Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove – 3rd of 52 ancestors

William (Bill) Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove
William (Bill) Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove

Eva Evelyna Buckmaster was born less than a year after statehood, the first child of Andrew Jackson Buckmaster and Dovey Alpine Piearcy Buckmaster, probably near Wynnewood, Garvin County, Oklahoma.[1] The new state was not yet collecting birth records and only later family records have been found recording her birth on May 14, 1908.[2] Her middle name has been spelled Evelina, Evelyna and even the rather endearing Everleaner, but most records use Evelyna.

By 1910, the Andrew J. Buckmaster family was renting just outside of Sasakwa, in Seminole County, next door to Andrew’s mother, Mahala Hopkins Buckmaster.[3] Living with Mahala was her youngest son, Richard Lafayette, called Babe.[4]Both families were farming on their rented land.[5] The late Charles Wilson Buckmaster, the father of Andrew Jackson and Richard Lafayette, was a Civil War veteran who served with the Union Army, not a fact discussed since most Oklahoma residents supported the Southern effort.[6]

We don’t know much about those early years for Eva, but by 1917, Andrew Jackson Buckmaster family was living in Calvin, Hughes County, where he registered for the World War I draft.[7] The family hasn’t been found in the 1920 census records, but by this time Eva had two brothers and one sister: Goldie born in 1910, Seth Andrew born in 1911 and Vernon Alton born in 1916.[8] Two more little girls were added to the family with Violet Alpine born in 1921 and Sylvia in 1924.[9] There are some gaps in the births of the children, but no record of any other births or pregnancies.

Sometime in 1928, Dovey died, perhaps from scarlet fever or perhaps from double pneumonia, near Holdenville in Hughes County.[10] No records of her death have been found, neither at the state or county level.[11] From family stories, a wooden marker was near her gravesite.[12] Eva and some of her daughters went back to Hughes County many years later but were not able to locate the cemetery.[13]

Andrew Jackson Buckmaster did not remarry after Dovey’s death, but moved his family in with his eighty-five year old mother who owned her land by now.[14] Andrew Jackson farmed the land, with Seth helping and also doing odd jobs.[15] Eva’s younger sister, Goldie married Malone Wilson in July 1929.[16] Then, on November 2, 1929, Eva married William Musgrove in Oklahoma City with Malone Willson and Golda Willson as their witnesses.[17] When they married, Eva was twenty-one years old and Bill was twenty.[18] As far as an education, both had completed the seventh grade.[19]

William Musgrove’s parents were William Walker Musgrove and Mary Elizabeth Pennington Musgrove.[20] While no birth records have been found for William Musgrove, he was probably born in Labette County, Kansas.[21]  In the days before data bases and with limited education, name spellings and variations of names were not so critical. In the first records of William Musgrove, he was listed as William Jr., then later Bill Jr.[22], [23]  In family pictures, he was listed as Bill June or June. However, as an adult he was always called Bill. Most likely, his given name was William Walker Musgrove, Jr (after his father) and he called June (a variation of Junior) until he had children of his own, when his nickname changed to Bill. Some nicknames stuck for life; for example, Richard Lafayette Buckmaster had his nickname of Babe on his gravestone.[24] That nickname is the only name my family ever knew for their Uncle Babe.[25]

After Eva and Bill married, they lived for at least a while with Bill’s family in Council Grove, Oklahoma.[26] For the 1930 census, Bill is listed as W. M. Musgrove, a farmer, renting land as the head of household.[27] In the same family is listed Eva, wife, along with W. W., father, with his trade listed as restaurant, Mary, mother, and younger siblings – Nora M., James H. and Gracie.[28] (See an earlier posting for more information on  Gracie.) The family supported themselves with a booth at a market – selling produce they had raised, along with squabs, young domesticated pigeons, meat they had butchered and ice they had cut from the river.[29] Times were tough in Oklahoma during the depression. In about 1934, the family sold out and bought land in Marshall County, near the Red River in southern Oklahoma.[30] Two homes were built – one for the William Walker Sr. family and one for Bill and Eva’s growing family, with a water well dug near William Walker’s house.[31]

Model T Pickup Truck - Just like the one the family had in the 1930s. Picture taken at Edison Ford Museum in Fort Myers, Florida with William Musgrove, oldest son of the couple.
Model T Pickup Truck – Just like the one the family had in the 1930s. Picture taken at Edison Ford Museum in Fort Myers, Florida with William Musgrove, oldest son of the couple.

The family made the one hundred thirty mile move with a couple of trips in a Model T Ford pickup truck.[32] After the move, the pickup truck was parked and rusted away.[33] Gasoline was just too expensive during those hard times.[34] Their milk cow could not make the trip and was sold to the government for $10.[35] The federal agents shot her in the head and just left her there; no one was allowed to keep the meat.[36] Part of some government program that made no sense to anyone.

By 1935, Eva had borne four children – twins at the first pregnancy, with the baby girl born dead and  buried in a gallon fruit jar in the back yard.[37] So three children, the first born son and two younger daughters girls made the move on the Model T Ford, along with the rest of the family.[38]

Part of an old foundation near the Musgrove homes built in the 1930s - Powell, Marshall County, OK. The area is so overgrown it was hard to pinpoint the location of the houses.
Part of an old foundation near the Musgrove homes built in the 1930s – Powell, Marshall County, OK. The area is so overgrown it was hard to pinpoint the location of the houses.

Eva was probably happy to have her own home. Living with her mother-in-law may not have been that pleasant with Mary Pennington Musgrove feeling that her son had married down.[39] We don’t know why Mary Pennington Musgrove felt that way, perhaps because of Eva’s rumored Indian blood. Eva never said much about her Indian heritage, just saying the family was Black Dutch.[40] Eva’s children remember their daddy being invited up to dinner with their grandparents, but Eva and the children were never invited.[41] We do know both women shared the same religious convictions – both very devoted to the Holiness Church with Eva contributing money to Oral Roberts and Oral Roberts University much of her life.[42]

Christmas Greetings from the Holy Land from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove's collection, probably a memento from a donation to Oral  Roberts University, Musgrove files, in the collection of Andrea Musgrove Perisho, (private address), 2014.
Christmas Greetings from the Holy Land from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove’s collection, probably a memento from a donation to Oral Roberts University, Musgrove files, in the collection of Andrea Musgrove Perisho, (private address), 2014.
Jersey Cow purchased with insurance money.
Jersey Cow purchased with insurance money.

With the construction of Lake Texoma, the family had to sell their land to the Corp of Engineers.[43] After a big search in Texas and Oklahoma, which involved a car wreck and insurance money used to buy a Jersey milk cow, land was found in nearby Bryan County.[44] The rich milk from that Jersey cow may have saved the life of one of Eva and Bill’s young daughter’s during an extended illness.[45]

The two Musgrove families moved to farms several miles apart, but before the move, Bill was injured while working on construction of the Lake Texoma dam.[46] He was on crutches quite a while and had on-going health problems including possible tuberculosis.[47]

Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove on an Easter Sunday hunting eggs with her great-grandchildren.
Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove on an Easter Sunday hunting eggs with her great-grandchildren.

Grandma Musgrove had a total of twelve children with ten still living today.[48] She always had a big garden, canning and later freezing enough food to last her family until the next harvest.[49] She was one who took care of the milk cow and barn as well, even after she came down with sugar diabetes sometime after her last child was born when she was forty-six years old.[50] She was a hard worker, a religious woman and a kind woman. Her children were the focus of her life; she worked hard to take care of them. Eva appreciated a good laugh and was very proud of and much loved by her extended family. Even up into her eighties, Eva still had long dark hair that she worn in a braid and wrapped around her head, still retaining the olive skin and cheekbones of her mother Dovey Alpine Piearcy Buckmaster.

Thirteen months after Bill died, Eva died on August 18, 1992 at the hospital in Denison, Grayson County, Texas.[51] The immediate cause of death was respiratory failure due to pulmonary edema.[52] At the time of her death, Eva left behind thirty-six grandchildren and twenty-eight great-grandchildren.[53] Her oldest grandsons were her pall bearers and there wasn’t a dry eye in the church for this family matriarch.[54] Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove is buried at Albany Cemetery, Albany, Bryan County, Oklahoma.[55]

Tombstone of William Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove
Tombstone of William Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove


[1] Ibid.

