Genealogy Education Plan

With traveling and focusing on training to improve my genealogy research and writing skills, I haven’t posted on the blog for awhile.

In April, I finished the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Genealogy Education Programs (GEP I, II and III). The on-line courses covered DAR applications, plus information useful for other genealogical research. Topics in the twenty-seven lessons included vital records, evaluation of evidence, federal, state, and local records, finding alternative sources, using indirect evidence, creating an analysis, and resolving complex service problems. The last two lessons required submitting an written analysis. I’m now a DAR Genealogy Consultant and feel better prepared to research Revolutionary War patriots for myself and others in our local chapter.

The National Genealogical Society Family History Conference was held in Richmond, Virginia, 7-10 May 2014. I flew in for pre-conference workshops on the probate process and on writing. From Wednesday through Saturday, attendees could choose from dozens of lectures from 8:30 AM to 8:30 PM. When not attending lectures, I was in the Library of Virginia pulling records on Holders and Piggs from Pittsylvania County, perhaps the native home of my Virginia-borne Holder ancestors.

After a week back home, my husband and I flew to Scotland for a tour with a group from our Presbyterian church. Visits to Iona, Stirling Castle of Braveheart fame, Edinburgh, Holy Island-site of the first Viking landing, Rosslyn Chapel-featured in the Da Vinci Code, Cambridge, and several places in and around London were included. During twelve days in Scotland and England, I saw many family surnames-the tomb of Archbishop Musgrave at York Minister, very near where our possible Musgrave ancestors lived; Medcalf in northern England; Knox, Craig, McIntyre and other familiar surnames in Scotland; Archbishop Davidson in southern England and many more. I wish I had ancestors traced back across the pond-maybe a later trip. A wonderful experience, with great scenery and traveling companions.  In the meantime, 500 pictures are awaiting processing.

A week after the overseas trip, I headed to Birmingham, Alabama, for the week-long Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research at Samford University. I was one of twenty five people taking the Writing and Publishing Course taught by Thomas Jones, PhD, one of the most highly regarded genealogy authors and editors in the field and editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ). In addition to pre-work, homework was assigned most nights. On Monday night, after attending an optional evening lecture, I finished my homework at midnight. No more evening lectures for me. During our lunch breaks and long afternoon break, I was in the library researching Alabama ancestors, including Isaac Oaks, a Revolutionary War soldier who fought in Virginia, moved to Georgia, then onto Alabama where he is buried. If I can document this lineage, Isaac Oaks will be my first DAR patriot in our Holder line. A highlight of this trip was meeting a Vickers cousin; we connected through my blog post on Daisy McIntire Vickers.

A genealogy education goal is to participate in a study group based on Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers and Librarians, edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, the previous editor of NGSQ. The twenty nine chapters of ProGen, as it is called, cover Ethical Standards, Problem Analysis and Research Plans, Evidence Analysis and more. ProGen study groups work together on-line over about eighteen months covering the 600+ page book. Successful completion of ProGen is sometimes a precursor of genealogy certification. After Richmond, I applied for an upcoming ProGen class. I hoped for a fall class, but knew some people where waitlisted up to a year. While in Scotland, the ProGen coordinator sent me an email about an open spot for a study group starting June 1st. So in the week between the Scotland/England trip and IGHR, I finished my IGHR pre-work and did the reading for my first ProGen study group session held that same week.

Over the next eighteen months, my time will be balanced between genealogy research and training, focusing on the ProGen study group while still allowing time for an on-line NGSQ study group, which reviews one article from that periodical each month. For more details on NGSQ study groups, see Michele Simmons Lewis’s excellent description on her Ancestoring blog.  I’ve followed Michele’s blog and was especially pleased to meet her in the IGHR writing class.

With any luck, I’ll get back on track with weekly blogs, probably not posting 52 ancestors this year, but posting a few more as my research allows.

 Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Samuel Musgrave – Revolutionary War Soldier and “Indian Spy” #5 in 52 Ancestors

Musgrave
Picture given to Norma Ennis Craig Musgrove by a relative stating the subject was Samuel Musgrave. Does anyone have proof of this?Samue

Samuel Musgrave (Musgrove) was a Revolutionary War soldier who fought under General Washington in the Battle of Brandywine. The battle between the Americans and the British army under General Howe took place on September 11, 1777 near Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. The British won the battle, eventually capturing Philadelphia on September 26 and occupying that city until June 1778.[1]

Based on the research of Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via and others, along with my research, I was accepted into the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) with Jacob Eoff as my ancestor. Follow these links to see earlier posts on the Eoffs and Palatine Germans.

Samuel Musgrove was just approved by the DAR as a supplemental patriot for me. Norma Ennis Craig Musgrove did the research linking her grandfather William Tate Musgrave (Musgrove) to Samuel. Norma was a DAR member herself.

You’ve probably noticed the two different spellings of Samuel’s and William Tate’s last name. William Tate used the spelling Musgrave in his early days, then Musgrove later in life. One family genealogist speculated the spelling was changed to differentiate the child from his first wife from the children by his second wife. Pure speculation, but the timing is about right. Samuel Musgrave’s Quaker parents and grandparents generally used Musgrave as did Samuel’s children. The DAR database is about the only place I’ve seen Samuel’s name spelling Musgrove.

Samuel was the fourth generation of his line in the United States.[2] He was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1747 and died on 2 Sept 1833 in Warrick County, Indiana at 87 years of age.[3] He married Elizabeth Brand in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania on 10 Sept 1767.[4] She was born in Pennsylvania about 1750 and died about 1843 in Warrick County, Indiana.[5]

Samuel enlisted in July 1776 in Cannonkackick Settlement, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and served three months.[6] In 1782, he served twelve more months as an “Indian Spy” under Lt. Robert Ritchie in Pennsylvania Troops.[7] Much of this information is in Samuel’s Proof Pension Claim W.9211.[8] On 30 Dec 1834, Elizabeth filed for a widow’s pension.[9]

Many of the Native Americans had treaties with the British, whom they supported during the war.[10]An Indian Spy patrolled the trails along the frontier warning the settlers of impending attacks.[11] Generally the spys or scouts were divided into pairs, with each pair assigned a section of the frontier were war paths were watched.[12] The spys were not an attack force, but warned the settlers so they could prepare for defense. [13] The men carried their supplies on their backs, slept on the ground and foraged for food living off deer and bear meat.[14] This was a very different life from Samuel’s Quaker relatives who stayed in settled areas, especially considering the pacifist Quaker beliefs. Follow these links to see previous blogs on Samuel Musgrave and Moses Musgrave.

DAR Logo
DAR Logo

If you are a woman over the age of 18 years and descended from either my McIntire/Eoff line or  Musgrave line, you are eligible for DAR membership. If you are interested, contact me for my DAR number and contact your local DAR chapter for more details.[15] Since the research has been done on those lines, you’ll need to collect fewer documents to prove your lineage. For the men, the same information can be used to apply for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution.



[1] Wikipedia, Battle of Brandywine, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Brandywine : accessed 27 Feb 2014.)

[2] Musgrove, Duane and Marie Wilson, A History of the Moses Musgrave Family, Quakers, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Kansas and Further West (Indiana, Evansville Bindery, Inc, 1998), p 11.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Ibid.

[10] Zeigler, Fred, Cook’s Old Mill, ( http://www.cooksoldmill.com/text/article-jcook.html : accessed 27 Feb 2014). Clinch Scouts, (http://vagenweb.org/lee/ClinchScoutsMA.html : accessed 27 Feb 2014).

[11] Ibid.

[12] Ibid.

[13] Ibid

[14] Ibid.

[15] National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, (http://www.dar.org/default.cfm : accessed 27 Feb 2014).

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Constitution Week Celebration – Daughters of the American Revolution

The tradition of celebrating the Constitution was started many years ago by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). The aims of the celebration are to (1) emphasize citizens’ responsibilities for protecting and defending the Constitution, preserving it for posterity;  (2) inform the people that the Constitution is the basis for America’s great heritage and the foundation for our way of life; and (3) encourage the study of the historical events which led to the framing of the Constitution in September 1787. Right click on this link and open link in a new tab to see President General Young’s post on Constitution Week – http://youngblog.dar.org/.

