren.

Grandma Musgrove had a total of twelve children with ten still living today.[48] She always had a big garden, canning and later freezing enough food to last her family until the next harvest.[49] She was one who took care of the milk cow and barn as well, even after she came down with sugar diabetes sometime after her last child was born when she was forty-six years old.[50] She was a hard worker, a religious woman and a kind woman. Her children were the focus of her life; she worked hard to take care of them. Eva appreciated a good laugh and was very proud of and much loved by her extended family. Even up into her eighties, Eva still had long dark hair that she worn in a braid and wrapped around her head, still retaining the olive skin and cheekbones of her mother Dovey Alpine Piearcy Buckmaster.

Thirteen months after Bill died, Eva died on August 18, 1992 at the hospital in Denison, Grayson County, Texas.[51] The immediate cause of death was respiratory failure due to pulmonary edema.[52] At the time of her death, Eva left behind thirty-six grandchildren and twenty-eight great-grandchildren.[53] Her oldest grandsons were her pall bearers and there wasn’t a dry eye in the church for this family matriarch.[54] Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove is buried at Albany Cemetery, Albany, Bryan County, Oklahoma.[55]

Tombstone of William Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove
Tombstone of William Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove


[1] Ibid.

[2] Ibid.

[3] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Miller Township, enumeration district (ED) 189, p. 80XX (handwritten and cut off, page before is 8015 and page after is 8089), sheet 9A (handwritten, scratched out, rewritten), dwelling 52, family 52, Andrew J. Buckmaster; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T624,  roll 1274.

[4] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 51, fam. 51, Mahala Buckmaster.  Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 29 Jan 2014), memorial page for Richard Lafayette “Babe” Buckmaster  (1887-1960), Find A Grave Memorial # 93287917, citing Rosedale Cemetery, Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma.

[5] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 52, fam. 52, Andrew J. Buckmaster and 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 51, fam. 51, Mahala Buckmaster.

[6] Compiled service record, Charles Buckmaster, Pvt., Co. A, 14 Iowa Inf.; Carded Records, Volunteer Organizations, Civil War; Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s-1917, Record Group 94; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[7]United States World War 1 Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014), card for Andrew Jackson Buckmaster, serial no. 35-2-8-C  (stamped at top of back of card), Local Draft Board, Holdenville, Hughes County, Oklahoma; citing NARA microfilm publication M1509.

[8] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014),  “Piearcy, Powell, Buckmaster, Thomas, Beaman/Bauermeister and  Cook/Davis Family ” entries for Andrew Jackson Buckmaster (1887-1960); submitted by [private user names].

[9] Ibid.

[10] Ibid. Family stories passed down from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove.

[11] Request to Oklahoma Department of Health for death certificate returned 2 Jan 2013.  Visit to the Holdenville Historical Society, Hughes County, Oklahoma indicated no county death certificates would have been collected at that time.

[12] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013; audiotapes privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2014.

[13] Ibid.

[14] 1930 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, population schedule,  Sasakwa Town, enumeration district (ED) 67-25, p. 8601 (handwritten), sheet 2B (number handwritten, letter stamped), dwelling 40, family 42, Mahaley Buckmaster; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T626,  roll 1931.

[15] 1930 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 8601, dwelling 40, family 42, Mahaley Buckmaster.

[16] Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, Marriage Index, 1889-1951, index, Oklahoma Historical Society (http://www.okhistory.org/research/marriagerec :accessed 29 Jan 2014), entry for Wilson Malone-Golda Buckmaster, 16 July 1929; citing Oklahoma County Marriage records 1889-1951, Book 65, p391.

[17] Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, marriage certificate with no certificate number (2 Nov 1929), Musgrove-Buckmaster; Musgrove Family Papers, privately held by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, [address for private use,] 2012.

[18] Calculation based on their birth dates and date of marriage.

[19] 1940 U.S. census, Marshall County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Lebanon, Holford Township, enumeration district (ED) 48-3,  no page number, sheet 11B (number handwritten and letter stamped), household 192, William  Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T627,  roll 3311.

[20] Texas death certificate no. 076806 (1991), William Junior Musgrove.

[21] 1910 U.S. census, Labette County, Kansas, population schedule, Oswego Township, enumeration district (ED) 143, p. 6322 (handwritten), sheet 8B (number handwritten and letter stamped), dwelling 104, family 105, William Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T624,  roll 443.

[22] 1910 U.S. census, Labette County, Kansas, pop. sch., p. 6322, dwelling 104, family 105, William Musgrove.

[23] 1920 U.S. census, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Pottawatomie Township, enumeration district (ED) 166, no page number, sheet 7B (number handwritten and letter stamped), visited no. 148, William W. Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T625,  roll 1473.

[24] Find A Grave, memorial page for Richard Lafayette “Babe” Buckmaster  (1887-1960), Find A Grave Memorial # 93287917.

[25] William Andrew Musgrove [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 12 July 2013; audiotapes and transcripts privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2014.

[26] 1930 U.S. census, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Council Grove, enumeration district (ED) 55a, p. 5646 (handwritten), sheet 15B (number handwritten and letter stamped), dwelling 331, family 334, W. M. Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T626,  roll 1917.