[2] Ibid.

[3] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Miller Township, enumeration district (ED) 189, p. 80XX (handwritten and cut off, page before is 8015 and page after is 8089), sheet 9A (handwritten, scratched out, rewritten), dwelling 52, family 52, Andrew J. Buckmaster; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T624,  roll 1274.

[4] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 51, fam. 51, Mahala Buckmaster.  Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 29 Jan 2014), memorial page for Richard Lafayette “Babe” Buckmaster  (1887-1960), Find A Grave Memorial # 93287917, citing Rosedale Cemetery, Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma.

[5] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 52, fam. 52, Andrew J. Buckmaster and 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 51, fam. 51, Mahala Buckmaster.

[6] Compiled service record, Charles Buckmaster, Pvt., Co. A, 14 Iowa Inf.; Carded Records, Volunteer Organizations, Civil War; Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s-1917, Record Group 94; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[7]United States World War 1 Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014), card for Andrew Jackson Buckmaster, serial no. 35-2-8-C  (stamped at top of back of card), Local Draft Board, Holdenville, Hughes County, Oklahoma; citing NARA microfilm publication M1509.

[8] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014),  “Piearcy, Powell, Buckmaster, Thomas, Beaman/Bauermeister and  Cook/Davis Family ” entries for Andrew Jackson Buckmaster (1887-1960); submitted by [private user names].

[9] Ibid.

[10] Ibid. Family stories passed down from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove.

[11] Request to Oklahoma Department of Health for death certificate returned 2 Jan 2013.  Visit to the Holdenville Historical Society, Hughes County, Oklahoma indicated no county death certificates would have been collected at that time.

[12] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013; audiotapes privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2014.

[13] Ibid.

[14] 1930 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, population schedule,  Sasakwa Town, enumeration district (ED) 67-25, p. 8601 (handwritten), sheet 2B (number handwritten, letter stamped), dwelling 40, family 42, Mahaley Buckmaster; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T626,  roll 1931.

[15] 1930 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 8601, dwelling 40, family 42, Mahaley Buckmaster.

[16] Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, Marriage Index, 1889-1951, index, Oklahoma Historical Society (http://www.okhistory.org/research/marriagerec :accessed 29 Jan 2014), entry for Wilson Malone-Golda Buckmaster, 16 July 1929; citing Oklahoma County Marriage records 1889-1951, Book 65, p391.

[17] Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, marriage certificate with no certificate number (2 Nov 1929), Musgrove-Buckmaster; Musgrove Family Papers, privately held by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, [address for private use,] 2012.

[18] Calculation based on their birth dates and date of marriage.

[19] 1940 U.S. census, Marshall County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Lebanon, Holford Township, enumeration district (ED) 48-3,  no page number, sheet 11B (number handwritten and letter stamped), household 192, William  Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T627,  roll 3311.

[20] Texas death certificate no. 076806 (1991), William Junior Musgrove.

[21] 1910 U.S. census, Labette County, Kansas, population schedule, Oswego Township, enumeration district (ED) 143, p. 6322 (handwritten), sheet 8B (number handwritten and letter stamped), dwelling 104, family 105, William Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T624,  roll 443.

[22] 1910 U.S. census, Labette County, Kansas, pop. sch., p. 6322, dwelling 104, family 105, William Musgrove.

[23] 1920 U.S. census, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Pottawatomie Township, enumeration district (ED) 166, no page number, sheet 7B (number handwritten and letter stamped), visited no. 148, William W. Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T625,  roll 1473.

[24] Find A Grave, memorial page for Richard Lafayette “Babe” Buckmaster  (1887-1960), Find A Grave Memorial # 93287917.

[25] William Andrew Musgrove [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 12 July 2013; audiotapes and transcripts privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2014.

[26] 1930 U.S. census, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Council Grove, enumeration district (ED) 55a, p. 5646 (handwritten), sheet 15B (number handwritten and letter stamped), dwelling 331, family 334, W. M. Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T626,  roll 1917.

[27] Ibid.

[28] Ibid.

[29] William Andrew Musgrove [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002; audiotapes and transcripts privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2010.

[30] 1940 U.S. census, Marshall County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., sheet 11B, household 192, William  Musgrove.

[31] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[32] Ibid.

[33] Ibid.

[34] Ibid.

[35] Ibid.

[36] Ibid.

[37] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[38] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[39] Ibid.

[40] Ibid.

[41] Ibid.

[42] Ibid.

[43] Ibid.

[44] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[45] Ibid.

[46] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[47] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[48] Ibid.

[49] Ibid.

[50] Ibid.

[51] Texas death certificate no. 142-92-080426 (1992), Eva Evelyna Musgrove.

[52] Ibid.

[53] “Eva Musgrove,” undated obituary, probably from the Durant Daily Democrat, Durant, Oklahoma; Musgrove Family Papers, privately held by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, [address for private use,] 1992. Laminated and distributed to family members after the funeral.

[54] Ibid.

[55] Texas death certificate no. 142-92-080426 (1992), Eva Evelyna Musgrove.

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Search for Dovey Alpine Piearcy’s Parents Continues

As you may recall from an earlier blog, Dovey Alpine Piearcy was my great-grandmother. I have good sources for my grandparents and four family lines back to Revolutionary War ancestors, but I’ve moved back to collecting sources for all my great grandparents. Dovey is a problem, since she was born four years before her parents married, when James Wesley Piearcy and Bertie Wellington would have each been 14 years old. Dovey is the brick wall research project that I chose for my Mastering Genealogical Proof case study – again see that earlier blog.

Here’s a picture of the James Welsey Piearcy family, probably taken about 1907 based on the age and size of the younger children. Dovey is in the white dress with the dark hair. I’ve obtained the marriage record for Dovey and Andrew Jackson Buckmaster married in the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Nation in 1907, six months before statehood. I wonder if Dovey is wearing her wedding dress for this picture, since her outfit is different than the other family members. Though women generally didn’t wear white for their weddings in those day.

Piearcy James Wesley family about 1915
 James Wesley Piearcy family about 1907

 

There is no indication of race on the marriage records for Andrew Jackson Buckmaster and Dovey Piearcy. The Chickasaw Nation was the legal authority in the area at that time, recording marriages of Indians and Whites.

The leader of our MGP study group found Dovey’s sister (or half-sister maybe) Rosa/Rosie’s death certificate in Texas. She also noticed one of the Choctaw citizenship applications (that I had) listed Bertie as Bertie Daisy Deen Piearcy, so that’s a lead that maybe Bertie was perhaps married to a Deen. (By the way, all the Piearcy Choctaw citizenship applications were denied.) So maybe Dovey was a Deen. I’ve also been contacting lots of paternal DNA cousins trying to find a DNA connection to Bertie Wellington/Willington/Worthington (all the different spellings for last name of Bertie’s father – John Wellington), Dovey Alpine Piearcy or James Welsey Piearcy.  No luck there yet, but if you are a cousin in this line who has had DNA testing performed or are interested in having it performed, please contact me. Or if you are a Deen and anything about this family sounds familiar to you, please contact me. . .

 Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Charles Wilson Buckmaster – Iowa Infantry, Union Army, private.

Charles Wilson Buckmaster was born on September 12 1843 in Coshocton, Coshocton County, Ohio. Wilson was a family name passed down from his great, great, great grandmother Mary Wilson Buckmaster, who was born in Kent County, Delaware in 1680. 

He enlisted as a private in Company E and A, 14th Regiment of the Iowa Infantry on August 30, 1862, serving in the 42nd and the 43rd Infantry.  From the regimental records, it looks like he saw a lot of action and may have been a POW. I’ve requested his military and pension records.

Service Details: The 14th Regiment, Iowa Infantry was organized at Davenport in November and mustered in November 6, 1861. Ordered to St. Louis, Mo., December, 1861. Attached  to District of Corinth, Dept. of Tennessee, to December, 1862. Davenport, Iowa, and St. Louis, Mo., to April, 1863. Cairo, Ill., District of Columbus, 6th Division, 16th Army Corps, Dept. of Tennessee, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 16th Army Corps, to December, 1864. Springfield, Ill., to August, 1865.