The DAR encourages local chapters to celebrate  Constitution Week with proclamations and other events. Here in Southwest Florida, area chapters hold an annual Constitution Week Luncheon hosted by one of the chapters. This year, my chapter, the Lawrence Kearny Chapter based in Cape Coral, Florida,  was the hostess. We’re a small chapter with about 25 members. About eight of us helped with the event. As a very new member, I volunteered to handle decorations with the theme “Let Freedom Ring.”

Centerpiece DAR LuncheonCenterpieces were based on a wooden stand borrowed from the Barefoot Beach Chapter.1 A free clip art picture of the liberty bell was found on the internet and sent to Walgreen’s photo center where a navy blue border with stars was selected for the 5 X 7 picture. The red poster board mat was added after “Let Freedom Ring” was printed across the top. The back of the centerpiece had selected facts from the National Constitution Center.

Flag CookieFor the favors, rather than a pencil or a copy of the Constitution, we decided to make cookies. Our theme was “Let Freedom Ring,” so we went with flag and liberty bell cookies. A friend and I made a prototype batch of cookies and decided sprinkles on the frosting was not the look we were going for, so we googled flag cookies. Of course, Martha Stewart has a video on how to make flag cookies. Right click on this link and open in a new tab to see Liberty Bell Cookiethe video –http://www.marthastewart.com/247789/flag-cookie.   We followed Martha’s video, other than using our previously purchased smaller cookie cutters. After icing, the cookies were wrapped and sealed with a Lawrence Kearny sticker. So, one hundred and eighty cookies later, we’re a lot better at piping royal icing, but still not ready for a job in the Publix grocery store bakery. 

The centerpieces and the cookies were a big hit, but even more impressive were the Southwest Florida Handbell Ensemble directed by Michael Helman and the speech by Rev. Dr. H. Timothy Halverson, Senior Pastor, Faith Presbyterian Church. Altogether, our small city of Cape Coral did a fine job of hostessing the Greater Southwest Florida chapters at our Constitution Week celebration.

Now, enough of this and back to genealogy research – more homework with the Mastering Genealogical Proof study group and a brick wall in finding my great-grandmother Dovey Alpine Piearcy’s parents.2 Then working up the information from my summer research trips.

SOURCES

  1. The wooden stand was hand-made and donated to the Barefoot Beach Chapter. The base is 10″ in diameter. The stand is about 9″ tall and 7″ wide. The wooden pen holder is about 2″ square and drilled through in order to hold a pen, feather or flower arrangement, in this case. The back should be decorated as well, if you use it for a round table centerpiece.
  2. National Genealogical Society, “Mastering Genealogical Proof,” NGS Special Publications(http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/ : accessed 09 Sept 2013).
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Eoff – Jacob, Peter and Isaac: Three Generations of Patriots

Revolutionary War Flag

In an earlier post, we discussed the Palatine German migration and our first ancestor, Han Jacob Eoff who died in 1710 while still in quarantine on Governor’s Island, New York. His widow, Magdalena was listed with two children, John Jacob Offin age 8, and Anna Barbara Offin age 6. Magdalena  and the children somehow avoided the work camps. She married Joan Peter Kassener (John Peter Castner) in New York  April 2, 1711. (The Eoffs were ancestors of Edith McIntire Holder.)

In 1734, Johan Jacob Öff purchased 432 acres in Somerset County, New Jersey. There Jacob Öff/Eoff built a large tavern/inn which was well known for its soft beds and warm hospitality. It remained in the family for several generations. Jacob also donated the land and money to build Zion Lutheran Church, the cornerstone of which still stands today. The small town that built up around the Eoff tavern was called Pluckemin, supposedly so named because of Jacob’s talent at ‘Plucking them in’…

The most famous patron of the inn was George Washington, who leading a bedraggled but victorious army stopped at the Inn on January 5, 1777 to write to Congress and tell them of his victory at Princeton, New Jersey.

