Samuel Musgrave and Elizabeth Brand – Revolutionary War Service

Musgrave

Samuel Musgrave – Revolutionary War Patriot

Samuel was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania in 1747. He was one of eight children born to Moses Musgrove Jr. and Elizabeth, who’s last name is unknown. He moved to Fayette County, PA., then to Muhlenburgh County, Kentucky, and finally, to Warwick County, Indiana. Samuel is the third generation of his family to live in what became the United States of America. His parents and grandparents were Quakers, who did not believe in war and fighting. So Samuel, as a soldier in the Revolutionary War, could not have participated in Quaker services, until reinstated to the Monthly Meeting, after confessing his sins. There is no evidence this ever happened.

“Samuel married Elizabeth Brand on September 10, 1767 in Pennsylvania.” Most of the information we have on him is from his Revolutionary War pension applications. The information within the quotation marks has been summarized by Richard Graham Musgrove and Samuel’s 5th great grand-daughter, Jennifer Berryman at the behest of her grandmother, Beulah Arlene Musgrove Berryman and great-aunt, Norma Ennis Musgrove Craig.

“Samuel began his military service as a Private in the Cumberland County militia. He was assigned to the 4th Battalion and served in the 8th Company. He refers to his immediate superior officer as “Captain Jack.”His first day’s march carried them toward Shippenstown, now named Shippensburg. A sixty mile march to the Susquehanna River carried them through Carlisle. He related that they “went on the river” to Lancaster County where they enjoyed a short few days of rest. Captain Jack took his men down the main road to Chester County and to Philadelphia. (When traveling through Lancaster and Chester Counties, he was traveling near the area where he was born and raised.) Crossing the Schuylkill River on a floating bridge, they arrived in Philadelphia and were given ten days rest after being assigned to barracks.

“They next traveled by sloop on the Delaware River to Trenton, New Jersey.

Revolutionary War Flag

With Long Island, New York, as their destination, they marched through Princeton and arrived in time for the battle on August 27, 1776. Approximately 3,500 colonists were under the command of Generals Washington, Sullivan, Putnam and Sterling. They suffered casualties of about 300 killed and 1,100 wounded or captured while facing a superior force of British troops. Using fog to cover their departure, the colonists crossed the East River in small boats. His unit returned to Philadelphia and, after a few days was verbally discharged and told to return to his home.

“He was welcomed with open arms by Elizabeth and four children, Huldah, Moses, Mary and Samuel Davies. During this break in his militia service, David was born. In July 1777, Samuel began another three months of service in the militia. He relates that his officers were William Duffle, George Crawford and John Cunningham who were under the command of Colonel Jonas McCoy. His company marched into Delaware and remained there a short time until General Washington moved his army back to New Port, Pennsylvania. Recrossing the Brandywine River, his company joined forces with a battalion of riflemen under a Colonel Erwin. As a part of a scouting party, Samuel was sent to Tron Hill to determine the size of the British force and their positions. (Battle of Brandywine.)

“He and others of his militia were sent to march with a group of Regulars to Chadd’s Ford where they were positioned to the right of the army for the battle which occurred on September 11, 1777. This time the colonists were more evenly matched. About 11,000 men fought under General Washington. British Generals Howe, Cornwallis and Knyphausen led about 12,500 troops and suffered 90 killed and 480 wounded or captured.

“Following the battle, Samuel’s unit returned to Philadelphia. He was ill and furloughed for two weeks. He stayed with his sister at Chadd’s Ford. Upon return to his unit, he was still too ill to travel and, since his three months were up, was discharged.

“In 1782, he was drafted again to serve his country as an Indian scout (spy-from DAR records.)Leaving behind two more children, James and Elizabeth, he served two months. Scouting in groups of five, six or seven men, they were based in a stockade fort at Hannahtown, Pennsylvania (the town had been burned by Indians) and served under Lt. Robert Ritche.

Their remaining children were born following this last term of service to his country. Sarah, Jane and William were born in Fayette County, Pennsylvania and the youngest, Ann in Monongalia County, Virginia, now West Virginia.

Samuel and Elizabeth moved to Warrick County, Indiana.”*

Samuel Musgrove was awarded a pension for his Revolutionary War Service receiving $26.66 per annum from March 4, 1821, issued December 9, 1833.

Samuel Musgrave, Revolutionary War Patriot Gravestone

Elizabeth Musgrove also applied for a pension on January 30, 1843, age 93, from Warwick County, Ind., as the widow of Samuel Musgrove, who had died on September 2, 1834. Bible records proving the birth dates of their children were filed: Huldah, b 10 June 1768; Moses, b 8 May 1770; Mary, b 22 June 1772; Samuel Davies, b 22 mar 1775; David, b 22 Nov 1776; Elizabeth, b 25 July 1781; Sarah, b 21 Nov 1783; William, b 19 May 1788; Margaret, b 17 June 1780 and Ann, b 19 Dec 1790. Their son, Moses, is our ancestor.

NOTE: In DAR records and in the National Genealogical Society Quarterly article, Samuel’s last name is listed as MUSGROVE, though other records, including gravestone, say MUSGRAVE.

Sources

*Extensive quotes for Samuel, Moses and Enos Musgrave from “The American Family Musgrove,” by Richard Graham Musgrove.

“National Genealogical Society Quarterly: Abstracts of Revolutionary War Pension Applications.”

Samuel Musgrove – Pension Claim W9211, PA service, Indiana Agency.; Certificate 25203. Act 7 June 1832.

“Roster of Soldiers and Patriots of the American Revolution Buried in Indiana,” Mrs. Roscoe O’Byrne, page 263 for Samuel Musgrave information.

Research of Jennifer Berryman, Beulah Arlene Musgrove Berryman and Norma Ennis Musgrove Craig.

 

About Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Genealogy research on my own ancestors is a new focus. Posts will include information about those ancestors including the social and economic issues, along with techniques for research.
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2 Responses to Samuel Musgrave and Elizabeth Brand – Revolutionary War Service

  1. Barbara Groce Prichard says:

    My mother, Mary Alvis Williams Groce was related to the Musgroves of the Revolutionary War of 1780 that took part in Laurens County, South Carolina. I found information about a Colonel of that time whose name was Colonel James Williams. My Grandmother almost named my mother Alvis Musgrove and I almost got the name too. There is a Musgrove Mill in and a state park named Battle of Musgrove Mill in South Carolina. Are you familiar with this information? Or is this any part of your genealogy that you may be aware of at this time?

    • Barbara,

      Thanks for contacting me.

      No one has made a connection between the Musgra(o)ve Pennsylvania Quakers and the South Carolina Musgroves, that I’m aware of. I’m co-administrator of the Musgrove Y-DNA project through Family Tree DNA, where we have a few descendants of the Pennsylvania Quakers tested. I’m not aware of any descendants of the Musgrove Mill Musgrove’s being tested. If you know any Musgrove men from South Carolina who would be interested in Y-DNA testing, please ask them to contact me and I will get them the details on testing. FTDNA is having their Father’s Day sale through June 20, so now is a good time to purchase a Y-DNA kit.

      Musgrove Mill looks like a beautiful area, from pictures I’ve seen.

      Warm regards,

      Andrea Musgrove Perisho

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