DAISY MCINTIRE VICKERS 1888-1965 #2 of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Daisy McIntire, the pretty blond youngest daughter of John A. McIntire and Mary Jane Elliott, was born in the summer of 1888 in Bickles Cove, Stone County, Arkansas.[1],[2] Daisy was eleventh of thirteen children with two younger brothers.[3] Hendrix, my great-grandfather, was four years older than Daisy.[4]

John, a stone mason with his fine handwork still apparent in the partly standing log cabin on their old home place, died of a ruptured appendix when Daisy was just six years old.[5],[6] Some family members call him John Alfonso though the existing records only show his middle initial as an A.[7]  Mary Jane stayed in Stone County raising the children until she moved to Oklahoma sometime before 1920.[8]

After reading my blog about a visit to Stone County, Arkansas, a Vickers cousin shared several photographs, which inspired this article.[9] The photographs in this blog can also be found in Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via’s book on pages 249 and 251.[10] Pauline still has some of her books available. If you are interested in purchasing her hardback book with almost 600 pages, you can contact Pauline at the addresses below.[11]

Pauline’s book and the census records tell us a lot about Daisy, but if you have any family stories or more records to add to her story or corrections to this story, let me know. I copyright my blog postings, but family members may use this information and pictures for their own personal use.

Stone County was created April 21, 1873, from parts of Izard, Independence, Searcy and Van Buren counties and was named for the rock formations of the Ozark Mountains.[12] The county seat is Mountain View.[13] Virtually unoccupied by white settlers in the first decades of the nineteenth century, present-day Stone County was an Indian reservation until 1828.[14] Stone County’s initial white settlements began soon after that in the early 1830s.[15] The county was devastated during the Civil War, not from battles, but from lawless bushwhackers and guerillas who terrorized the border lands of Arkansas and Missouri with their plundering, theft, destruction of property and even murder.[16]After the Civil War, development, especially along the White River, increased.[17] Agriculture was important in the area, though you can imagine with the name of Stone County, farming was not a lucrative occupation, but with each family producing enough for their own needs.[18]  The economic base of today’s Stone County is poultry, livestock, wood products, and light manufacturing along with popular tourist destinations such as the Ozark National Forest, Blanchard Spring Caverns and the Ozark Folk Center.[19]

1900 U.S. Census, Blue Mountain Township, Stone County, Arkansas, family 126.[20]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

Status

McIntire, Mary J

Head

F

W

47

Wd

McIntire,       Julia

Dau

F

W

20

S

McIntire,       Madona

Dau

F

W

17

S

McIntire,       Cleveland

Son

M

W

15

S

McIntire,       Hendrix

Son

M

W

19

S

McIntire,        Daisy

Dau

F

W

11

S

McIntire,        Clinton

Son

M

W

10

S

McIntire,        Josh

Son

M

W

5

S

Additional information on the census indicates Mary J. McIntire was renting land, with her occupation listed as farmer.[21] The census stated Mary J. had been married twenty two years, was the mother of thirteen children with twelve of the children still living.[22]

The occupation of the twins, Cleveland and Hendrix, was farm laborer.[23] Mary J., Julia and Madona could read and write, but the census taker indicated none of the other children could. [24]  All spoke English.[25] It appears none of the children had attended school in the past year.[26] From nearby census pages, about one third to one half of the school age children had attended two or three months of school.[27]

The census records also indicate all the children were born in Arkansas, as was Mary J. McIntire.[28] Her parents and the father of the children were born in Tennessee.[29]

The twins, Cleveland (nickname – Cleve) and Hendrix (nickname – Hen), were listed in the index with Cleve as age 15 and Hen as age 19.[30] On the digital image of the census, the age of both boys was listed as 15, with that crossed out and re-entered as 14.[31] Then, on the index, Cleve was transcribed as 15 and Hen as 19.[32] The twins were born on 29 Sept 1884. [33] So Cleve and Hen were 15 and would turn 16 in Sept. Also, the Madona listed in the index is actually Mandana, always called Dane. The transcription errors in this index is the reason genealogists always search for the original record and do not trust a transcription/index.

At the time of the 1900 census, Clifton R. McIntire, just older than Daisy, was not counted with the family but was listed as a boarder with another Blue Mountain Township resident James Simpson, age 74, and his wife Rachel Simpson.[34] Clifton was 13. 

Daisy McIntire

Daisy McIntire

When she was fifteen, Daisy married William Alfonso Vickers, a widower seventeen years older.[35] A copy of their marriage record is in the Pierce Via book, along with Pauline’s comments about the marriage license stating Daisy was 17, when she was really only 15.[36]In later years, Daisy said she married at age 15, which perfectly matches the calculation using her birth date and marriage date.[37] William had one daughter Nettie, eight years old.[38], [39] William’s first wife was Lucy Belle McIntire, a granddaughter of John McIntire and Lydia McCollum, who were great grandparents to Daisy, so the two wives of William Alfonso Vickers were first cousins, once removed.[40] In this culture, it seems a widower with children naturally looked to his wife’s family for a second wife, perhaps to make sure the children are well treated. Daisy went on to raise Nettie and have nine handsome sons of her own, eight who lived to adulthood.[41]

U.S. censuses are collected every 10 years and can tell us a lot of information. While many of the same basic facts are gathered at each census, some different facts are also collected. Here’s what we can tell about the Vickers family from 1910-1940 census records.

1910 U.S. Census, Cove, Stone County, Arkansas, family 9.[42]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

Status

Married yrs

Born In

Father born in

Mother born in

Vickers, William

Head

M

W

38

M2

6

TN

TN

TN

Vickers, Daisy

Wife

F

W

21

M1

6

AR

AR

AR

Vickers, Nettie

Dau

F

W

14

S

AR

TN

AR

 Vickers, Elihue

Son

M

W

2

S

AR

TN

AR

Vickers, No Name

Son

M

W

10/12

S

AR

TN

AR

Gracie, M J

Mother

F

W

58

Wd

TN

TN

TN

In the 1910 census, the Vickers family was renting land just three dwellings from Mary J. McIntire, who now owns her land.[43] Evidently, the township name was changed from Blue Mountain to Cove with Mary Jane McIntire still in the same place since the 1900 census. From the 1910 census, Daisy had two children who are both still living. M. J. Gracie, mother of William Vickers and enumerated with the William Vickers family, indicates she had six children with only one still living.[44] Other Ancestry.com records show William’s mother was Mary Jane Berryhill Vickers Gracy(ie), born about 1854 in Tennessee and died in 1910 sometime after the census was taken that year.[45] Most of these Ancestry.com records show William Vickers’ father was Robert Lafayette Vickers born about 1852, with no death information. [46]

1920 U.S. Census, Cove, Stone County, Arkansas, dwelling #6.[47]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

Attended school

Can read

Can Write

Vickers, W. A.