[27] Ibid.

[28] Ibid.

[29] William Andrew Musgrove [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002; audiotapes and transcripts privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2010.

[30] 1940 U.S. census, Marshall County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., sheet 11B, household 192, William  Musgrove.

[31] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[32] Ibid.

[33] Ibid.

[34] Ibid.

[35] Ibid.

[36] Ibid.

[37] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[38] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[39] Ibid.

[40] Ibid.

[41] Ibid.

[42] Ibid.

[43] Ibid.

[44] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[45] Ibid.

[46] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[47] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[48] Ibid.

[49] Ibid.

[50] Ibid.

[51] Texas death certificate no. 142-92-080426 (1992), Eva Evelyna Musgrove.

[52] Ibid.

[53] “Eva Musgrove,” undated obituary, probably from the Durant Daily Democrat, Durant, Oklahoma; Musgrove Family Papers, privately held by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, [address for private use,] 1992. Laminated and distributed to family members after the funeral.

[54] Ibid.

[55] Texas death certificate no. 142-92-080426 (1992), Eva Evelyna Musgrove.

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

The Search for Dovey Continues – Reverse Genealogy & DNA to Find Living Relatives

With few results from the search for documents on the possible father of Dovey Alpine Piearcy, DNA offers some hope to try to find family for Dovey.

As you may recall, Dovey, my father’s mother’s mother, my great-grandmother, was born four years before her parents married when both James Wesley (Jim) Piearcy and Bertie Wellington were each 14 years old. Family stories say Dovey was born in 1889-90 in Texas, but no records show where either Bertie or Jim were at that time.

I administer kits for nine family members tested at FTDNA, in addition to my own tests at Ancestry.com, FTDNA and 23andMe.

First, I contacting the four people who looked like a Piearcy match from family trees on Ancestry.com. Two of the four responded, saying they weren’t related to the Piearcys. No luck there.

Next, I did reverse genealogy on Rosa Belle Piearcy, the younger daughter of Jim and Bertie Piearcy. Genealogy typically tracks back to prior generations; with reverse genealogy we search forward to find later generations.  If  living daughters/granddaughters of Rosa’s daughters would agree to DNA testing, both autosomal and mt-DNA tests would be performed. If the autosomal test indicated the women were cousins to my father and his sisters and if the mt-DNA test matched my father, then we could presume Bertie was Dovey’s mother. But only if I had other known Piearcy cousins tested to triangulate the match, proving the DNA really was from the Piearcy/Wellington marriage.

I was able to find Rosa’s Texas death certificate, thanks to Karen Stanbary the leader of Mastering Genealogical Proof study group 18.[1] The death certificate listed Rosa’s parents as J. W. Piearey and Bertie Wellington and was signed by Bertha Davis.[2]  Ancestry.com family trees listed Rosa’s children, including Bertha and named Bertha’s husband, Jess W. Davis. A search of newspaper clippings on Genealogybank.com  located Bertha’s husband’s  obit, listing  two daughters.[3] A further search of Genealogybank.com located obits for those two daughters and listed their daughters. No further names will be listed to protect the living people.

A google search of those two women gave me their addresses and one phone number. I prepared letters to the great grand daughters  of Rosa and included a picture of the Jim and Bertie Piearcy family taken about 1906 along with my phone number. I mailed the letters with great anticipation. By a month later, no envelope with a bad address was returned to me, but I had no phone calls either. A call to the available number indicated it had been disconnected.  A google search located several other phone numbers, all disconnected. 411 information calls yielded no phone numbers. The website, Spokeo had a current phone number and email for one of the husbands, but $1.98 later, both the phone number and email were no longer working. None of the involved names had Facebook or Linked-in accounts. So much for my first efforts use reverse genealogy.

From her death certificate, we know Rosa Piearcy Merritt died at the age of 55 as a widow. Ancestry.com trees show she had five children. Reverse genealogy on Bertha has led to a dead end. Another daughter, Laura, died of appendicitis at 10 years of age. A third daughter has no information on Ancestry.com, but another daughter and son had children. Next steps include identifying living descendants of those children, then if that doesn’t work, identifying living descendants of Rosa’s brothers as the search continues for Dovey’s parents.



[1] Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013).

[2] “Texas, Deaths, 1890-1976,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-25176-94928-31?cc=1983324&wc=MMTK-3Z9:n1365956281 : accessed 05 Jan 2014), Death certificates > 1950 > Vol 123, certificates 061001-061500, Feb-Oct, Travis-Matagorda counties, includes delay; citing State Registrar Office, Austin.

[3] “Jess W. Davis obit,” The Corpus Christi Caller-Times [TX], 15 Jan 2007, on-line archives, (http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/obituaries/doc/obit/116B5E6559B25A98-116B5E6559B25A98 : accessed 7 Jan 2014).

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group

Since mid-August, I’ve participated in an on-line study group covering Thomas W. Jones’ book Mastering Genealogical Proof.1,2 This new book has the genealogy community excited, with case studies and questions/answers showing us how to apply respected standards to come up with acceptable conclusions.