From Regiment records, Charles may have fought in the following battles: Fort Donelson February 12-16, 1862, where Walker Everett Todd, another ancestor fighting for the south, was captured; Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 6-7; held center at “Hornet’s Nest” and Regiment mostly captured, paroled October 12, 1862, exchanged November 19, 1862;  Those not captured assigned to Union Brigade and participated in the advance on and seize of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Pursuit to Booneville May 31-June 13. Duty at Corinth till August, and at Danville, Miss., till October. Battle of Corinth October 3-4. Pursuit to Ripley October 5-12. At Corinth until December 18. Ordered to rejoin Regiment at Davenport, Iowa, December 18. While en route participated in the defense of Jackson, Tenn., December 20, 1862, to January 4, 1863. Arrived at Davenport January 7. Reorganizing Regiment at Davenport, Iowa, and at St. Louis, Mo., till April. Moved to Cairo, Ill., April 10, and duty there till January, 1864. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss. Meridian Campaign February 3 to March 5. Meridian February 14-15. Marion February 15-17. Canton February 28. Red River Campaign March 10-May 22. Fort DeRussy March 14. Occupation of Alexandria March 16. Henderson’s Hill March 21. Battle of Pleasant Hill April 9. Cloutiersville and Cane River Crossing April 22-24. At Alexandria April 27-May 13. Moore’s Plantation May 5-7. Bayou Boeuf May 7. Bayou LaMourie May 12. Retreat to Morganza May 13-20. Mansura May 16. Yellow Bayou May 18-19. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., thence to Memphis, Tenn., May 20-June 10. Lake Chicot, Ark., June 6-7. Smith’s Expedition to Tupelo July 5-21. Pontotoc July 11. Camargo’s Cross Roads, near Harrisburg, July 13. Tupelo July 14-15. Old Town Creek July 15. Smith’s Expedition to Oxford, Miss., August 1-30. Tallahatchie River August 7-9. Abbeville and Oxford August 12. Abbeville August 23. Mower’s Expedition up White River to Duvall’s Bluff September 1-7. March through Arkansas and Missouri in pursuit of Price September 17-October 25. (4 Cos. sent to Pilot Knob, Mo., and participated in actions at Ironton, Shut in Gap and Arcadia September 26. Fort Davidson, Pilot Knob, September 26-27. Leesburg or Harrison September 28-29.) Regiment assembled at St. Louis, Mo., November 2 and mustered out November 16, 1864. Veterans and recruits consolidated to two Companies and assigned to duty at Springfield, Ill., till August 8, 1865, when Charles was mustered out.

 His regiment lost five officers and fifty-nine enlisted men killed and mortally wounded during service and one officer and one hundred thirty eight enlisted men by disease. Total 203.

 Charles mustered out as a private of Company E on June 6, 1865 at Davenport, Iowa. Shortly after mustering out, on September 10, 1865, Charles Wilson married Mahala Hopkins.

 By 1880, the family had moved to Stafford, Kansas. It appears the family moved to Indian Territory sometime before April 7, 1885, when Andrew Jackson Buckmaster, Eva’s father, was born in Indian Territory, Oklahoma. 

 Charles died on March 18, 1919, (age 75 years) in Holdenville, Hughes County, Oklahoma, United States. He had been in Holdenville and was planning to go home to Hilltop on a local freight train. He climbed aboard the caboose which was detached from the train and fell off. He was dead when found. The doctor ruled the cause of death as a heart attack. Charles Wilson was Eva Buckmaster Musgrove’s grandfather.

 Sources

  • U.S. Civil War Soldier Records and Profiles, on-line Provo, Utah.
  • Index to Compiled Military Service Records, film M541, roll 4.
  • Roster and Record of Iowa Soldiers in the War of Rebellion.
  • Civil War Pension Index: General Index to Pension Files, 1861-1934.

Copyrighted, 2012 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.