Head

M

W

49

Y

Y

Vickers, Daisy

Wife

F

W

32

Y

Y

Vickers, Elihue

Son

M

W

12

Y

Y

Y

Vickers, Borden

Son

M

W

10

Y

Y

Y

Vickers, Richard

Son

M

W

8

Y

Vickers, Wymond

Son

M

W

4 7/8

Vickers, Jennings

Son

M

W

1 1/12

By 1920, the Vickers family is still renting in the Cove area, with the Cleveland McIntire family listed three families down on the same census page.[48] Daisy and Cleve’s mother, Mary Jane McIntire has moved to Cleveland, Oklahoma to live with son, Jasper.[49] Nettie Vickers had left the family home and married Silas Albright.[50] Find-A-Grave.com records show Nettie was born in 1895 and died in 1973.[51] Also, Ancestry.com family trees show Odis Vickers was born in 1913, two years after Richard.[52] Find-a-Grave shows a tombstone picture for Odis, indicating he was born on March 1, 1913 and died in Nov 1914, so Odis wouldn’t appear in any census records.[53] I don’t find any notes on the cause of death. From the 1920, 1930 and 1940 censuses, the state the family members was born in, along with the state their parents was born in, is consistent with the 1910 census.  

1930 U.S. Census, Wallace, Stone County, Arkansas, dwelling #60.[54]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

Attended school

Can read/ write

Occupation

Vickers, W. A.

Head

M

W

58

N

Y

General farming

Vickers, Daisy

Wife

F

W

44

N

Y

Vickers, Richard

Son

M

W

19

N

Y

Work on father’s farm

 Vickers, Wyman

Son

M

W

14

Y

Y

Vickers, Jennings

Son

M

W

11

Y

Y

Vickers, Forest

Son

M

W

9

Y

Vickers, Ford

Son

M

W

7

Y

Vickers, Ralph

Son

M

W

4

N

1930 U.S. Census, Wallace, Stone County, Arkansas, dwelling #61.[55]

Vickers, Elihue

Head

M

W

20

N

Y

General farming

Vickers, Clara

Wife

F

W

18

N

Y

 1930 finds these two Vickers households each renting and enumerated next to each other in the community of Wallace. Elihue’s census record carries a note in the margin – “Did not operate farm last year.”[56]A new question for the 1930 census is the age of the person at marriage – W. A. Vickers listed his age at what was probably his first marriage as 22, Daisy listed her age at marriage as 20, Elihue is listed 20 and Clara is listed as 16.[57],[58][Since we know from previous analysis Daisy married at 15, perhaps she was trying to set an example for her sons to wait a bit before marriage.] A new question for the 1930 census asked if the household had a radio set. Neither Vickers’ household had one at the time of the census.

William And Daisy Vickers family all of their children the other couple is Thomas Elihue Vickers and Clara Mae Wade

 

Daisy and William A. Vickers with their sons-picture used by permission from a Vickers cousin

Information on the picture states this is the William & Daisy Vickers family with all of their children, with the other couple Thomas Elihue Vickers and Clare Mae Wade Vickers.  My best guess based on size compared to ages from the 1930 census is starting from the three standing in the back – Wymond, Bordon, Richard. Then Elihue with his wife Clara, Forest, Jennings – standing just behind Ford, Ford, Ralph, Daisy and William. This picture probably taken around 1930.

Ancestry.com family trees indicate William Alfonzo Vickers died in Poinsett County, AR. on 13 Mar 1938.[59] I did not  find his records in the Arkansas Death Indexes, nor any records the family lived in Poinsett County, with my brief search. William and Daisy have a grave marker together at York Cemetery, Marcella, Stone County, AR, with the tombstone indicating both their birth and death dates.[60]

The family might have moved to Poinsett County in eastern Arkansas before William’s death or he might have been working alone there. We do know that Daisy was the widowed head of household renting in nearby Mississippi County, AR for the 1940 census, which stated the family had lived in Mississippi County on 01 April  1935.[61]

Poinsett was one of the Arkansas counties devastated by the Civil War, right on the border of Missouri, Arkansas and Tennessee.[62] The county didn’t start a financial recovery until the railroads came in the 1880s, giving farmers a way to ship their cotton, farm animals and timber to new markets.[63]Many of the small railroad towns boomed, but, still, the county was mostly poor sharecroppers and tenant farmers.[64] Poinsett County was the hardest hit county by the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, flooding thousands of fields and destroying many homes throughout the county.[65] Probably not really pertinent to this family analysis, but, never-the-less interesting, the Southern Tenant Farmers Union was founded in the area in the years after the flood.[66] The organization was an interracial union to improve the pay and working conditions of poor sharecroppers.[67]

Mississippi County, Arkansas was named for the Mississippi River which makes up the eastern border of the county.[68] This county has the unusual arrangement of two county seats – one in Blytheville in the north and one in Osceola in the south.[69]This county also has the unfortunate distinction of being part of the First Congressional District in Arkansas which is the poorest Congressional District in the United States.[70] Mississippi County was known for its rich delta farmland with easy transportation access to the Mississippi River and is known these days as a great area of duck hunting and fishing for northwest Arkansas and southeast Missouri ‘Bootheel’ residents.[71]  

1940 U.S. Census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, dwelling #559.[72]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

# Yrs of School

Vickers, Daisy

Head

F

W

51

5

Vickers, Forest

Son

M

W

19

8

Vickers, Ford

Son

M

W

17

4

Vickers, Ralph

Son

M

W

15

4

1940 U.S. Census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, dwelling #557.[73]

Vickers, Wymon

Head

M

W

24

5

Vickers, Nellie

Wife

F

W

23

1

Vickers, Orace

Son

M

W

4

0

Vickers, Horace

Son

M

W

4

0

Vickers, Betty Sue

Dau

F

W

4/12

0

The 1940 census asked where the family was living in 1935. The Daisy Vickers family was living in Rural, Mississippi Co., AR on 01 Apr 1935.[74] The Wymon Vickers family was living in Rural, Stone Co., AR on 01 Apr 1935.[75] Wymon Vickers is the name of the second son of Daisy and William Vickers, as indicated in earlier census records and Pauline Via’s book. With the Wymon Vickers family living two houses from Daisy Vickers in the 1940 census, a comparison of the age of this Wymon Vickers in previous censuses and that he was living previously in Stone County near other relatives, this Wymon Vickers was very likely the son of Daisy Vickers and had, perhaps, moved close to his mother and youngest brothers to help out after the death of his father.

For last remarks on Daisy, Pauline Via writes a beautiful summary of her life. In describing Daisy’s appearance and her life, Pauline could be describing many of our McIntire relatives.

Daisy was a tall woman, 5’ 9 1/2” and, in later years, had the most beautiful snow white hair. She was a widow for almost 28 years, but made a home for her young sons until they married and moved away from her house. She lived with her youngest son Ralph, for several years after his marriage, then alone in a small house in the back yard of her son Forrest in Lepanto, Arkansas. She spent her last years at the home of her son Richard, suffering from complications of high blood pressure, heart problems and diabetes.

Her fruit salad and jam cake were a tradition for Christmas dinner. Today, when you visit various households of granddaughters, you may find these (especially the fruit salad) as part of the Christmas dinner. As a testimony of her character, her daughters-in-law speak of her with respect and affection.”[76]

If anyone has more to add to Daisy’s story or the recipes for that jam cake or fruit salad, please let me know.

____________

[1] 1900 U.S. Census, Stone County, Arkansas, population schedule, Blue Mountain Township, enumeration district (ED) 129, p. 142A (stamped), sheet 8, dwelling 126, family 126, Mary J. McIntire; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T623,  roll 77.

[2] Pauline Mitchell Pierce [Via], The McIntires and the Elliotts of Bickle’s Cove, Stone County, Arkansas and the Descendants of John McIntire of Maury County, Tennessee, (Palestine, Texas: Pauline Mitchell Pierce [Via], 17557 Hwy 14, Mountain View, AR 72560, 1993), p 84.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 141.

[6] Verbal communication with Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via, June 2013.

[7] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 141.

[8] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 141.

[9] Andrea Musgrove Perisho, “Photo Tour of Stone County, Arkansas,” After Toil Comes Rest, 03 July 2013,            (https://andreamusgroveperisho.com/?p=353 : accessed 13 Oct 2013).

[10] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 249 & 251.

[11] Pauline Mitchell Piearcy Via, email address –  avia@mvtel.net, mailing address – 17557 Hwy 14, Mountain View, AR 72560.

[12] http://local.arkansas.gov/ : accessed 12 Oct 2013.

[13] Ibid.

[14] Don Brown, History and Architectural Heritage of Stone County, (Little Rock, Arkansas: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, unknown publication date), p. 5; digital image, Department of Arkansas Heritage, (http://www.arkansaspreservation.com/pdf/publications/stone_county.pdf  :accessed 12 Oct 2013.)

[15] Brown, History and Architectural Heritage of Stone County, p 5.

[16] Brown, History and Architectural Heritage of Stone County, p 9.

[17] Ibid.

[18] Ibid.

[19] http://local.arkansas.gov/ : accessed 12 Oct 2013.

[20] 1900 U.S. census, Stone Co., Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 142A, dwell. 126, fam. 126, Mary J. McIntire.

[21] Ibid.

[22] Ibid.

[23] Ibid.

[24] Ibid.

[25] Ibid.

[26] Ibid.

[27] Ibid, plus a review of p. 138-147.

[28] 1900 U.S. census, Stone Co., Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 142A, dwell. 126, fam. 126, Mary J. McIntire.

[29] Ibid.

[30] Ibid.

[31] Ibid.

[32] Ibid.

[33] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 68.

[34] 1900 U.S. census, Stone Co., Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 140A, dwell. 96, fam. 96 [dwelling and family originally written as 95, then overwritten as 96], Joseph Simpson.

[35] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 250. [Pierce Via’s citation notes marriage records are from Stone County, Arkansas marriage records, Book B, p 373.]

[36] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 250.

[37] Ibid.

[38] Ibid.

[39] Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 20 Jan 2014), memorial page for Nellie Vickers Albright  (1895-1973), Find A Grave Memorial # 8,807,695, citing Prince Cemetery, Bald Knob, White County, Arkansas.

[40] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 29, 85, 143 and 346.

[41] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 250.

[42] 1910 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, population schedule, Cove Township, enumeration district (ED) 145, p. 206 (stamped), sheet 1A (handwritten), dwelling 9, family 9, W. A. Vickers; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T624,  roll 64.

[43] Ibid.

[44] Ibid.

[45] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014), “Carrigan, Vickers, Densford and Wade Family, Vickers Family, Bridges Family and My Gatewood Family ” entries for Mary Jane Berryhill (1854-abt 1910); submitted by [private user names], citing 1870 and 1900 U. S. Censuses.

[46] Ibid.

[47] 1920 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, population schedule, Cove, enumeration district (ED) 147, p. 2951 (handwritten), sheet 1A (handwritten), dwelling 6, family 6, W. A. Vickers; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T625,  roll 82.

[48] 1920 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 2951, dwell. 9, fam. 9, Cleveland McIntire.

[49] 1920 U.S. census, Cleveland County, Oklahoma, pop., sch., Norman City, enumeration district (ED) 17, p. 9663 (handwritten), sheet 3B (handwritten), dwelling 126, family 58, Jasper A. McIntyre; citing NARA microfilm publication T625,  roll 1456.

[50] “Arkansas County Marriages, 1838–1957,” database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 20 Nov 2014), entry for Nettie Vickers-Silas Albright, 4 July 1914; citing  digital images of originals housed at courthouse, Stone County, Arkansas.

[51] Find A Grave, memorial page for Nellie Vickers Albright(1895-1973), Find A Grave Memorial # 8,807,695, the accompanying photograph by Annette Pillow clearly indicates the birth and death dates.

[52] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014),  “Vickers Family, Evelyn Durlene Humphrey Deichman Family, Vicker Family, Thompson Family, McAndrew, Glaze, Lamb, McIntyre Family and My Gatewood Family ” entries for Otis McIntire (1913-1914); submitted by [private user names].

[53] Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 20 Jan 2014), memorial page for Odis Vickers (1913-1914), Find A Grave Memorial # 14,181,749, citing Cove Cemetery, Mountain View, Stone County, Arkansas; the accompanying photograph by OkieBran indicates parents, the birth date of 01 Mar 1913 and death dates of Nov 1914 [no date of death.]

[54] 1930 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, population schedule, Wallace Township, enumeration district (ED) 69-27, p. 270 (stamped on opposite page), sheet 3B (handwritten), dwelling 60, family 60, W. A. Vickers; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 95.

[55] 1930 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 270, dwell. 61, fam. 61, Elihue Vickers.

[56] Ibid.

[57] 1930 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 270, dwell. 60, fam. 60, William A. Vickers.

[58] 1930 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 270, dwell. 61, fam. 61, Elihue Vickers.

[59] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014),  “Vickers Family, Evelyn Durlene Humphrey Deichman Family, Thompson Family, Hardin Family and Scott Family ” entries for William Alfonzo McIntire (1874-1938); submitted by [private user names].

[60] Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 20 Jan 2014), memorial page for William A. Vickers (1874-1938) and Daisy Vickers (1887-1965), Find A Grave Memorial #6,859,773, citing York Cemetery, Marcella, Stone County, Arkansas, accompanying photograph by Virgil and Deanna C. Cooley.

[61] 1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, population schedule, Dyees township, enumeration district 47-22, p. 430 (stamped), sheet 31A (handwritten), order of visit 559, no family # written, no dwelling # written, Daisy Vickers; digital image,  Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 Oct 2013); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 155.

[63] Ibid.

[64] Ibid.

[65] Ibid.

[66] Ibid.

[67] Ibid.

[69] Ibid.

[70] Ibid.

[71] http://www.mcagov.com/ : accessed 12 Oct 2013.

[72] 1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 430, order of visit 559, Daisy Vickers.

[73] 1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 430, order of visit 557, Wymon Vickers.

[74]1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 430, order of visit 559, Daisy Vickers.

[75] 1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 430, order of visit 557, Wymon Vickers.

[76] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 250.

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

 

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

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Grace Odessa Musgrove 1913-1940 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks: #1

Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of “52 Ancestors” in her blog post Challenge:  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  To help focus my writing, I’ve accepted her challenge with a little catching up to do, but starting with a paternal great-aunt. Here’s Gracie’s story collected from family interviews.

Grace Musgrove

Grace Musgrove

It was breakfast time and Jim was building a fire in the cook stove.[i] Jim was 19, living with his parents and his pretty sister Gracie, two years younger than him. The older children, Bill Jr. and Nora, were already married and gone, though Bill and his growing family lived just down the hill. Gracie was in the kitchen with Jim in the small wooden house behind the main farm-house.

 

James and Grace Musgrove

James and Grace Musgrove

Jim was using green wood and he went to pour some white gas in the cook stove to set the fire. The fire blew up and caught his hand on fire. He hollered and threw the flaming container out the door, just as Gracie was trying to go out the door to get away from the flames. The white gas splashed all over Gracie. She caught on fire and ran outside. Jim grabbed his leather coat hanging by the door, chased Gracie down, got her on the ground and put the fire out.

Their mother, Mary Pennington Musgrove, was a Pentecost and didn’t believe in doctors, so they put Grace Odessa to bed, prayed over her and tried to make her comfortable. Someone told them to keep Gracie warm, so they kept her in the kitchen with a fire in the cook stove. She was in terrible pain, only somewhat comfortable when sitting in her beloved father’s lap, her skin coming off on his overalls.

Aunt Dessi, Mary Pennington Musgrove’s sister, heard about the accident. No one knows exactly how she heard. There were no telephones in Powell, Oklahoma in 1940. Perhaps a letter was written. Never the less, as soon as she learned of the accident, she, her husband Jesse and young Jerry, their nephew and cousin to Gracie and Jim, packed up in the Buick and drove the 120 miles south from McLoud. They arrived about a week after the accident; the smell of decaying flesh in the 90 degree kitchen was overwhelming. Aunt Dessi, with Gracie carrying her middle name, insisted Gracie be taken to the hospital. An ambulance was called, over the protests of Gracie’s mother, Mary Pennington Musgrove, who threw such a fit she was placed in a straight jacket by the ambulance attendants.

Grace Musgrove - about age 17.

Grace Musgrove – about age 17.

Gracie died a few days later in a Oklahoma City hospital. Funeral services were held on a Sunday afternoon at the Holiness Church in McLoud, Oklahoma.[ii]

Gracie’s boyfriend from when she lived in McLoud, Johnnie Henderson, helped to dig her grave. Johnnie later worked at Tinker Air Force Base, married and still has family in the area.

Aunt Dessie and, her husband, Jesse Smith had just one son, Kenneth Eugene Smith, born in 1917, and purchased three burial plots in Dale, Oklahoma, near their home. Kenneth had told them he wouldn’t use his plot. So Grace Odessa Musgrove was the first to be buried in those three plots. Her grave can be found next to her Aunt Dessi and Uncle Jesse’s at Dale Cemetery, Dale, Oklahoma.

Gracie’s death was hard on the family, especially Jim, as his mother constantly reminded him that he had killed his sister. A few years later, he joined the navy. Then, he went to school on the GI bill. He met a woman in college. They married and her two young sons took his name. They later divorced. Jim became a shop teacher, first in Bokchito, then for many years in the Sasakwa High School. When my great-uncle Jim died there was no one to bury him, so my dad had his body transported to our small town and buried Uncle Jim in the local cemetery, in one of my dad’s own suits.

_______

Author’s notes: All locations are in Oklahoma.  Information for this article was collected from family interviews. Due to current Oklahoma laws, a death certificate is not available. All pictures are in the possession of Andrea Musgrove Perisho, from the collection of [NAME FOR PRIVATE USE] passed down from William Walker (Bill) Musgrove Jr. and Eva Evalina Buckmaster Musgrove.

 

[i] [NAMES FOR PRIVATE USE], a nephew, a niece and a cousin of Grace Musgrove, Bryan County, Oklahoma, interviews by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, July 2013; interview notes privately held by interviewer, [private address], 2013.

[ii] “Lamp Burns Take the Life of Powell Girl – Death Claims Grace Musgrove at Oklahoma City Hospital,” Madill Record, March 1940.

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

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The Search for Dovey Continues – Reverse Genealogy & DNA to Find Living Relatives

With few results from the search for documents on the possible father of Dovey Alpine Piearcy, DNA offers some hope to try to find family for Dovey.

As you may recall, Dovey, my father’s mother’s mother, my great-grandmother, was born four years before her parents married when both James Wesley (Jim) Piearcy and Bertie Wellington were each 14 years old. Family stories say Dovey was born in 1889-90 in Texas, but no records show where either Bertie or Jim were at that time.

I administer kits for nine family members tested at FTDNA, in addition to my own tests at Ancestry.com, FTDNA and 23andMe.

First, I contacting the four people who looked like a Piearcy match from family trees on Ancestry.com. Two of the four responded, saying they weren’t related to the Piearcys. No luck there.

Next, I did reverse genealogy on Rosa Belle Piearcy, the younger daughter of Jim and Bertie Piearcy. Genealogy typically tracks back to prior generations; with reverse genealogy we search forward to find later generations.  If  living daughters/granddaughters of Rosa’s daughters would agree to DNA testing, both autosomal and mt-DNA tests would be performed. If the autosomal test indicated the women were cousins to my father and his sisters and if the mt-DNA test matched my father, then we could presume Bertie was Dovey’s mother. But only if I had other known Piearcy cousins tested to triangulate the match, proving the DNA really was from the Piearcy/Wellington marriage.

I was able to find Rosa’s Texas death certificate, thanks to Karen Stanbary the leader of Mastering Genealogical Proof study group 18.[1] The death certificate listed Rosa’s parents as J. W. Piearey and Bertie Wellington and was signed by Bertha Davis.[2]  Ancestry.com family trees listed Rosa’s children, including Bertha and named Bertha’s husband, Jess W. Davis. A search of newspaper clippings on Genealogybank.com  located Bertha’s husband’s  obit, listing  two daughters.[3] A further search of Genealogybank.com located obits for those two daughters and listed their daughters. No further names will be listed to protect the living people.

A google search of those two women gave me their addresses and one phone number. I prepared letters to the great grand daughters  of Rosa and included a picture of the Jim and Bertie Piearcy family taken about 1906 along with my phone number. I mailed the letters with great anticipation. By a month later, no envelope with a bad address was returned to me, but I had no phone calls either. A call to the available number indicated it had been disconnected.  A google search located several other phone numbers, all disconnected. 411 information calls yielded no phone numbers. The website, Spokeo had a current phone number and email for one of the husbands, but $1.98 later, both the phone number and email were no longer working. None of the involved names had Facebook or Linked-in accounts. So much for my first efforts use reverse genealogy.

From her death certificate, we know Rosa Piearcy Merritt died at the age of 55 as a widow. Ancestry.com trees show she had five children. Reverse genealogy on Bertha has led to a dead end. Another daughter, Laura, died of appendicitis at 10 years of age. A third daughter has no information on Ancestry.com, but another daughter and son had children. Next steps include identifying living descendants of those children, then if that doesn’t work, identifying living descendants of Rosa’s brothers as the search continues for Dovey’s parents.



[1] Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013).

[2] “Texas, Deaths, 1890-1976,” index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1951-25176-94928-31?cc=1983324&wc=MMTK-3Z9:n1365956281 : accessed 05 Jan 2014), Death certificates > 1950 > Vol 123, certificates 061001-061500, Feb-Oct, Travis-Matagorda counties, includes delay; citing State Registrar Office, Austin.

[3] “Jess W. Davis obit,” The Corpus Christi Caller-Times [TX], 15 Jan 2007, on-line archives, (http://www.genealogybank.com/gbnk/obituaries/doc/obit/116B5E6559B25A98-116B5E6559B25A98 : accessed 7 Jan 2014).

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
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Search for Dovey Alpine Piearcy’s Parents Continues

As you may recall from an earlier blog, Dovey Alpine Piearcy was my great-grandmother. I have good sources for my grandparents and four family lines back to Revolutionary War ancestors, but I’ve moved back to collecting sources for all my great grandparents. Dovey is a problem, since she was born four years before her parents married, when James Wesley Piearcy and Bertie Wellington would have each been 14 years old. Dovey is the brick wall research project that I chose for my Mastering Genealogical Proof case study – again see that earlier blog.

Here’s a picture of the James Welsey Piearcy family, probably taken about 1907 based on the age and size of the younger children. Dovey is in the white dress with the dark hair. I’ve obtained the marriage record for Dovey and Andrew Jackson Buckmaster married in the Chickasaw Nation, Indian Nation in 1907, six months before statehood. I wonder if Dovey is wearing her wedding dress for this picture, since her outfit is different than the other family members. Though women generally didn’t wear white for their weddings in those day.

Piearcy James Wesley family about 1915

 James Wesley Piearcy family about 1907

 

There is no indication of race on the marriage records for Andrew Jackson Buckmaster and Dovey Piearcy. The Chickasaw Nation was the legal authority in the area at that time, recording marriages of Indians and Whites.

The leader of our MGP study group found Dovey’s sister (or half-sister maybe) Rosa/Rosie’s death certificate in Texas. She also noticed one of the Choctaw citizenship applications (that I had) listed Bertie as Bertie Daisy Deen Piearcy, so that’s a lead that maybe Bertie was perhaps married to a Deen. (By the way, all the Piearcy Choctaw citizenship applications were denied.) So maybe Dovey was a Deen. I’ve also been contacting lots of paternal DNA cousins trying to find a DNA connection to Bertie Wellington/Willington/Worthington (all the different spellings for last name of Bertie’s father – John Wellington), Dovey Alpine Piearcy or James Welsey Piearcy.  No luck there yet, but if you are a cousin in this line who has had DNA testing performed or are interested in having it performed, please contact me. Or if you are a Deen and anything about this family sounds familiar to you, please contact me. . .

 Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
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Constitution Week Celebration – Daughters of the American Revolution

The tradition of celebrating the Constitution was started many years ago by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR). The aims of the celebration are to (1) emphasize citizens’ responsibilities for protecting and defending the Constitution, preserving it for posterity;  (2) inform the people that the Constitution is the basis for America’s great heritage and the foundation for our way of life; and (3) encourage the study of the historical events which led to the framing of the Constitution in September 1787. Right click on this link and open link in a new tab to see President General Young’s post on Constitution Week – http://youngblog.dar.org/.

The DAR encourages local chapters to celebrate  Constitution Week with proclamations and other events. Here in Southwest Florida, area chapters hold an annual Constitution Week Luncheon hosted by one of the chapters. This year, my chapter, the Lawrence Kearny Chapter based in Cape Coral, Florida,  was the hostess. We’re a small chapter with about 25 members. About eight of us helped with the event. As a very new member, I volunteered to handle decorations with the theme “Let Freedom Ring.”

Centerpiece DAR LuncheonCenterpieces were based on a wooden stand borrowed from the Barefoot Beach Chapter.1 A free clip art picture of the liberty bell was found on the internet and sent to Walgreen’s photo center where a navy blue border with stars was selected for the 5 X 7 picture. The red poster board mat was added after “Let Freedom Ring” was printed across the top. The back of the centerpiece had selected facts from the National Constitution Center.

Flag CookieFor the favors, rather than a pencil or a copy of the Constitution, we decided to make cookies. Our theme was “Let Freedom Ring,” so we went with flag and liberty bell cookies. A friend and I made a prototype batch of cookies and decided sprinkles on the frosting was not the look we were going for, so we googled flag cookies. Of course, Martha Stewart has a video on how to make flag cookies. Right click on this link and open in a new tab to see Liberty Bell Cookiethe video –http://www.marthastewart.com/247789/flag-cookie.   We followed Martha’s video, other than using our previously purchased smaller cookie cutters. After icing, the cookies were wrapped and sealed with a Lawrence Kearny sticker. So, one hundred and eighty cookies later, we’re a lot better at piping royal icing, but still not ready for a job in the Publix grocery store bakery. 

The centerpieces and the cookies were a big hit, but even more impressive were the Southwest Florida Handbell Ensemble directed by Michael Helman and the speech by Rev. Dr. H. Timothy Halverson, Senior Pastor, Faith Presbyterian Church. Altogether, our small city of Cape Coral did a fine job of hostessing the Greater Southwest Florida chapters at our Constitution Week celebration.

Now, enough of this and back to genealogy research – more homework with the Mastering Genealogical Proof study group and a brick wall in finding my great-grandmother Dovey Alpine Piearcy’s parents.2 Then working up the information from my summer research trips.

SOURCES

  1. The wooden stand was hand-made and donated to the Barefoot Beach Chapter. The base is 10″ in diameter. The stand is about 9″ tall and 7″ wide. The wooden pen holder is about 2″ square and drilled through in order to hold a pen, feather or flower arrangement, in this case. The back should be decorated as well, if you use it for a round table centerpiece.
  2. National Genealogical Society, “Mastering Genealogical Proof,” NGS Special Publications(http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/ : accessed 09 Sept 2013).
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
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Mastering Genealogical Proof Study Group

Since mid-August, I’ve participated in an on-line study group covering Thomas W. Jones’ book Mastering Genealogical Proof.1,2 This new book has the genealogy community excited, with case studies and questions/answers showing us how to apply respected standards to come up with acceptable conclusions.

Angela Packer McGhie, administrator of the ProGen Study Program, in her Adventures in Genealogy Education blog has just announced five more study groups are forming.3 DearMYRTLE has just completed a study group; the YouTube videos are still available.4  I’ve reviewed those chapter 2 videos to help me understand that chapter’s difficult, for me, concepts.

While working on my family history, I want to learn professional techniques so my research can be used by others. One assignment in MGP is to select a brick wall in your own family tree and use the techniques in the book to break through that brick wall.

For my brick wall, I selected my great-grandmother Dovey Alpine Piearcy Buckmaster, with my research question – “Who were her parents?” The answer to that question seemed pretty clear-cut, until I really started gathering sources for her. Dovey wasn’t listed as a great-granddaughter of Tryphena McGinnis Piearcy in her petition for Choctaw citizenship, as were Dovey’s two younger siblings. (See my earlier post for Tryphena’s petition.) Then I pulled out my paper files on Dovey, including the original marriage records for James Wesley Piearcy and Bertie Wellington. From the calculation of Dovey’s age from the 1900 census, Dovey was born in 1889/90, four years before her parents married in 1894. Both Jim and Bertie were fourteen years old in 1889/90. It really doesn’t seem likely Jim and Bertie would have a child when they were fourteen, then marry four years later. Possible, but not likely.

In chapter 2 of the study group, one of our assignments is to develop a locality guide with all the possible sources of information, to assure a reasonably exhaustive search for records. So far, I’ve written a locality guide for Ozark County, Missouri, where Bertie’s parents married. I’ve found extensive records on Bertie’s mother, Lucinda Webster, but little on Bertie’s father. Family records say his name was John Wellington and his two children , Daniel and Bertie, have their last name recorded as Wellington. So far, I’ve found John’s last name spelled as Wilington and Worlington; maybe that’s why no one has any records of John’s parents.

My next step is to gather information for a locality guide for Arkansas and while I’m at it, see if I can find any records of John and Lucinda Webster Wellington in Arkansas, using a wild card surname search of W*lington. I want to find out where Bertie was nine months before Dovey was born, so I’d love to find records in the 1888-89 time frame. Unfortunately, the 1890 census was destroyed in a fire, so that’s not available.

After that comes a locality guide for Texas, particularly Clay County, where James Wesley Piearcy and Bertie Wellington married in 1894.

It really may take DNA testing to break down this brick wall, so if you are a Piearcy cousin and are interested in DNA testing please contact me. In the meantime, I’ll keep working on this brick wall and through my study of MGP learn more about foot notes, several of which should have included on the above material. But stay posted, I’ll have more blogs on this family lines, with proper footnotes.

Here’s more about the book from the NGS website – Mastering Genealogical Proof aims to help researchers, students, and new family historians reconstruct relationships and lives of people they cannot see. It presents content in digestible chunks. Each chapter concludes with problems providing practice for  proficiently applying the chapter’s concepts. Those problems, like examples throughout the book, use real records, real research, and real issues. Answers are at the back of the book along with a glossary of technical terms and an extensive resource list.5

Contents

  • Preface
  • Chapter 1 – Genealogy’s Standard of Proof
  • Chapter 2 – Concepts Fundamental to the GPS
  • Chapter 3 – GPS Element 1: Thorough Research
  • Chapter 4 GPS Element 2: Source Citations
  • Chapter 5 GPS Element 3: Analysis and Correlation
    Chapter 6 GPS Element 4: Resolving Conflicts and Assembling Evidence
  • Chapter 7 GPS Element 5: The Written Conclusion
  • Chapter 8 – Using the GPS
  • Chapter 9 – Conclusion
  • Appendix A – Pritchett Article
  • Appendix B – McLain Article
  • Glossary
  • Reading and Source List
  • Answers to exercises

MGP can be ordered through the NGS website. If you are a member, log in first, to get the discount.

SOURCES

  1. Thomas W. Jones Ph.D, CG, CGL, FASG, FUGA, FNGS is certified by the Board for Certification of Genealogists as a Certified Genealogist and Certified Genealogical Lecturer, and is a Fellow of the American Society of Genealogists, Utah Genealogical Society and the National Genealogical Society.  He has co-edited the National Genealogical Society Quarterly since 2002 and is a trustee and a past president of the Board for Certification of Genealogists.
  2. Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013).
  3. Angela Packer McGhie, “Five Gen Proof Study Groups Open for Registration,” Adventures in Genealogy Education, posted 07 Sept 2013 (http://genealogyeducation.blogspot.com : accessed 09 Sept 2013).
  4. Pat Richley-Erickson, “MGP Study Group – Hangouts on Air,” DearMYRTLE, posted 17 Mar 2013 (http://blog.dearmyrtle.com : accessed 09 Sept 2013). [NOTE: While DearMYRTLE’s MGP Study Group is finished, the YouTube videos are still available, accessed 09 Sept 2013, to watch the videos just click on the video tab in DearMYRTLE’s YouTube.
  5. National Genealogical Society, “Mastering Genealogical Proof,” NGS Special Publications(http://www.ngsgenealogy.org/ : accessed 09 Sept 2013).
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
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Finding Todd, Haynes and Francis Cousins with DNA


dnaBefore DNA testing on four more known relatives is done, this week I worked on my parents Family Tree DNA autosomal testing results, looking for cousins.

For my mother, we already have DNA matches with two known distant Todd cousins and one known McIntire cousin. After assigning those known relationships in FTDNA, I was able to use the filter matches by the “in common with…” feature. First, I selected my mother and a Todd cousin. Thirty nine people came up as having the same shared DNA. Of those, six matches were estimated at 3rd or 4th cousins.

FTDNA has a feature to keep track of your notes. On all thirty-nine people, I made a note of the date and the match. Again, through FTDNA, I was able to send messages to the six matches. Many people, myself included, administer DNA accounts for others, so in the body of the message, I’ve learned to always include the name of both matches and to include my family names and geography. You get a better response than just saying “Hey, we match.”   If I do a little more work upfront, not expecting the other person to figure out the match,  I get better responses.

But before sending out messages, I went through the same “in common with…” matching process with the other Todd cousin and with the McIntire cousin, documenting all the matches in notes. Some people matched both Todd cousins and some people only matched one. A couple of people matched the Todd cousins and the McIntire cousin!

Out of a total of 115 possible matches between my mother’s DNA and her three known 3rd or 4th cousins, FTDNA identified eighteen new people as possible 3rd or 4th cousins.

From the messages to these possible cousins, within two days, I had responses from ten people – one who was able to immediately identify himself as a descendant of Walker Todd, my 4th great-grandfather. I’ve talked with my mother’s new 2nd cousin 2X removed. He’s sent me video of the Todd Cemetery in Cannon County, Tennessee, where I hope to visit someday.

As I was responding to the followup messages, I realized I needed to have my place names better organized to sort by city/county/state. When I have Oklahoma City listed in my Family Tree Maker place name as OKC, OK City, Okla. City, and Oklahoma City, those don’t sort, nor does AR, Ark., ARK, and Arkansas. It took two solid days of data entry using the “check unrecognized place names to resolve misspelling and other errors” function, which pulled up over 4500 place names to be checked. After the cleanup, I was down to 2214 place names for the 5674 people in my tree and the place sort function was now useful. (Now I need to do the people clean-up, but that’s another week.)

Another response yielded a match in our documents to a descendant of a brother of Elvira/Elmira Haynes, so we now have potential DNA identified on the Haynes line from this 3rd cousin.

So basically, in the searches, we’re looking for DNA matches where people have a documented paper trail that matches our ancestors. Then we assume the DNA comes from the documented ancestor, realizing assuming can get us in trouble. The goal is to have two or three matches showing the same gene sequence, then you can confirm the relationship.

While I was working away on my mother’s matches, I received an email from a woman about a possible match with my father’s DNA. She did a really great job of sending me her family names and dates. After trading several emails and chasing a couple of red herrings, we identified a match in our paper trails to John Riley Francis and Margaret “Peggy” Davidson – my father’s 3rd great grandparents. Mary Pennington Musgrove, my dad’s grandmother, was the daughter of Elnora Melvina Francis, who was the daughter of John Riley and Peggy. So dad has a new confirmed 4th cousin.

Now I can run the “in common with…” feature in FTDNA for each of my parents and their new cousins to find more new cousins and hope for responses. That will keep me busy until other four kits are completed, but now, I need to get back to work for my study group covering Mastering Genealogical Proof and then download and label documents off the flippal and camera from my summer research trips – a different kind of fun than working with DNA testing.1

1. Thomas W. Jones, Mastering Genealogical Proof (Arlington, Virginia: National Genealogical Society, 2013).

 
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

 

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Serendipity on the Research Trail

One of my primary goals on a recent genealogy research trip to Oklahoma and Texas was to find a book with the genealogy research of Norma Ennis Musgrove Craig, a first cousin 2X removed. Norma’s book summarizes her 40+ years of  genealogy research on our Musgrove/Musgrave family. I learned of the  book, which contained childhood pictures of my grandfather, through a Google search and ordered the microfilm through the Family History Center. 1 I was able to make copies of each page, but the microfilm pictures weren’t very clear. I wanted better copies of the pictures.

As part of preplanning for the trip, I had contacted everyone on Ancestry.com who seemed to have good sources for Norma or her sister Beulah, who wrote many of the charming family stories in the book. Beulah had passed away in 2003 and Norma in 2008. Only one person responded. Evidently when Beulah died, another family member got the house and the contents, including the genealogy research and the book. No one had seen any of materials since then.

I planned stops in Holdenville, Ada and the Oklahoma History Center, since Norma and Beulah had connections in each of those places. I researched each of those sites ahead of time to find the hours of operation, days open and any other pertinent information.

The Hughes County Historical Society in Holdenville was listed on-line, but with a disconnected phone number, no other contact information nor hours of operation.2 Since I had no idea what hours the HCHS would be open and since it  was the direction I was traveling, that was my first stop.  After a two and one half hour drive from Tulsa, I was standing in front of the closed doors of the dark HCHS building. My heart sank as I scanned the doors and windows finding no contact information nor hours of operation. As I turned to my car to rethink my next step, a man in a pickup truck stopped at the light called out “Are you trying to get in the museum?” When I answered yes, he continued with “Go to the business two doors down. They’ll have the phone number to reach someone.”

Two doors down, they did give me the name and seven digit phone number of the HCHS coordinator. Back in my car, I dialed the number using what I thought was the most likely area code. No luck, I reached someone in western OK. Next, I tried the other OK area code. Number out of service. Rats! Back to the business two doors down. They reminded me of the third OK area code, which I had forgotten in my sixteen years out of the state, and probably didn’t even need to use any way to reach the number.

Then the woman asked what I was looking for. I told my story about the book, the sister from Holdenville, etc., etc. She stopped me asking “What was the sister’s name?” When I gave her Beulah’s name, she just looked at me and said “You should just talk to her son. He owns the business across the street.”

Across the street, Beulah’s son was busy with customers, but his daughter, who did not typically work with her father, was filling in for the day.  After some discussion about the family, probably to confirm who I really was, the daughter told me the same story about a family member getting Beulah’s house and no one having access to that research any more. Then she told me, Norma’s daughter had all of Norma’s records. She gave me Norma’s daughter’s name and address.3

After a conversation establishing who I was, a meeting with Norma’s daughter was set up for the next Saturday morning. The records had been stored since Norma’s death, with no one else in the family interested in them. Norma had some strokes before her death, but still tried to work with her research, getting it mixed up. It would take a few days for the daughter to get the records organized enough for us to review.

On Saturday morning, I was given an original copy of Norma’s book, with the original picture of my grandfather and his two siblings along with much of Norma’s original research on my family line, including pictures, marriage licenses, wills, etc. In addition, I was able to conduct about two hours of interviews of Norma’s daughter, who remembered my 2nd great grandmother, Myzella Medcalf Musgrove. I was able to take pictures of a quilt made by Myzella.  The quilt was registered with the Oklahoma Historical Society, as being over 100 years old.4

One of the stories during the interview was how Norma got some grief from family members with some of her research results. Norma’s grandfather, William Tate Musgrove, my 2nd great grandfather, had evidently told the family he was Irish and had come to America on a ship.Norma’s research showed a paper trail where William Tate, a Civil War veteran who fought with the 42nd Regiment, Indiana Volunteers was not only born in the United States, but his family had been here since 1747. Norma and Beulah both became DAR members through Samuel Musgrave, William Tate’s great grandfather. I was able to share that my father’s y-DNA test linked him to other descendants of Oswin Musgrave who arrived in Pennsylvania about 1682, confirming Norma’s paper trail.6 By the way, in Norma’s book, she included William Tate’s nickname of Flannel Mouth, earned with the tall tales he was known for telling.7

All the information collected on these two trips will certainly keep me busy until my next genealogy field trip.

1. Craig, Norma Ennis Musgrove and Beulah Musgrove Berryman. Musgrave–Musgrove, 1747-1986, [Self published. Place of publication not indicated.], 1987. Microfilm of typescript (photocopy, 157, [8] leaves) at the Rockport Public Library, Rockport, Indiana. Family History Library, film 1502916 item 9;  (https://familysearch.org/eng/library/fhlcatalog/mainframeset.asp:accessed 12 Aug 2013.)

2. Hughes County Historical Society, www.okgenweb.org/~okhughes/resources.htm. Currently open 9:30-1:00 on Saturdays, as of July 2013.

3. Names and identifying information of living persons have not been used to protect their privacy. If you have a specific need to know, please contact me at amperisho@gmail.com.

4. http://www.okhistory.org/research/folkquilt As of 12 Aug 2013, the Oklahoma History Center website shows a couple of examples of old quilts, but doesn’t list pictures of all the quilts submitted. I’ll post my pictures in a later blog.

5. While the 1880 census shows the father of William Tate Musgrove born in New Jersey and his mother born in Pennsylvania, the 1900 and 1910 schedules indicate his parents were born in Ireland.

1880 U. S. Census, Justice Precinct 3, Collin County, Texas, population schedule (1st enumeration),  enumeration district (ED) 22, p. 32 (penned), line 25, dwelling 211, family 225, W. T. Musgrave; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 12 Aug 2013); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm roll 1296, enumeration district (ED) 022, p. 135D; imaged from FHL microfilm 1255296.

1900 U. S. Census, Bates Township, Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, population schedule  (1st enumeration),  enumeration district (ED) 192, p. 9A (penned), line 15, dwelling 186, family 186, William Musgrove; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 12 Aug 2013); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm roll 1342, enumeration district (ED) 0192, p 9A; imaged  from FHL microfilm 1241342.

1910 U. S. Census, Pottawatomie Township, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma,  enumeration district 230, p. 6A (penned), line 3, dwelling 98, family 99, William T. Musgrave; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 12 Aug 2013); citing National Archives and Records Administration microfilm roll T624_1265, enumeration district (ED) 0230, page 6A; imaged from FHL microfilm 1375278.

6.  Musgrave, Duane and Marie Wilson Musgrave, A History of the Moses Musgrave Family, Quakers, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Kansas, and Further West, Evansville Bindery Inc, Evansville, Indiana, 1998.

7.  Craig and Berryman, Musgrave-Musgrove, 1747-1986, p. 43.

 Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
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Photo Tour of Stone County, Arkansas

In the 1800s,  Stone County, Arkansas was home to our Eoffs, Eliotts, McIntires and Todds. Last week, two fourth cousins gave me a grand tour of Stone County. My gracious hosts were Alfred Via  and Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via, recently married and 3rd cousins themselves. Alfred was raised in Bickle’s Cove and while Pauline is a proud Texan, she has done enough genealogy research in the area to feel like a native.

For those of you that recognize Pauline’s name, she is the author of The McIntires and the Elliotts of Bickle’s Cove, Stone County, Arkansas and descendents of John McIntire of Maury County, Tennessee. She still has a few copies left, a great hardback book with over 500 pages of research and source documents. Let me know if you want to purchase the book and I’ll put you in touch with Pauline. The book is $65. I was able to use the documentation in the book for my successful DAR application with Jacob Eoff as the patriot ancestor.

Here is the photo tour, which included the McIntire cabin on private property. We had permission to visit the site. In the winter, with no leaves on the trees, I’m told the cabin is visible from the road. Even with bug spray, we got chiggers and ticks. Didn’t see any snakes, though!

John and Mary Jane McIntire lived in this cabin, where my great-grandfather Hendrix McIntire was raised. Stories indicate John McIntire was a stone mason. The old stone fireplace is still straight and strong, as is the foundation to the cabin, though the cabin may not last much longer. 

McIntire Cabin, Stone County, AR with Pauline and Alfred Via. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

McIntire Cabin, Stone County, AR with Pauline and Alfred Via. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Front of McIntire Cabin. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Front of McIntire Cabin. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Well at McIntire Cabin. Well has filled in. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Well at McIntire Cabin. Well has filled in. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Straight fireplace, McIntire Cabin, June 2013, photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Straight fireplace, McIntire Cabin, June 2013, photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

McIntire cabin - thistle's growing around cabin. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

McIntire cabin – thistle’s growing around cabin. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Bickles Cove Cemetery

Alfred Via holding Bickle's Cove Cemetery sign, which was torn off by a backhoe. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Alfred Via holding Bickle’s Cove Cemetery sign, which was torn off by a backhoe. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via with Samuel and Elizabeth Eoff crypts. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via with Samuel and Elizabeth Eoff crypts. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

McIntire headstone. Bickle's Cove Cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

McIntire headstone. Bickle’s Cove Cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Alfred Via pointing to his mother's name, where children are listed on back of McIntire headstone. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Alfred Via pointing out a name, where children are listed on back of McIntire headstone. June 2013. Photo taken by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Old McIntire Lane. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Old McIntire Lane. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Creek near cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Creek near cemetery. June 2013. Photo by Andrea Musgrove Perisho.

Mountain View, Stone County, Arkansas is in the scenic Ozarks, well worth the trip for the scenery alone, but when you add the family connections, the area is even more special. In a later blog, we’ll visit the court house.

 
Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

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Unemployment Relief Census of 1933 – Transcribed by Oklahoma Historical Society

While on the Oklahoma Historical Society website yesterday, I found the following information about the 1933 Relief Census. Here’s the link  to the site:  http://www.okhistory.org/research/reliefcensus. (Right click and select open in a new window.)

On this site listed as heads of household were both my maternal and paternal grandfathers, Carl Holder (listed as Carroll Holder, age 28 in 1933, a farmer with 4 people in the family and living in Wade, OK, which all matches Daddy Holder) and William Musgrove (age 24, a farmer with 3 people in the family and living in Oklahoma County). Also included in the census as heads of household were two of Daddy Holder’s brothers, E.F. and Joe, along with their father, G.B.

Within a few years, both my grandfathers, Carl Holder and William Musgrove, were able to buy their own farms.

For a genealogist, this census gives us another tool to place people in a particular place and social context.

In order to be on “the dole,” most likely, the family could not own any land. The head of household may have had to be of a certain age. A quick search today did not list the criteria for being on the dole in Oklahoma, but each state set up their own criteria until Roosevelt established the Federal Employment Relief Act in late 1933. I’ve requested a book on the Depression in Oklahoma, which may give more information.

From the site:

The OHS Research Center staff and volunteers have transcribed Oklahoma records for   unemployment relief. These records offer insight into the economic status of Oklahomans during the 1930s. There are more than 100,000 names included in this database.

The OHS Research Division’s manuscript archives include information for several counties. These records are located in the William H. Murray Collection [1982.294]. The records are fairly uniform and consist of typed pages.

  1. Beaver County
  2. Blaine County
  3. Bryan County
  4. Caddo County
  5. Canadian County
  6. Cotton County
  7. Craig County
  8. Creek County
  9. Logan County
  10. McCurtain County
  11. McIntosh County
  12. Muskogee County
  13. Noble County
  14. Nowata Count
  15. Okfuskee County
  16. Oklahoma County
  17. Okmulgee County
  18. Ottawa County
  19. Pawnee County
  20. Payne County
  21. Pottawatomie County
  22. Sequoyah County
  23. Texas County
  24. Tillman Count
  25. Tulsa County
  26. Wagoner County
  27. Woodward County

 

Copyright © 2013 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

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