One of the first Masonic Lodges, Solomon’s Lodge No 1 F&A&M, Somverville, New Jersey, was organized in the barn of Christian Eoff, one of Jacob’s sons.   

Jacob Eoff died in Pluckemin, Somerset County, New Jersey on September 9, 1780. His wife was Marie Magdalen Spohnheimer.

Revolutionary War Records for New Jersey show that Jacob Öff took the loyalty oath and served as a private soldier. DAR records show he provided supplies to the Revolutionary Army. His DAR patriot number is A037036. He is listed in the Somerset County, New Jersey censuses of 1775 and 1779.

Johann Jacob Öff’s will is on file in the courthouse at Trenton, New Jersey. His estate was estimated at 13,000 pounds and included nine bound books and six unbound books! Who could imagine a small boy coming to America, with his father dead on Governor’s Island, leaving an estate valued over $1,120,000 in 2012 US dollars, as well as having a library of books!

Peter Eoff: DAR Patriot Number – A204951

Peter was born in Bridgewater, Somerset County, New Jersey in about 1734. He married Elizabeth, last name unknown, in 1760 in Somerset County, New Jersey. They had nine children. He managed the Inn for a while after his brother, Christian.

 We don’t know why the family left the relative comfort of New Jersey, but by 1780, they were on the frontier in Camden District, South Carolina. When Peter was drafted, his son Isaac served as his substitute. This was a common practice, with more experienced men staying home to work the fields and manage the livestock. Peter did serve in the militia in 1780 under Captain Jones. Peter died on December 5, 1788, in Madison County, Kentucky at the age of 54. Elizabeth lived in the same area until she died in 1805 at the age of 71.

Isaac Eoff gravestone

Isaac Eoff: DAR Patriot Number – A033811

Isaac was born on January 12, 1761 in Somerset County, New Jersey. He first served in the Revolutionary War, when he was sixteen years of age, in the place of his father who was drafted in Chester County, South Carolina. He served for four months at Charleston under Captain John Mills in Sumpter’s regiment. He then enlisted for ten months in a company commanded by Captain Mills who joined Sumpter. He served four months under Alexander Fagin , was in battle when Sumpter was defeated was in the battles of Fish Dam Ford, Blackstock and Eutaw Springs where he was taken prisoner. He served a total of 201 days. In almost all his tours of duty, he served with one of James Knox’ sons or sons-in-law. We’re not sure when or where he met Margaret Knox, but we’re glad they met. They married on March 12, 1783. They went on to have eight children, all born in South Carolina. In 1810, the family moved to Pulaski County, Kentucky. By 1840, they were in Cannon County, Tennessee.

Isaac died on October 2, 1841. His white marble headstone is located in the Civil War Cemetery in Coffee County, Tennessee just off I-24 at Beech Grove exit at Highway 64. Exit off toward Beech Grove, the cemetery is on the left on a small knoll. The Civil War Cemetery is older than the Civil War. The name was changed after the War because of the many Civil War solders buried there, most with no names on their headstones. This is a federal cemetery and well kept, very pretty and peaceful.

After his death, Margaret moved with most of her children to Carroll County, Arkansas, where she died in 1848, far away from Ireland where she was born.

 This family represents one of the few families I’ve seen, who have three generations of patriots in support of the Revolutionary War.

DAR Logo

My DAR application through Isaac Eoff is pending. If my application is approved, if you are a woman in this family line within three generations of me, you can apply to DAR using a short form. Let me know if you have question. amp

 

Sources

  • “A Study of the German Immigrants Who Arrived in Colonial New York in 1710″ Published 1985. This set includes two pages of data on the Off family–see p. 713 of Volume II
  • “The Palatine Families of New York” by Henry Z. Jones, Jr.
  • Peter Eoff – provided a substitute, his son, Isaac. Captain Jones, militia; “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in American Revolution,” AA. 2232A L325. SC Arch Acct. Aud #1004, Roll #4842, SR3362V-pension of Isaac Eoff.
  • Isaac Eoff -National Archives file #3362; served in the army from Chester Co SC #326, Book L. “Roster of South Carolina Patriots in American Revolution,” AA. 2232A L325.

Copyright, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.