Angela Packer McGhie, administrator of the ProGen Study Program, in her Adventures in Genealogy Education blog has just announced five more study groups are forming.3 DearMYRTLE has just completed a study group; the YouTube videos are still available.4  I’ve reviewed those chapter 2 videos to help me understand that chapter’s difficult, for me, concepts.

While working on my family history, I want to learn professional techniques so my research can be used by others. One assignment in MGP is to select a brick wall in your own family tree and use the techniques in the book to break through that brick wall.

For my brick wall, I selected my great-grandmother Dovey Alpine Piearcy Buckmaster, with my research question – “Who were her parents?” The answer to that question seemed pretty clear-cut, until I really started gathering sources for her. Dovey wasn’t listed as a great-granddaughter of Tryphena McGinnis Piearcy in her petition for Choctaw citizenship, as were Dovey’s two younger siblings. (See my earlier post for Tryphena’s petition.) Then I pulled out my paper files on Dovey, including the original marriage records for James Wesley Piearcy and Bertie Wellington. From the calculation of Dovey’s age from the 1900 census, Dovey was born in 1889/90, four years before her parents married in 1894. Both Jim and Bertie were fourteen years old in 1889/90. It really doesn’t seem likely Jim and Bertie would have a child when they were fourteen, then marry four years later. Possible, but not likely.

In chapter 2 of the study group, one of our assignments is to develop a locality guide with all the possible sources of information, to assure a reasonably exhaustive search for records. So far, I’ve written a locality guide for Ozark County, Missouri, where Bertie’s parents married. I’ve found extensive records on Bertie’s mother, Lucinda Webster, but little on Bertie’s father. Family records say his name was John Wellington and his two children , Daniel and Bertie, have their last name recorded as Wellington. So far, I’ve found John’s last name spelled as Wilington and Worlington; maybe that’s why no one has any records of John’s parents.

My next step is to gather information for a locality guide for Arkansas and while I’m at it, see if I can find any records of John and Lucinda Webster Wellington in Arkansas, using a wild card surname search of W*lington. I want to find out where Bertie was nine months before Dovey was born, so I’d love to find records in the 1888-89 time frame. Unfortunately, the 1890 census was destroyed in a fire, so that’s not available.

After that comes a locality guide for Texas, particularly Clay County, where James Wesley Piearcy and Bertie Wellington married in 1894.

It really may take DNA testing to break down this brick wall, so if you are a Piearcy cousin and are interested in DNA testing please contact me. In the meantime, I’ll keep working on this brick wall and through my study of MGP learn more about foot notes, several of which should have included on the above material. But stay posted, I’ll have more blogs on this family lines, with proper footnotes.

Here’s more about the book from the NGS website – Mastering Genealogical Proof aims to help researchers, students, and new family historians reconstruct relationships and lives of people they cannot see. It presents content in digestible chunks. Each chapter concludes with problems providing practice for  proficiently applying the chapter’s concepts. Those problems, like examples throughout the book, use real records, real research, and real issues. Answers are at the back of the book along with a glossary of technical terms and an extensive resource list.5

Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 – Genealogy’s Standard of Proof
  • Chapter 2 – Concepts Fundamental to the GPS
  • Chapter 3 – GPS Element 1: Thorough Research
  • Chapter 4 GPS Element 2: Source Citations
  • Chapter 5 GPS Element 3: Analysis and Correlation
    Chapter 6 GPS Element 4: Resolving Conflicts and Assembling Evidence
  • Chapter 7 GPS Element 5: The Written Conclusion
  • Chapter 8 – Using the GPS
  • Chapter 9 – Conclusion
  • Appendix A – Pritchett Article
  • Appendix B – McLain Article
  • Glossary
  • Reading and Source List
  • Answers to exercises

MGP can be ordered through the NGS website. If you are a member, log in first, to get the discount.

SOURCES

  1. Thomas W. Jones Ph.D, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS is certified by the Board for Certification of Genealogists as a Certified Genealogist and Certified Genealogical Lecturer, and is a Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, Utah Genealogical Society and the National Genealogical Society.  He has co-edited the National Genealogical Society Quarterly since 2002 and is a trustee and a past president of the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  2. Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013).
  3. Angela Packer McGhie, “Five Gen Proof Study Groups Open for Registration,” Adventures in Genealogy Education, posted 07 Sept 2013 (http://genealogyeducation.blogspot.com : accessed 09 Sept 2013).
  4. Pat Richley-Erickson, “MGP Study Group – Hangouts on Air,” DearMYRTLE, posted 17 Mar 2013 (http://blog.dearmyrtle.com : accessed 09 Sept 2013). [NOTE: While DearMYRTLE’s MGP Study Group is finished, the YouTube videos are still available, accessed 09 Sept 2013, to watch the videos just click on the video tab in DearMYRTLE’s YouTube.
  5. National Genealogical Society, “Mastering Genealogical Proof,” NGS Special Publications(http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/ : accessed 09 Sept 2013).
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho