Musgrove Family Reunion – CD of Family Pictures

Last summer, Aunt Mary Mae brought her collection of family pictures to the Musgrove reunion on Lake Texoma. She and I spent three days going through the collection, which included several unlabeled photographs from the early 1900s. As the oldest daughter of William (Bill) and Eva (Buckmaster) Musgrove, Mary Mae inherited their pictures, including some from Bill’s parents and aunt Odessa (Pennington) Smith.

Pictures were scanned on my Flip-pal scanner, photographed and some originals Mary Mae gave to me to preserve for the next generations. All those photographs are now scanned into my computer and labeled. I’ve just finished making a CD with just over 200 pictures, many from Mary Mae’s collection, but a few others collected from other sources. All pictures are used with the permission of the owners.

While I won’t be able to attend the reunion this year, tomorrow twenty copies of that CD will go into the mail. I’ve already found two mistakes – a name misspelled and a DAR obit inadvertently included. My email address is on each CD to contact me with other errors.

Here’s some pictures from the CD. Could the tall young man in the picture below be William (Bill) Musgrove Jr.-Nora’s brother and Eva’s future husband? And perhaps the boy in the front could be Kenneth Eugene Smith, Nora and Bill’s younger cousin and Dessa’s son? The ages fit. If anyone has these same photographs labeled or photographs of these people at about the same age, please contact me. If this is Eva, it’s the earliest photograph I’ve seen.

Nora Musgrove with musical instrument

 

The photo postcard below was in both the Mary Mae (Musgrove) Dollar collection and the Norma Ennis (Musgrove) Craig collection.

William (Bill) Musgrove Jr baby postcard picture tagged and labeled.

William Walker Musgrove is on the left in the picture below, but the man on the right was unknown, until I looked through the Norma Ennis (Musgrove) Craig’s book. Benjamin Harrison Musgrove, William Walker’s younger brother, is the man on the right.

Musgrove, William Walker and Benjamin Harrison Musgrove front

Several of the other photographs are still unidentified, but not forgotten. I’ll continue to post the rest of them on the blog and research other ways to identify the photographs.

Have fun at the lake!

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

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My Genealogy Cave

Until recently, my computer was in an open loft with bookshelves down the hall and other genealogy stuff in a bedroom closet.

With some reconfiguration, my genealogy stuff is in a room with a door, really adding to efficiency. I added a second computer monitor, very useful when adding information from FTDNA or Gedmatch to the excel spreadsheets containing my DNA chromosome maps.

Computer Desk with Two Monitors

Computer Desk with Two Monitors

Isn’t that a clean desk! As part of my plan to be more efficient, I just have the current project on the desk. When that’s finished, I have plenty more projects on my work tables.

Work Tables

Work Tables

Fortunately, I can keep my back to my work tables. In a project for my ProGen study group I estimate, working 40 hours week, I’ll finish the work on the tables about May 2015. I appreciate the generous relatives who have given me so much information to add to our family tree. Perhaps, the key to a couple of brick walls are hidden on the work table. But back to today’s project – scanning more Musgrove family pictures for the family reunion.

  Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
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Genealogy Education Plan

With traveling and focusing on training to improve my genealogy research and writing skills, I haven’t posted on the blog for awhile.

In April, I finished the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) Genealogy Education Programs (GEP I, II and III). The on-line courses covered DAR applications, plus information useful for other genealogical research. Topics in the twenty-seven lessons included vital records, evaluation of evidence, federal, state, and local records, finding alternative sources, using indirect evidence, creating an analysis, and resolving complex service problems. The last two lessons required submitting an written analysis. I’m now a DAR Genealogy Consultant and feel better prepared to research Revolutionary War patriots for myself and others in our local chapter.

The National Genealogical Society Family History Conference was held in Richmond, Virginia, 7-10 May 2014. I flew in for pre-conference workshops on the probate process and on writing. From Wednesday through Saturday, attendees could choose from dozens of lectures from 8:30 AM to 8:30 PM. When not attending lectures, I was in the Library of Virginia pulling records on Holders and Piggs from Pittsylvania County, perhaps the native home of my Virginia-borne Holder ancestors.

After a week back home, my husband and I flew to Scotland for a tour with a group from our Presbyterian church. Visits to Iona, Stirling Castle of Braveheart fame, Edinburgh, Holy Island-site of the first Viking landing, Rosslyn Chapel-featured in the Da Vinci Code, Cambridge, and several places in and around London were included. During twelve days in Scotland and England, I saw many family surnames-the tomb of Archbishop Musgrave at York Minister, very near where our possible Musgrave ancestors lived; Medcalf in northern England; Knox, Craig, McIntyre and other familiar surnames in Scotland; Archbishop Davidson in southern England and many more. I wish I had ancestors traced back across the pond-maybe a later trip. A wonderful experience, with great scenery and traveling companions.  In the meantime, 500 pictures are awaiting processing.

A week after the overseas trip, I headed to Birmingham, Alabama, for the week-long Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research at Samford University. I was one of twenty five people taking the Writing and Publishing Course taught by Thomas Jones, PhD, one of the most highly regarded genealogy authors and editors in the field and editor of the National Genealogical Society Quarterly (NGSQ). In addition to pre-work, homework was assigned most nights. On Monday night, after attending an optional evening lecture, I finished my homework at midnight. No more evening lectures for me. During our lunch breaks and long afternoon break, I was in the library researching Alabama ancestors, including Isaac Oaks, a Revolutionary War soldier who fought in Virginia, moved to Georgia, then onto Alabama where he is buried. If I can document this lineage, Isaac Oaks will be my first DAR patriot in our Holder line. A highlight of this trip was meeting a Vickers cousin; we connected through my blog post on Daisy McIntire Vickers.

A genealogy education goal is to participate in a study group based on Professional Genealogy: A Manual for Researchers, Writers, Editors, Lecturers and Librarians, edited by Elizabeth Shown Mills, the previous editor of NGSQ. The twenty nine chapters of ProGen, as it is called, cover Ethical Standards, Problem Analysis and Research Plans, Evidence Analysis and more. ProGen study groups work together on-line over about eighteen months covering the 600+ page book. Successful completion of ProGen is sometimes a precursor of genealogy certification. After Richmond, I applied for an upcoming ProGen class. I hoped for a fall class, but knew some people where waitlisted up to a year. While in Scotland, the ProGen coordinator sent me an email about an open spot for a study group starting June 1st. So in the week between the Scotland/England trip and IGHR, I finished my IGHR pre-work and did the reading for my first ProGen study group session held that same week.

Over the next eighteen months, my time will be balanced between genealogy research and training, focusing on the ProGen study group while still allowing time for an on-line NGSQ study group, which reviews one article from that periodical each month. For more details on NGSQ study groups, see Michele Simmons Lewis’s excellent description on her Ancestoring blog.  I’ve followed Michele’s blog and was especially pleased to meet her in the IGHR writing class.

With any luck, I’ll get back on track with weekly blogs, probably not posting 52 ancestors this year, but posting a few more as my research allows.

 Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
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Daisy McIntire Vickers Revisited – Recipes and More #2 of 52 Ancestors Update

After my blog on Daisy McIntire Vickers, several of her descendants responded.  As you may remember, Daisy was raised in Arkansas and a sister to my great-grandfather, Thomas Hendrix McIntire. Daisy had nine sons with eight living to adulthood. She was a young widow, raising the youngest sons on her own.

In her book, Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via mentioned Daisy’s jam cake and fruit salad recipes. Of course, I asked if anyone had the recipes.  My newly found Vickers cousins certainly came through.

Here’s the Jam Cake recipe in Daisy’s own handwriting, dated 1955 on the back.

 

Daisy McIntire Vickers' Christmas Jam Cake Recipe

Daisy McIntire Vickers’ Christmas Jam Cake Recipe

 

Daisy McIntire Vickers' Christmas Jam Cake Recipe back

Daisy McIntire Vickers’ Christmas Jam Cake Recipe back

For those of you who need modern instructions for the cake, here is the recipe updated by one of Daisy’s descendants.

 

Modern version of Daisy's Jam Cake Recipe

Modern version of Daisy’s Jam Cake Recipe

And here is a picture of the cake, made with boisenberry jam.  While the recipe says to put batter into 3 cake pans, the recipe made two layers for the cake below, so you might want to adjust the ingredients if you want a tall three layer cake. Looks pretty yummy doesn’t it.

 

Daisy's Jam Cake made with Boisenberry Jam

Daisy’s Jam Cake made with Boisenberry Jam

 

Grandma Daisy Vickers’ Christmas Fruit Salad

 In equal amounts:

 

  • Apples, peeled, cored and cubed.
  • Oranges, peeled, separated, seeded. Cut each segment in thirds if a large orange – or half if smaller.
  • Grapes (Grandma always used the large seeded ones – we had to cut in half and remove the seeds.) 

 

 16 oz can of cherries (I seem to remember they were red – but I don’t remember if sweetened or unsweetened – I think either would be OK – it would affect amount of sugar needed is all).

 16 oz can of pineapple. Drain juice and reserve.

 Add sugar and reserved pineapple juice.  (Don’t add a big amount of sugar.  Taste in a few hours, add more if needed.) The sugar draws the juice from the other fruit to mingle with the cherry and pineapple juice.

 Cover tightly (a jar or jug with a lid is ideal).  Refrigerate, at least overnight.  When grandma had her assembly line going at our house,  we didn’t have a refrigerator so we made it Christmas Eve and ate it on Christmas Day.  It is good for 2 or 3 days if refrigerated.

When ready to serve, add sliced banana (only in what is to be served at that meal). 

While these were recipes for intended for Christmas, with Easter coming up, how about including one or both of these recipes in your Easter Sunday meal? If you do, put pictures of Facebook and tell us what kind of jelly you used in the cake.

Remember this picture from the earlier blog – Daisy McIntire Vickers. Here is a better copy provided by a Vickers family member.

 

Daisy and William A. Vickers with all their sons-picture used by permission from a Vickers cousin Information on the picture states this is the William & Daisy Vickers family with all of their children, with the other couple Thomas Elihue Vickers and Clare Mae Wade Vickers.  My best guess based on size compared to ages from the 1930 census is starting from the three standing in the back – Wymond, Bordon, Richard. Then Elihue with his wife Clara, Forest, Jennings – standing just behind Ford, Ford, Ralph, Daisy and William. This picture probably taken around 1930.

Daisy and William A. Vickers with all their sons-picture used by permission from a Vickers cousin
Information on the picture states this is the William & Daisy Vickers family with all of their children, with the other couple Thomas Elihue Vickers and Clare Mae Wade Vickers. My best guess based on size compared to ages from the 1930 census is starting from the three standing in the back – Wymond, Bordon, Richard. Then Elihue with his wife Clara, Forest, Jennings – standing just behind Ford, Ford, Ralph, Daisy and William. This picture probably taken around 1930.

The next picture was taken 60 years later, on the occasion of Clara Wade Vickers  Brady’s 80th birthday. Clara is sitting front and center with the corsage surrounded by all her descendants. These are the descendants from just Elihue and Clara. No wonder Daisy’s post has been my most viewed blog post!

 

Clara Wade Vickers Davis 80th Birthday Party

Clara Wade Vickers Brady’s 80th Birthday Party

Below, one final picture of Daisy McIntire Vicker’s in her later years, still with a beautiful smile, high cheek bones and the white, white hair still seen in many of the McIntire family lines.

 

Daisy McIntire Vickers in a rocking chair

Daisy McIntire Vickers in a rocking chair

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

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Unknown Photographs from Bancroft, Daviess County, Missouri #6 in 52 Ancestors

Today’s article features two photographs from the collection of my paternal grandparents, William Musgrove Jr. and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove, now in my collection. There is no writing on the back of these photographs to suggest names for the featured people. The name of the photography studio, W. H. Allen, yields no clues from a computer search.

However, the location of Bancroft, Mo. does give us some clues. Bancroft is in Daviess County, Missouri, where my 2nd great grandparents James T. Pennington and his wife Elnorah Melvina Francis were born in 1857 and 1859, respectively. Their young family was in Daviess County for the 1880 census, but had moved to nearby Harrison County, Missouri by the 1900 census. The 1890 U.S. census was destroyed in a fire, a constant point of grief for genealogists.

While the Pennington and Francis families did scatter into other areas of Missouri, Oklahoma, Kansas and California, some were still in Daviess County in 1900. Daviess County is north and a little east of Kansas City, Missouri on the way to Des Moines, Iowa. Harrison County is on the border of Missouri and Iowa with Daviess County just south of Harrison County.

This style of photograph is called a cabinet card.

“One style of photograph that can often be found in many old family photo collections is the cabinet card. First introduced in 1863 by Windsor & Bridge in London, the cabinet card is a photographic print mounted on card stock. The Cabinet card got its name from its suitability for display in parlors — especially in cabinets — and was a popular medium for family portraits.”[i]

The cream colored cards measure 4 1/4” by 6 ¼” with rounded corners and a thin gold border imprinted around the edge of the photograph. The name of the photography studio, W. H. Allen, and Bancroft, Mo. are written in script with same gold ink. The back of the cards has three chubby cupids flying around a heart pierced by two arrows. Ms. Powell, on her website, indicates cabinet cards with rounded corners and a thin gold border were popular from 1889-1896. Though, if a photographer had those cards in inventory, they could be used later.

Cabinet Card photo abt 1889-1896

As I look at the photograph of the two young girls, I see my own pug nose on the girl on the right, the one with the high-necked dress. I wonder if this could be my great-grandmother Mary Elizabeth Pennington Musgrove. In 1896, she would have been 17 years old and her younger sister, Alice Cynthia, would have 15. We have other pictures of these women when they are older, but it’s hard to tell. Those of you that have those pictures, or knew the women, what do you think – could these be Mary Elizabeth and Alice Cynthia Pennington?

Cabinet Card Bancroft Mo Two young couples 001

The picture of the two young couples is more difficult, though it does seem like the young women on the left in both pictures share at least a family resemblance, with the woman in the couples picture looking a little older. What do you think?

If you have any clues to the identity of these people, please let me know.



[i] Powell, Kimberly, Cabinet Cards, (http://genealogy.about.com/od/photo_dating/p/cabinet_card.htm :accessed  20 Feb 2014).

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

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Samuel Musgrave – Revolutionary War Soldier and “Indian Spy” #5 in 52 Ancestors

Musgrave

Picture given to Norma Ennis Craig Musgrove by a relative stating the subject was Samuel Musgrave. Does anyone have proof of this?Samue

Samuel Musgrave (Musgrove) was a Revolutionary War soldier who fought under General Washington in the Battle of Brandywine. The battle between the Americans and the British army under General Howe took place on September 11, 1777 near Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. The British won the battle, eventually capturing Philadelphia on September 26 and occupying that city until June 1778.[1]

Based on the research of Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via and others, along with my research, I was accepted into the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) with Jacob Eoff as my ancestor. Follow these links to see earlier posts on the Eoffs and Palatine Germans.

Samuel Musgrove was just approved by the DAR as a supplemental patriot for me. Norma Ennis Craig Musgrove did the research linking her grandfather William Tate Musgrave (Musgrove) to Samuel. Norma was a DAR member herself.

You’ve probably noticed the two different spellings of Samuel’s and William Tate’s last name. William Tate used the spelling Musgrave in his early days, then Musgrove later in life. One family genealogist speculated the spelling was changed to differentiate the child from his first wife from the children by his second wife. Pure speculation, but the timing is about right. Samuel Musgrave’s Quaker parents and grandparents generally used Musgrave as did Samuel’s children. The DAR database is about the only place I’ve seen Samuel’s name spelling Musgrove.

Samuel was the fourth generation of his line in the United States.[2] He was born in Chester County, Pennsylvania in 1747 and died on 2 Sept 1833 in Warrick County, Indiana at 87 years of age.[3] He married Elizabeth Brand in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania on 10 Sept 1767.[4] She was born in Pennsylvania about 1750 and died about 1843 in Warrick County, Indiana.[5]

Samuel enlisted in July 1776 in Cannonkackick Settlement, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania and served three months.[6] In 1782, he served twelve more months as an “Indian Spy” under Lt. Robert Ritchie in Pennsylvania Troops.[7] Much of this information is in Samuel’s Proof Pension Claim W.9211.[8] On 30 Dec 1834, Elizabeth filed for a widow’s pension.[9]

Many of the Native Americans had treaties with the British, whom they supported during the war.[10]An Indian Spy patrolled the trails along the frontier warning the settlers of impending attacks.[11] Generally the spys or scouts were divided into pairs, with each pair assigned a section of the frontier were war paths were watched.[12] The spys were not an attack force, but warned the settlers so they could prepare for defense. [13] The men carried their supplies on their backs, slept on the ground and foraged for food living off deer and bear meat.[14] This was a very different life from Samuel’s Quaker relatives who stayed in settled areas, especially considering the pacifist Quaker beliefs. Follow these links to see previous blogs on Samuel Musgrave and Moses Musgrave.

DAR Logo

DAR Logo

If you are a woman over the age of 18 years and descended from either my McIntire/Eoff line or  Musgrave line, you are eligible for DAR membership. If you are interested, contact me for my DAR number and contact your local DAR chapter for more details.[15] Since the research has been done on those lines, you’ll need to collect fewer documents to prove your lineage. For the men, the same information can be used to apply for membership in the Sons of the American Revolution.



[1] Wikipedia, Battle of Brandywine, (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Brandywine : accessed 27 Feb 2014.)

[2] Musgrove, Duane and Marie Wilson, A History of the Moses Musgrave Family, Quakers, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Kansas and Further West (Indiana, Evansville Bindery, Inc, 1998), p 11.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Ibid.

[6] Ibid.

[7] Ibid.

[8] Ibid.

[9] Ibid.

[10] Zeigler, Fred, Cook’s Old Mill, ( http://www.cooksoldmill.com/text/article-jcook.html : accessed 27 Feb 2014). Clinch Scouts, (http://vagenweb.org/lee/ClinchScoutsMA.html : accessed 27 Feb 2014).

[11] Ibid.

[12] Ibid.

[13] Ibid

[14] Ibid.

[15] National Society Daughters of the American Revolution, (http://www.dar.org/default.cfm : accessed 27 Feb 2014).

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

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Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove – 3rd of 52 ancestors

William (Bill) Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove

William (Bill) Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove

Eva Evelyna Buckmaster was born less than a year after statehood, the first child of Andrew Jackson Buckmaster and Dovey Alpine Piearcy Buckmaster, probably near Wynnewood, Garvin County, Oklahoma.[1] The new state was not yet collecting birth records and only later family records have been found recording her birth on May 14, 1908.[2] Her middle name has been spelled Evelina, Evelyna and even the rather endearing Everleaner, but most records use Evelyna.

By 1910, the Andrew J. Buckmaster family was renting just outside of Sasakwa, in Seminole County, next door to Andrew’s mother, Mahala Hopkins Buckmaster.[3] Living with Mahala was her youngest son, Richard Lafayette, called Babe.[4]Both families were farming on their rented land.[5] The late Charles Wilson Buckmaster, the father of Andrew Jackson and Richard Lafayette, was a Civil War veteran who served with the Union Army, not a fact discussed since most Oklahoma residents supported the Southern effort.[6]

We don’t know much about those early years for Eva, but by 1917, Andrew Jackson Buckmaster family was living in Calvin, Hughes County, where he registered for the World War I draft.[7] The family hasn’t been found in the 1920 census records, but by this time Eva had two brothers and one sister: Goldie born in 1910, Seth Andrew born in 1911 and Vernon Alton born in 1916.[8] Two more little girls were added to the family with Violet Alpine born in 1921 and Sylvia in 1924.[9] There are some gaps in the births of the children, but no record of any other births or pregnancies.

Sometime in 1928, Dovey died, perhaps from scarlet fever or perhaps from double pneumonia, near Holdenville in Hughes County.[10] No records of her death have been found, neither at the state or county level.[11] From family stories, a wooden marker was near her gravesite.[12] Eva and some of her daughters went back to Hughes County many years later but were not able to locate the cemetery.[13]

Andrew Jackson Buckmaster did not remarry after Dovey’s death, but moved his family in with his eighty-five year old mother who owned her land by now.[14] Andrew Jackson farmed the land, with Seth helping and also doing odd jobs.[15] Eva’s younger sister, Goldie married Malone Wilson in July 1929.[16] Then, on November 2, 1929, Eva married William Musgrove in Oklahoma City with Malone Willson and Golda Willson as their witnesses.[17] When they married, Eva was twenty-one years old and Bill was twenty.[18] As far as an education, both had completed the seventh grade.[19]

William Musgrove’s parents were William Walker Musgrove and Mary Elizabeth Pennington Musgrove.[20] While no birth records have been found for William Musgrove, he was probably born in Labette County, Kansas.[21]  In the days before data bases and with limited education, name spellings and variations of names were not so critical. In the first records of William Musgrove, he was listed as William Jr., then later Bill Jr.[22], [23]  In family pictures, he was listed as Bill June or June. However, as an adult he was always called Bill. Most likely, his given name was William Walker Musgrove, Jr (after his father) and he called June (a variation of Junior) until he had children of his own, when his nickname changed to Bill. Some nicknames stuck for life; for example, Richard Lafayette Buckmaster had his nickname of Babe on his gravestone.[24] That nickname is the only name my family ever knew for their Uncle Babe.[25]

After Eva and Bill married, they lived for at least a while with Bill’s family in Council Grove, Oklahoma.[26] For the 1930 census, Bill is listed as W. M. Musgrove, a farmer, renting land as the head of household.[27] In the same family is listed Eva, wife, along with W. W., father, with his trade listed as restaurant, Mary, mother, and younger siblings – Nora M., James H. and Gracie.[28] (See an earlier posting for more information on  Gracie.) The family supported themselves with a booth at a market – selling produce they had raised, along with squabs, young domesticated pigeons, meat they had butchered and ice they had cut from the river.[29] Times were tough in Oklahoma during the depression. In about 1934, the family sold out and bought land in Marshall County, near the Red River in southern Oklahoma.[30] Two homes were built – one for the William Walker Sr. family and one for Bill and Eva’s growing family, with a water well dug near William Walker’s house.[31]

Model T Pickup Truck - Just like the one the family had in the 1930s. Picture taken at Edison Ford Museum in Fort Myers, Florida with William Musgrove, oldest son of the couple.

Model T Pickup Truck – Just like the one the family had in the 1930s. Picture taken at Edison Ford Museum in Fort Myers, Florida with William Musgrove, oldest son of the couple.

The family made the one hundred thirty mile move with a couple of trips in a Model T Ford pickup truck.[32] After the move, the pickup truck was parked and rusted away.[33] Gasoline was just too expensive during those hard times.[34] Their milk cow could not make the trip and was sold to the government for $10.[35] The federal agents shot her in the head and just left her there; no one was allowed to keep the meat.[36] Part of some government program that made no sense to anyone.

By 1935, Eva had borne four children – twins at the first pregnancy, with the baby girl born dead and  buried in a gallon fruit jar in the back yard.[37] So three children, the first born son and two younger daughters girls made the move on the Model T Ford, along with the rest of the family.[38]

Part of an old foundation near the Musgrove homes built in the 1930s - Powell, Marshall County, OK. The area is so overgrown it was hard to pinpoint the location of the houses.

Part of an old foundation near the Musgrove homes built in the 1930s – Powell, Marshall County, OK. The area is so overgrown it was hard to pinpoint the location of the houses.

Eva was probably happy to have her own home. Living with her mother-in-law may not have been that pleasant with Mary Pennington Musgrove feeling that her son had married down.[39] We don’t know why Mary Pennington Musgrove felt that way, perhaps because of Eva’s rumored Indian blood. Eva never said much about her Indian heritage, just saying the family was Black Dutch.[40] Eva’s children remember their daddy being invited up to dinner with their grandparents, but Eva and the children were never invited.[41] We do know both women shared the same religious convictions – both very devoted to the Holiness Church with Eva contributing money to Oral Roberts and Oral Roberts University much of her life.[42]

Christmas Greetings from the Holy Land from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove's collection, probably a memento from a donation to Oral  Roberts University, Musgrove files, in the collection of Andrea Musgrove Perisho, (private address), 2014.

Christmas Greetings from the Holy Land from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove’s collection, probably a memento from a donation to Oral Roberts University, Musgrove files, in the collection of Andrea Musgrove Perisho, (private address), 2014.

Jersey Cow purchased with insurance money.

Jersey Cow purchased with insurance money.

With the construction of Lake Texoma, the family had to sell their land to the Corp of Engineers.[43] After a big search in Texas and Oklahoma, which involved a car wreck and insurance money used to buy a Jersey milk cow, land was found in nearby Bryan County.[44] The rich milk from that Jersey cow may have saved the life of one of Eva and Bill’s young daughter’s during an extended illness.[45]

The two Musgrove families moved to farms several miles apart, but before the move, Bill was injured while working on construction of the Lake Texoma dam.[46] He was on crutches quite a while and had on-going health problems including possible tuberculosis.[47]

Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove on an Easter Sunday hunting eggs with her great-grandchildren.

Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove on an Easter Sunday hunting eggs with her great-grandchildren.

Grandma Musgrove had a total of twelve children with ten still living today.[48] She always had a big garden, canning and later freezing enough food to last her family until the next harvest.[49] She was one who took care of the milk cow and barn as well, even after she came down with sugar diabetes sometime after her last child was born when she was forty-six years old.[50] She was a hard worker, a religious woman and a kind woman. Her children were the focus of her life; she worked hard to take care of them. Eva appreciated a good laugh and was very proud of and much loved by her extended family. Even up into her eighties, Eva still had long dark hair that she worn in a braid and wrapped around her head, still retaining the olive skin and cheekbones of her mother Dovey Alpine Piearcy Buckmaster.

Thirteen months after Bill died, Eva died on August 18, 1992 at the hospital in Denison, Grayson County, Texas.[51] The immediate cause of death was respiratory failure due to pulmonary edema.[52] At the time of her death, Eva left behind thirty-six grandchildren and twenty-eight great-grandchildren.[53] Her oldest grandsons were her pall bearers and there wasn’t a dry eye in the church for this family matriarch.[54] Eva Evelyna Buckmaster Musgrove is buried at Albany Cemetery, Albany, Bryan County, Oklahoma.[55]

Tombstone of William Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove

Tombstone of William Musgrove and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove



[1] Ibid.

[2] Ibid.

[3] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Miller Township, enumeration district (ED) 189, p. 80XX (handwritten and cut off, page before is 8015 and page after is 8089), sheet 9A (handwritten, scratched out, rewritten), dwelling 52, family 52, Andrew J. Buckmaster; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T624,  roll 1274.

[4] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 51, fam. 51, Mahala Buckmaster.  Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 29 Jan 2014), memorial page for Richard Lafayette “Babe” Buckmaster  (1887-1960), Find A Grave Memorial # 93287917, citing Rosedale Cemetery, Ada, Pontotoc County, Oklahoma.

[5] 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 52, fam. 52, Andrew J. Buckmaster and 1910 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 80XX, dwell. 51, fam. 51, Mahala Buckmaster.

[6] Compiled service record, Charles Buckmaster, Pvt., Co. A, 14 Iowa Inf.; Carded Records, Volunteer Organizations, Civil War; Records of the Adjutant General’s Office, 1780s-1917, Record Group 94; National Archives, Washington, D.C.

[7]United States World War 1 Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014), card for Andrew Jackson Buckmaster, serial no. 35-2-8-C  (stamped at top of back of card), Local Draft Board, Holdenville, Hughes County, Oklahoma; citing NARA microfilm publication M1509.

[8] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014),  “Piearcy, Powell, Buckmaster, Thomas, Beaman/Bauermeister and  Cook/Davis Family ” entries for Andrew Jackson Buckmaster (1887-1960); submitted by [private user names].

[9] Ibid.

[10] Ibid. Family stories passed down from Eva Buckmaster Musgrove.

[11] Request to Oklahoma Department of Health for death certificate returned 2 Jan 2013.  Visit to the Holdenville Historical Society, Hughes County, Oklahoma indicated no county death certificates would have been collected at that time.

[12] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013; audiotapes privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2014.

[13] Ibid.

[14] 1930 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, population schedule,  Sasakwa Town, enumeration district (ED) 67-25, p. 8601 (handwritten), sheet 2B (number handwritten, letter stamped), dwelling 40, family 42, Mahaley Buckmaster; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T626,  roll 1931.

[15] 1930 U.S. census, Seminole County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., p. 8601, dwelling 40, family 42, Mahaley Buckmaster.

[16] Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, Marriage Index, 1889-1951, index, Oklahoma Historical Society (http://www.okhistory.org/research/marriagerec :accessed 29 Jan 2014), entry for Wilson Malone-Golda Buckmaster, 16 July 1929; citing Oklahoma County Marriage records 1889-1951, Book 65, p391.

[17] Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, marriage certificate with no certificate number (2 Nov 1929), Musgrove-Buckmaster; Musgrove Family Papers, privately held by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, [address for private use,] 2012.

[18] Calculation based on their birth dates and date of marriage.

[19] 1940 U.S. census, Marshall County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Lebanon, Holford Township, enumeration district (ED) 48-3,  no page number, sheet 11B (number handwritten and letter stamped), household 192, William  Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T627,  roll 3311.

[20] Texas death certificate no. 076806 (1991), William Junior Musgrove.

[21] 1910 U.S. census, Labette County, Kansas, population schedule, Oswego Township, enumeration district (ED) 143, p. 6322 (handwritten), sheet 8B (number handwritten and letter stamped), dwelling 104, family 105, William Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T624,  roll 443.

[22] 1910 U.S. census, Labette County, Kansas, pop. sch., p. 6322, dwelling 104, family 105, William Musgrove.

[23] 1920 U.S. census, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Pottawatomie Township, enumeration district (ED) 166, no page number, sheet 7B (number handwritten and letter stamped), visited no. 148, William W. Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T625,  roll 1473.

[24] Find A Grave, memorial page for Richard Lafayette “Babe” Buckmaster  (1887-1960), Find A Grave Memorial # 93287917.

[25] William Andrew Musgrove [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 12 July 2013; audiotapes and transcripts privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2014.

[26] 1930 U.S. census, Oklahoma County, Oklahoma, population schedule, Council Grove, enumeration district (ED) 55a, p. 5646 (handwritten), sheet 15B (number handwritten and letter stamped), dwelling 331, family 334, W. M. Musgrove ; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 29 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T626,  roll 1917.

[27] Ibid.

[28] Ibid.

[29] William Andrew Musgrove [address for private use], recorded interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002; audiotapes and transcripts privately held by Perisho, [address for private use,] Florida, 2010.

[30] 1940 U.S. census, Marshall County, Oklahoma, pop. sch., sheet 11B, household 192, William  Musgrove.

[31] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[32] Ibid.

[33] Ibid.

[34] Ibid.

[35] Ibid.

[36] Ibid.

[37] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[38] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[39] Ibid.

[40] Ibid.

[41] Ibid.

[42] Ibid.

[43] Ibid.

[44] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[45] Ibid.

[46] William Andrew Musgrove, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 28 Nov 2002.

[47] Mary Mae Musgrove Dollar, interview by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, 11 July 2013.

[48] Ibid.

[49] Ibid.

[50] Ibid.

[51] Texas death certificate no. 142-92-080426 (1992), Eva Evelyna Musgrove.

[52] Ibid.

[53] “Eva Musgrove,” undated obituary, probably from the Durant Daily Democrat, Durant, Oklahoma; Musgrove Family Papers, privately held by Andrea Musgrove Perisho, [address for private use,] 1992. Laminated and distributed to family members after the funeral.

[54] Ibid.

[55] Texas death certificate no. 142-92-080426 (1992), Eva Evelyna Musgrove.

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

Posted in Buckmaster, Musgrove | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Unknown Ancestors – Pictures from the Musgrove collection #4 of 52 Ancestors

Copyright 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Copyright 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Last summer, a Musgrove aunt gave me several pictures collected by my paternal grandparents,  William Musgrove Jr and Eva Buckmaster Musgrove. Most of these photographs had been removed from photo albums and had no other identification. Perhaps, someday a Musgrove, Buckmaster, Pennington, Medcalf or Hopkins cousin will find this blog and identify these ancestors or family friends. Family members with all these surnames lived in or near Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma.

Copyright 2014 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Copyright 2014 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

The three photographs in today’s post were all taken by Klepfer Studio in McLoud, Oklahoma. From what I’ve learned today about early photography, these were probably all taken sometime shortly after 1900. A call to the McLoud library indicated no city directories are available to decide when Klepfer Studio was in business. I did find a Klepfer photographer in the Oklahoma City area and sent a message through Facebook, just in case the McLoud Studio owner was related. Using Google images search, no matches for these images showed up. Articles and books recommend looking at clothing/hairstyles to decide a range of years the pictures could be taken. I’m thinking that might work better in a metropolitan area. Any suggestions on how to identify these old photographs would be appreciated.

Copyright 2014 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

Copyright 2014 by Andrea Musgrove Perisho

We originally thought the picture of the baby in the wicker baby carriage might be my grandfather, William Musgrove Jr., but after seeing a labeled picture of my grandfather in a different gown, this is probably a different baby.

The pictures are out of their ziplock bag and into an acid free archival quality Hollinger Metal Edge album, safely stored for future generations, if we just knew who these people were. I’ll be posting more of these photos as I get a chance, next up with be six cabinet cards from Kansas, Nebraska and Missouri – perhaps Francis or Webster kin.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
Posted in Buckmaster, Hopkins, Musgrove, Pennington | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Great Week in Genealogy and It’s Only Thursday

First, I registered for Course 4: Writing and Publishing for Genealogists taught by Tom Jones, one of the best genealogy writers and editors. The week-long course is taught at Samford University’s Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research (IGHR) in Birmingham, Alabama. The class fills up very quickly, with on-line registration opening at 12 noon on Tuesday. I was on-line as the class opened up at 11:58 am, according my computer clock. After finishing registration for the class I realized, in my excitement, I’d forgotten to sign up for on-campus room and board for the week. Logging back in at 12:08, Dr. Jones’ class was already full!

Second, success with DNA testing. I administer 10 DNA kits for family members on FTDNA, along with my additional testing on 23andMe and ancestry. I’ve sent one wave of invitations to all my 973 23andMe matches and added over 200 cousins to my chromosome maps, without finding any close relatives. That all changed this week, when I send out a second wave of invitations to 65 new relatives. One person responded almost immediately. It didn’t take us long to find we are related through our Buckmaster line, with my dad remembering his grand father. My new cousin and I share Charles Wilson Buckmaster and Mahala Hopkins as our most recent common ancestors, motivation for me to analyze Charles’ 500+ pages of Civil War pension file records sitting in two 3″ ring binders on my shelf.

Third – new record on my blog. After the post on Daisy McIntire Vickers, my blog site has had over 100 views/day for the past two days, a record for my blog, with nice comments from some of her grandchildren and great-grandchildren, but I’m still looking for the jam cake and fruit salad recipes. I’d love to share those, if anyone has her recipes.

Altogether a great week in genealogy and it’s only Thursday.

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho
Posted in Buckmaster, Civil War, DNA, Hopkins | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

DAISY MCINTIRE VICKERS 1888-1965 #2 of 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Daisy McIntire, the pretty blond youngest daughter of John A. McIntire and Mary Jane Elliott, was born in the summer of 1888 in Bickles Cove, Stone County, Arkansas.[1],[2] Daisy was eleventh of thirteen children with two younger brothers.[3] Hendrix, my great-grandfather, was four years older than Daisy.[4]

John, a stone mason with his fine handwork still apparent in the partly standing log cabin on their old home place, died of a ruptured appendix when Daisy was just six years old.[5],[6] Some family members call him John Alfonso though the existing records only show his middle initial as an A.[7]  Mary Jane stayed in Stone County raising the children until she moved to Oklahoma sometime before 1920.[8]

After reading my blog about a visit to Stone County, Arkansas, a Vickers cousin shared several photographs, which inspired this article.[9] The photographs in this blog can also be found in Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via’s book on pages 249 and 251.[10] Pauline still has some of her books available. If you are interested in purchasing her hardback book with almost 600 pages, you can contact Pauline at the addresses below.[11]

Pauline’s book and the census records tell us a lot about Daisy, but if you have any family stories or more records to add to her story or corrections to this story, let me know. I copyright my blog postings, but family members may use this information and pictures for their own personal use.

Stone County was created April 21, 1873, from parts of Izard, Independence, Searcy and Van Buren counties and was named for the rock formations of the Ozark Mountains.[12] The county seat is Mountain View.[13] Virtually unoccupied by white settlers in the first decades of the nineteenth century, present-day Stone County was an Indian reservation until 1828.[14] Stone County’s initial white settlements began soon after that in the early 1830s.[15] The county was devastated during the Civil War, not from battles, but from lawless bushwhackers and guerillas who terrorized the border lands of Arkansas and Missouri with their plundering, theft, destruction of property and even murder.[16]After the Civil War, development, especially along the White River, increased.[17] Agriculture was important in the area, though you can imagine with the name of Stone County, farming was not a lucrative occupation, but with each family producing enough for their own needs.[18]  The economic base of today’s Stone County is poultry, livestock, wood products, and light manufacturing along with popular tourist destinations such as the Ozark National Forest, Blanchard Spring Caverns and the Ozark Folk Center.[19]

1900 U.S. Census, Blue Mountain Township, Stone County, Arkansas, family 126.[20]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

Status

McIntire, Mary J

Head

F

W

47

Wd

McIntire,       Julia

Dau

F

W

20

S

McIntire,       Madona

Dau

F

W

17

S

McIntire,       Cleveland

Son

M

W

15

S

McIntire,       Hendrix

Son

M

W

19

S

McIntire,        Daisy

Dau

F

W

11

S

McIntire,        Clinton

Son

M

W

10

S

McIntire,        Josh

Son

M

W

5

S

Additional information on the census indicates Mary J. McIntire was renting land, with her occupation listed as farmer.[21] The census stated Mary J. had been married twenty two years, was the mother of thirteen children with twelve of the children still living.[22]

The occupation of the twins, Cleveland and Hendrix, was farm laborer.[23] Mary J., Julia and Madona could read and write, but the census taker indicated none of the other children could. [24]  All spoke English.[25] It appears none of the children had attended school in the past year.[26] From nearby census pages, about one third to one half of the school age children had attended two or three months of school.[27]

The census records also indicate all the children were born in Arkansas, as was Mary J. McIntire.[28] Her parents and the father of the children were born in Tennessee.[29]

The twins, Cleveland (nickname – Cleve) and Hendrix (nickname – Hen), were listed in the index with Cleve as age 15 and Hen as age 19.[30] On the digital image of the census, the age of both boys was listed as 15, with that crossed out and re-entered as 14.[31] Then, on the index, Cleve was transcribed as 15 and Hen as 19.[32] The twins were born on 29 Sept 1884. [33] So Cleve and Hen were 15 and would turn 16 in Sept. Also, the Madona listed in the index is actually Mandana, always called Dane. The transcription errors in this index is the reason genealogists always search for the original record and do not trust a transcription/index.

At the time of the 1900 census, Clifton R. McIntire, just older than Daisy, was not counted with the family but was listed as a boarder with another Blue Mountain Township resident James Simpson, age 74, and his wife Rachel Simpson.[34] Clifton was 13. 

Daisy McIntire

Daisy McIntire

When she was fifteen, Daisy married William Alfonso Vickers, a widower seventeen years older.[35] A copy of their marriage record is in the Pierce Via book, along with Pauline’s comments about the marriage license stating Daisy was 17, when she was really only 15.[36]In later years, Daisy said she married at age 15, which perfectly matches the calculation using her birth date and marriage date.[37] William had one daughter Nettie, eight years old.[38], [39] William’s first wife was Lucy Belle McIntire, a granddaughter of John McIntire and Lydia McCollum, who were great grandparents to Daisy, so the two wives of William Alfonso Vickers were first cousins, once removed.[40] In this culture, it seems a widower with children naturally looked to his wife’s family for a second wife, perhaps to make sure the children are well treated. Daisy went on to raise Nettie and have nine handsome sons of her own, eight who lived to adulthood.[41]

U.S. censuses are collected every 10 years and can tell us a lot of information. While many of the same basic facts are gathered at each census, some different facts are also collected. Here’s what we can tell about the Vickers family from 1910-1940 census records.

1910 U.S. Census, Cove, Stone County, Arkansas, family 9.[42]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

Status

Married yrs

Born In

Father born in

Mother born in

Vickers, William

Head

M

W

38

M2

6

TN

TN

TN

Vickers, Daisy

Wife

F

W

21

M1

6

AR

AR

AR

Vickers, Nettie

Dau

F

W

14

S

AR

TN

AR

 Vickers, Elihue

Son

M

W

2

S

AR

TN

AR

Vickers, No Name

Son

M

W

10/12

S

AR

TN

AR

Gracie, M J

Mother

F

W

58

Wd

TN

TN

TN

In the 1910 census, the Vickers family was renting land just three dwellings from Mary J. McIntire, who now owns her land.[43] Evidently, the township name was changed from Blue Mountain to Cove with Mary Jane McIntire still in the same place since the 1900 census. From the 1910 census, Daisy had two children who are both still living. M. J. Gracie, mother of William Vickers and enumerated with the William Vickers family, indicates she had six children with only one still living.[44] Other Ancestry.com records show William’s mother was Mary Jane Berryhill Vickers Gracy(ie), born about 1854 in Tennessee and died in 1910 sometime after the census was taken that year.[45] Most of these Ancestry.com records show William Vickers’ father was Robert Lafayette Vickers born about 1852, with no death information. [46]

1920 U.S. Census, Cove, Stone County, Arkansas, dwelling #6.[47]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

Attended school

Can read

Can Write

Vickers, W. A.

Head

M

W

49

Y

Y

Vickers, Daisy

Wife

F

W

32

Y

Y

Vickers, Elihue

Son

M

W

12

Y

Y

Y

Vickers, Borden

Son

M

W

10

Y

Y

Y

Vickers, Richard

Son

M

W

8

Y

Vickers, Wymond

Son

M

W

4 7/8

Vickers, Jennings

Son

M

W

1 1/12

By 1920, the Vickers family is still renting in the Cove area, with the Cleveland McIntire family listed three families down on the same census page.[48] Daisy and Cleve’s mother, Mary Jane McIntire has moved to Cleveland, Oklahoma to live with son, Jasper.[49] Nettie Vickers had left the family home and married Silas Albright.[50] Find-A-Grave.com records show Nettie was born in 1895 and died in 1973.[51] Also, Ancestry.com family trees show Odis Vickers was born in 1913, two years after Richard.[52] Find-a-Grave shows a tombstone picture for Odis, indicating he was born on March 1, 1913 and died in Nov 1914, so Odis wouldn’t appear in any census records.[53] I don’t find any notes on the cause of death. From the 1920, 1930 and 1940 censuses, the state the family members was born in, along with the state their parents was born in, is consistent with the 1910 census.  

1930 U.S. Census, Wallace, Stone County, Arkansas, dwelling #60.[54]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

Attended school

Can read/ write

Occupation

Vickers, W. A.

Head

M

W

58

N

Y

General farming

Vickers, Daisy

Wife

F

W

44

N

Y

Vickers, Richard

Son

M

W

19

N

Y

Work on father’s farm

 Vickers, Wyman

Son

M

W

14

Y

Y

Vickers, Jennings

Son

M

W

11

Y

Y

Vickers, Forest

Son

M

W

9

Y

Vickers, Ford

Son

M

W

7

Y

Vickers, Ralph

Son

M

W

4

N

1930 U.S. Census, Wallace, Stone County, Arkansas, dwelling #61.[55]

Vickers, Elihue

Head

M

W

20

N

Y

General farming

Vickers, Clara

Wife

F

W

18

N

Y

 1930 finds these two Vickers households each renting and enumerated next to each other in the community of Wallace. Elihue’s census record carries a note in the margin – “Did not operate farm last year.”[56]A new question for the 1930 census is the age of the person at marriage – W. A. Vickers listed his age at what was probably his first marriage as 22, Daisy listed her age at marriage as 20, Elihue is listed 20 and Clara is listed as 16.[57],[58][Since we know from previous analysis Daisy married at 15, perhaps she was trying to set an example for her sons to wait a bit before marriage.] A new question for the 1930 census asked if the household had a radio set. Neither Vickers’ household had one at the time of the census.

William And Daisy Vickers family all of their children the other couple is Thomas Elihue Vickers and Clara Mae Wade

 

Daisy and William A. Vickers with their sons-picture used by permission from a Vickers cousin

Information on the picture states this is the William & Daisy Vickers family with all of their children, with the other couple Thomas Elihue Vickers and Clare Mae Wade Vickers.  My best guess based on size compared to ages from the 1930 census is starting from the three standing in the back – Wymond, Bordon, Richard. Then Elihue with his wife Clara, Forest, Jennings – standing just behind Ford, Ford, Ralph, Daisy and William. This picture probably taken around 1930.

Ancestry.com family trees indicate William Alfonzo Vickers died in Poinsett County, AR. on 13 Mar 1938.[59] I did not  find his records in the Arkansas Death Indexes, nor any records the family lived in Poinsett County, with my brief search. William and Daisy have a grave marker together at York Cemetery, Marcella, Stone County, AR, with the tombstone indicating both their birth and death dates.[60]

The family might have moved to Poinsett County in eastern Arkansas before William’s death or he might have been working alone there. We do know that Daisy was the widowed head of household renting in nearby Mississippi County, AR for the 1940 census, which stated the family had lived in Mississippi County on 01 April  1935.[61]

Poinsett was one of the Arkansas counties devastated by the Civil War, right on the border of Missouri, Arkansas and Tennessee.[62] The county didn’t start a financial recovery until the railroads came in the 1880s, giving farmers a way to ship their cotton, farm animals and timber to new markets.[63]Many of the small railroad towns boomed, but, still, the county was mostly poor sharecroppers and tenant farmers.[64] Poinsett County was the hardest hit county by the Great Mississippi Flood of 1927, flooding thousands of fields and destroying many homes throughout the county.[65] Probably not really pertinent to this family analysis, but, never-the-less interesting, the Southern Tenant Farmers Union was founded in the area in the years after the flood.[66] The organization was an interracial union to improve the pay and working conditions of poor sharecroppers.[67]

Mississippi County, Arkansas was named for the Mississippi River which makes up the eastern border of the county.[68] This county has the unusual arrangement of two county seats – one in Blytheville in the north and one in Osceola in the south.[69]This county also has the unfortunate distinction of being part of the First Congressional District in Arkansas which is the poorest Congressional District in the United States.[70] Mississippi County was known for its rich delta farmland with easy transportation access to the Mississippi River and is known these days as a great area of duck hunting and fishing for northwest Arkansas and southeast Missouri ‘Bootheel’ residents.[71]  

1940 U.S. Census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, dwelling #559.[72]

Name

Relationship to head of household

Gender

Race

Age

# Yrs of School

Vickers, Daisy

Head

F

W

51

5

Vickers, Forest

Son

M

W

19

8

Vickers, Ford

Son

M

W

17

4

Vickers, Ralph

Son

M

W

15

4

1940 U.S. Census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, dwelling #557.[73]

Vickers, Wymon

Head

M

W

24

5

Vickers, Nellie

Wife

F

W

23

1

Vickers, Orace

Son

M

W

4

0

Vickers, Horace

Son

M

W

4

0

Vickers, Betty Sue

Dau

F

W

4/12

0

The 1940 census asked where the family was living in 1935. The Daisy Vickers family was living in Rural, Mississippi Co., AR on 01 Apr 1935.[74] The Wymon Vickers family was living in Rural, Stone Co., AR on 01 Apr 1935.[75] Wymon Vickers is the name of the second son of Daisy and William Vickers, as indicated in earlier census records and Pauline Via’s book. With the Wymon Vickers family living two houses from Daisy Vickers in the 1940 census, a comparison of the age of this Wymon Vickers in previous censuses and that he was living previously in Stone County near other relatives, this Wymon Vickers was very likely the son of Daisy Vickers and had, perhaps, moved close to his mother and youngest brothers to help out after the death of his father.

For last remarks on Daisy, Pauline Via writes a beautiful summary of her life. In describing Daisy’s appearance and her life, Pauline could be describing many of our McIntire relatives.

Daisy was a tall woman, 5’ 9 1/2” and, in later years, had the most beautiful snow white hair. She was a widow for almost 28 years, but made a home for her young sons until they married and moved away from her house. She lived with her youngest son Ralph, for several years after his marriage, then alone in a small house in the back yard of her son Forrest in Lepanto, Arkansas. She spent her last years at the home of her son Richard, suffering from complications of high blood pressure, heart problems and diabetes.

Her fruit salad and jam cake were a tradition for Christmas dinner. Today, when you visit various households of granddaughters, you may find these (especially the fruit salad) as part of the Christmas dinner. As a testimony of her character, her daughters-in-law speak of her with respect and affection.”[76]

If anyone has more to add to Daisy’s story or the recipes for that jam cake or fruit salad, please let me know.

____________

[1] 1900 U.S. Census, Stone County, Arkansas, population schedule, Blue Mountain Township, enumeration district (ED) 129, p. 142A (stamped), sheet 8, dwelling 126, family 126, Mary J. McIntire; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 17 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T623,  roll 77.

[2] Pauline Mitchell Pierce [Via], The McIntires and the Elliotts of Bickle’s Cove, Stone County, Arkansas and the Descendants of John McIntire of Maury County, Tennessee, (Palestine, Texas: Pauline Mitchell Pierce [Via], 17557 Hwy 14, Mountain View, AR 72560, 1993), p 84.

[3] Ibid.

[4] Ibid.

[5] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 141.

[6] Verbal communication with Pauline Mitchell Pierce Via, June 2013.

[7] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 141.

[8] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 141.

[9] Andrea Musgrove Perisho, “Photo Tour of Stone County, Arkansas,” After Toil Comes Rest, 03 July 2013,            (http://andreamusgroveperisho.com/?p=353 : accessed 13 Oct 2013).

[10] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 249 & 251.

[11] Pauline Mitchell Piearcy Via, email address –  avia@mvtel.net, mailing address – 17557 Hwy 14, Mountain View, AR 72560.

[12] http://local.arkansas.gov/ : accessed 12 Oct 2013.

[13] Ibid.

[14] Don Brown, History and Architectural Heritage of Stone County, (Little Rock, Arkansas: Arkansas Historic Preservation Program, unknown publication date), p. 5; digital image, Department of Arkansas Heritage, (http://www.arkansaspreservation.com/pdf/publications/stone_county.pdf  :accessed 12 Oct 2013.)

[15] Brown, History and Architectural Heritage of Stone County, p 5.

[16] Brown, History and Architectural Heritage of Stone County, p 9.

[17] Ibid.

[18] Ibid.

[19] http://local.arkansas.gov/ : accessed 12 Oct 2013.

[20] 1900 U.S. census, Stone Co., Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 142A, dwell. 126, fam. 126, Mary J. McIntire.

[21] Ibid.

[22] Ibid.

[23] Ibid.

[24] Ibid.

[25] Ibid.

[26] Ibid.

[27] Ibid, plus a review of p. 138-147.

[28] 1900 U.S. census, Stone Co., Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 142A, dwell. 126, fam. 126, Mary J. McIntire.

[29] Ibid.

[30] Ibid.

[31] Ibid.

[32] Ibid.

[33] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 68.

[34] 1900 U.S. census, Stone Co., Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 140A, dwell. 96, fam. 96 [dwelling and family originally written as 95, then overwritten as 96], Joseph Simpson.

[35] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 250. [Pierce Via’s citation notes marriage records are from Stone County, Arkansas marriage records, Book B, p 373.]

[36] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 250.

[37] Ibid.

[38] Ibid.

[39] Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 20 Jan 2014), memorial page for Nellie Vickers Albright  (1895-1973), Find A Grave Memorial # 8,807,695, citing Prince Cemetery, Bald Knob, White County, Arkansas.

[40] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 29, 85, 143 and 346.

[41] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 250.

[42] 1910 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, population schedule, Cove Township, enumeration district (ED) 145, p. 206 (stamped), sheet 1A (handwritten), dwelling 9, family 9, W. A. Vickers; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T624,  roll 64.

[43] Ibid.

[44] Ibid.

[45] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014), “Carrigan, Vickers, Densford and Wade Family, Vickers Family, Bridges Family and My Gatewood Family ” entries for Mary Jane Berryhill (1854-abt 1910); submitted by [private user names], citing 1870 and 1900 U. S. Censuses.

[46] Ibid.

[47] 1920 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, population schedule, Cove, enumeration district (ED) 147, p. 2951 (handwritten), sheet 1A (handwritten), dwelling 6, family 6, W. A. Vickers; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T625,  roll 82.

[48] 1920 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 2951, dwell. 9, fam. 9, Cleveland McIntire.

[49] 1920 U.S. census, Cleveland County, Oklahoma, pop., sch., Norman City, enumeration district (ED) 17, p. 9663 (handwritten), sheet 3B (handwritten), dwelling 126, family 58, Jasper A. McIntyre; citing NARA microfilm publication T625,  roll 1456.

[50] “Arkansas County Marriages, 1838–1957,” database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 20 Nov 2014), entry for Nettie Vickers-Silas Albright, 4 July 1914; citing  digital images of originals housed at courthouse, Stone County, Arkansas.

[51] Find A Grave, memorial page for Nellie Vickers Albright(1895-1973), Find A Grave Memorial # 8,807,695, the accompanying photograph by Annette Pillow clearly indicates the birth and death dates.

[52] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014),  “Vickers Family, Evelyn Durlene Humphrey Deichman Family, Vicker Family, Thompson Family, McAndrew, Glaze, Lamb, McIntyre Family and My Gatewood Family ” entries for Otis McIntire (1913-1914); submitted by [private user names].

[53] Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 20 Jan 2014), memorial page for Odis Vickers (1913-1914), Find A Grave Memorial # 14,181,749, citing Cove Cemetery, Mountain View, Stone County, Arkansas; the accompanying photograph by OkieBran indicates parents, the birth date of 01 Mar 1913 and death dates of Nov 1914 [no date of death.]

[54] 1930 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, population schedule, Wallace Township, enumeration district (ED) 69-27, p. 270 (stamped on opposite page), sheet 3B (handwritten), dwelling 60, family 60, W. A. Vickers; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014); citing NARA microfilm publication T626, roll 95.

[55] 1930 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 270, dwell. 61, fam. 61, Elihue Vickers.

[56] Ibid.

[57] 1930 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 270, dwell. 60, fam. 60, William A. Vickers.

[58] 1930 U.S. census, Stone County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 270, dwell. 61, fam. 61, Elihue Vickers.

[59] “Public Member Trees,” database, Ancestry.com  (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 20 January 2014),  “Vickers Family, Evelyn Durlene Humphrey Deichman Family, Thompson Family, Hardin Family and Scott Family ” entries for William Alfonzo McIntire (1874-1938); submitted by [private user names].

[60] Find A Grave, database and images (http://findagrave.com : accessed 20 Jan 2014), memorial page for William A. Vickers (1874-1938) and Daisy Vickers (1887-1965), Find A Grave Memorial #6,859,773, citing York Cemetery, Marcella, Stone County, Arkansas, accompanying photograph by Virgil and Deanna C. Cooley.

[61] 1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, population schedule, Dyees township, enumeration district 47-22, p. 430 (stamped), sheet 31A (handwritten), order of visit 559, no family # written, no dwelling # written, Daisy Vickers; digital image,  Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com: accessed 11 Oct 2013); citing NARA microfilm publication T627, roll 155.

[63] Ibid.

[64] Ibid.

[65] Ibid.

[66] Ibid.

[67] Ibid.

[69] Ibid.

[70] Ibid.

[71] http://www.mcagov.com/ : accessed 12 Oct 2013.

[72] 1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 430, order of visit 559, Daisy Vickers.

[73] 1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 430, order of visit 557, Wymon Vickers.

[74]1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 430, order of visit 559, Daisy Vickers.

[75] 1940 U.S. census, Mississippi County, Arkansas, pop. sch., p. 430, order of visit 557, Wymon Vickers.

[76] Pierce [Via], McIntires and Elliotts, p 250.

 

Written for 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks challenge at No Story Too Small.

 

Copyright © 2014 Andrea Musgrove Perisho

 

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